November 1998 Weekly Firesides

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group 
Distribution Coast to Coast 
Week ending 01 November 1998 

Hi from your substitute Editor, filling in once again for my "wandering" partner. While not as "eloquent" as he is, nor is my music collection as vast or varied, I'll try to keep you up to date. <G> As it turns out, however, we are both big fans of the Gaither Vocal Band. I'd like to thank Textroops, Jim's "old" partner, for coming and giving me a "hand". It was good seeing the "new faces" and also some of you we hadn't seen in a while. We're glad you came!!!!!!! All Y'all come back pretty quick, ya hear.

Heh, heh, heh.. Jim is NEVER going to let me do the Weekly Fireside again!!!!!! 

I just couldn't fit everything in the space AOL allows and there was just too much good stuff to cut anything out!!!!!! Sooooooo, in unprecedented fashion, I divided the Fireside into 2 parts. 

Jim... see what happens when you go away!!!!!!!!!

Again please take notice in the Upcoming Events Schedule that the "Border Wars" Fireside that was scheduled for 11/5/98 will be shifted to 11/19/98. Jim's been reading voraciously here lately and he's run across some great material he can’t wait to share at the Fireside Tales.... We’ll have a great run up through Christmas. :-)

This Thursday is OPEN CHAT........

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU :-)..... 
COME AGAIN, WE "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY.... 

The continuing series Jim's been putting in the newsletter under the HELP DESK, is on the Civil War Military Records which can be found at, or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers (FHCs)........ So many of you have been astonished that those records are available through the FHCs, that we thought this would be of worth in your research.... 

***********ANNOUNCEMENT**********


Beginning THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5TH, 9 PM ET IN ROOT CELLAR
I, GFS Jayne, will be hosting the DE/MD genealogy chatroom. 
If you are researching ancestry in either of these two states, 
please come and join me, 
maybe you'll find a cousin or two.
Also, please bring with you suggestions for topics
that interest or even stump you.
*******************************************
THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". 
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters".
*******************************************
U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers....

THIS SERIES WILL CONTINUE UPON JIM'S RETURN.. DON'T MISS IT!!!
*******************************************

DID YOU KNOW??.........
*The first C.S.A. military prison, a converted three-story tobacco barn was located in Richmond, VA
*The first Jewish chaplain was appointed by Abraham Lincoln in September 1862, after months of congressional debate.
*Congress first authorized a Medal of Honor for enlisted men of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps on December 21, 1861.
* The highest ranking civilian to volunteer for military service during the Civil War was Hannibal Hamlin, vice president of the United States.
* The first post of the Grand Army of the Republic was organized in Springfield, Illinois on April 1, 1866.
*******************************************
A BIT OF COMMUNITY......

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of 
Interest and Pleas for HELP...

*******************************************
Subj: Civil war in Semo
From: Cato3240

http://rosecity.net/civilwar/home.html
Click on Bollinger Co page and the last paragraph
tells of the mass grave.

{{{{{Cato}}}}} Thanks for sharing, this is quite an interesting site. 

*******************************************

Subj: Fwd: [BRAZIL-L] civil war
From: JJVascon

Ran across this reference to a web page on Confederates in Brazil which may be of interest to some of your SIG participants. 
----------------
Forwarded Message: 
Subj: Re: [BRAZIL-L] civil war
From: marshall@rockisland.com (Marshall)

Have you checked out this website of the Sons of Confederate
Veterans/Confederado descendants in Brazil?

http://www.scv.org/Camp1653/

{{{{{John}}}}} Thanks so much... I'm sure there's someone in our distribution of about 800 who will be tickled to death to have this information.

********************************************
Subj: Fwd: GRS Volume 1 Issue 12
From: KINFOLK919

Forwarded Message: 
Subj: GRS Volume 1 Issue 12
From: info@genrecords.com (Tracey Converse)

Genealogy Records Service
Volume 1, Issue 12
25 September 1998

1. MILITARY RECORDS-Part 2
(c) Linda Haas Davenport 
http://www.avana.net/~lhaasdav/Haas.html

Pensions for the War of 1812 were not authorized until 1871 and were
granted to all of those still living in 1871. However, disabled soldiers
from the War of 1812 received pensions under the Old Wars Act prior to 1871.
The Indian War Pensions are microfilmed and most are indexed. They are
found under; Indian Survivor's Originals; Indian survivor's certificates;
Indian widow's originals and Indian widow's certificates.
The Mexican War Pension files are much the same as other files, except they
required the maiden name of the wife, the names of any former wives, death
or divorce information about previous wives and the names and dates of
birth of all living children.
There cannot possibly be a war that has produced as many books as the Civil
War, especially in the Southern States. Walk into any library in the south
(regular or genealogical) and you will find shelf after shelf of books
about the Civil War. This War touched so many families and wrought such
devastation in so much of the young USA that it has produced an
unbelievable amount of information. This War produced a multitude of
records that contain valuable genealogical information. The majority of
these records have been indexed and many of the actual compiled service
records have been filmed. When a record for an ancestor is found in one of
the indexes the actual service record abstract card(s) may be ordered from
the National Archives. Some of the Compiled Service Records have been
microfilmed and are available to you to search, but some states records
have not been filmed. Most of the confederate, all Union in Confederate
States and all border states are on film. Smaller states are still in the
process of being filmed. Check to see what states and areas are available.
Union Army Records: By act of Congress, March 1863, the federal draft
system was created. Men between the ages of 25 and 40, both white male
citizens and aliens who had declared their intent to naturalize, were
eligible for the draft. Males 20-35 and unmarried males 35-45 had to serve
unless physically disabled. Males 17-20 could serve with the permission of
a parent or guardian. The draft applied only to men residing in the US
under Union control.
The draft created 3 kinds of records: (1) Consolidated Lists: These are the
most important individual records. An entry gives his name, place of
residence, age as of 1 Jul 1863, occupation, marital status, state,
territory, or country of birth, and the military organization (if already a
volunteer) of which he was a member. The records are arranged by state and
thereunder by congressional or enrollment district. (2) Descriptive Rolls:
These rolls give additional information of men eligible for service.
Although many of the entries are not completely filled out, they may give a
personal description, exact place of birth, and whether accepted or
rejected for service. These records are also filed by state and thereunder
by congressional district. To the best of my knowledge Neither of these
Lists has been microfilmed yet. They are a part of Record Group 110 and are
available only at the National Archives in Washington, DC. To use these
records you must know the number of the congressional district for the
county in which a man lived. This can be determined by using Congressional
Directory for the Second Session of the 38th Congress of the United States
(Washington DC: For the Joint Houses of Congress, 1865) available in many
large genealogical libraries, in many local libraries and most college
libraries and from the Government Printing Office. Once the Congressional
district has been determined a request for a search can be sent to the
National Archives. (3) Case Files on Drafted Aliens. These files concern
only aliens who were drafted and released between 1861-64. These files may
include name, district from which drafted, country of citizenship, age,
length of time in the US and a physical description. The records are in
alphabetical order by surname in record group 59 available only at the
National Archives. (5)
Union Army (for non regular army men) records contain enlistment papers,
muster rolls, prisoner-of-war papers, death reports and others. The records
are indexed by state and by military units for those units organized within
a specific state. You must know the state in which a solider served or the
unit with which he served to obtain his service record. Enlistment papers
often contained a description of the soldier and the place where he
enlisted. Typically, a soldier enlisted near his home.
If you cannot find your ancestor's military information and you know he was
eligible (or the right age) for military duty in the Civil War remember,
many men were rejected from Civil War service because of illness or injury.
Medical records of drafted and rejected men are at the National Archives,
Record Group #110. They are arranged by Congressional District as of 1863.
Data may include residence, occupation, age, place of birth, physical
characteristics or reasons for rejection.
Confederate Service Records: When Richmond was evacuated by the 
Confederate
Government in April 1865 the centralized military personnel records of the
Confederate Army were taken to Charlotte, NC. These records were later
taken to Washington DC along with other Confederate records captured by the
Union Army. Between 1878-1901 The War Department tried to locate as many
Confederate Records as possible. In 1903 The Secretary of War asked all
governors of the Southern States to lend all of their Confederate Records
to the War Department for copying. (6)
The Union Army kept fairly accurate records of units mustered and furnished
the states with this information. The Confederate States didn't. The muster
rolls and other military paperwork stayed with the commander of the unit
and thus were scattered everywhere. Some were turned in to the Confederate
Military Personnel Office or Southern State government, some were kept for
years by the commander or his family. With the decision of the Southern
Sates to issue pensions to Confederate Servicemen the need for these
records became acute. The War Department with the help of the Southern
States began to actively seek out these records. The War Department began
to compile service records for those soldiers who were applying for a
pension. The Service Record was compiled from what original records were
available; Confederate muster rolls, returns, descriptive rolls and Union
prison and parole records. Later the War Department began to compiled
service records for all Confederate Soldiers. This project went on until
1927 when it was finally completed. All of the War Departments records
(both Union and Confederate) were moved to the National Archives where they
are today
This huge project is referred to as the "Compiled Military Service
Records". The compiled military service record of a Confederate soldier is
kept in a jacket envelope filed with envelopes for other soldiers in the
same regiment or similar unit. The compiled service records usually provide
the following; age, place of enlistment, places served, place of discharge
or death and often a physical description. The National Archives has
microfilmed indexes to the service records and most of the compiled service
records themselves. Indexes will provide the rank, unit and name of the
soldier and the pertinent file can then be ordered from the NARS.
The War Department's Compiled Confederate Records are not complete, even
though great efforts were made to assemble all official information. A
soldier may have served in a state militia and never mustered into the
Confederate Army. It is wise to check the State Archive, in the state you
believe your ancestor lived in for all of their Confederate Records. Many
of the southern state archives have copies of their state's NARS microfilm
and, many times, records that were never sent to the War Department to be
copied.
The LDS is continually releasing new microfilm records. Check the Military
Records Register at your local FHC. 
Two other sources should be checked for Confederate ancestors: (1) Military
Academy Records. Try Biographical Resister, Officers and Graduates of the
US Military Academy, West Point, New York 3rd ed., 9 vols. (Boston:
Houghton-Miffli, 1891) Many of the officers of the Confederate Army were
graduates of West Point and had to choose sides when the war began.
And (2) probably the most overlooked of all sources, local court records.
Reconstruction brought about many bitter and lengthy court battles. 
Pension files for the Civil War are found in 9 categories: Navy survivors'
originals, navy survivor's certificates, navy widows' originals, navy
widows' certificates, survivor's originals, survivors' certificates,
widows' originals, widow's certificates, "C" and "XC" files.
These pension files contain such items as; Name of the veteran, the
military or navel unit in which he served, the date and place of his
enlistment, his birth date and place, the date and place of his marriage,
the names and birth dates of his children, the maiden name of his wife,
information about subsequent marriages, the date and place of his
discharge, the physical disabilities connected with his service-related
injuries, and his residences since his discharge. They will usually contain
affidavits of individuals who could attest to his disabilities, character,
etc. Once again, these pension files have been indexed and the indexes are
found at the NARS, the LDS FHCs and many libraries. 
One of the most valuable things found in the pension files is the list of
places the veteran lived. With the westward expansion people moved many
times between census years and this record can be the key to finding them
between the census.
Post Civil War Service Records for soldiers serving in the armed forces
after the Civil War are not as readily available, even though the records
of these later Wars are more detailed. Using records for soldiers who
served within the last 75 years is restricted to immediate family members
under the provisions of the Right-to-Privacy Acts. Most of the federal
records are housed at the National Personnel Records Center, 9700 Page
Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63132. A fire in 12 July 1973 destroyed millions
of records and damaged millions more. According to the Record Center - 80%
of the army records for 1912-50; 60% of the air force records for 1947-63
and 1 % or less of Army records for people discharged after 1973 were
destroyed. Records for active veterans have been reconstructed, there are
no plans to reconstruct the other records.
Documents issued to the veteran at the time of discharge (or to his/her
next of kin in the case of death) usually contain important genealogical
information. The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA as amended in 1974) does.
require the release of some information from the National Personnel Records
Center. If the serviceman/woman is deceased be sure to send a copy of the
death certificate with your request for information. The center charges for
searches, copying, etc. contact them for current rates.(7)
Original draft card records for WWI were transferred to the National
Archives Regional Branch in East Point, GA in 1990. The LDS filmed all
cards and the microfilm is now available at the FHCs. Ancestry has WWI
draft cards on-line at their site, but be forewarned that they are not
complete! In searching for 6 of my male ancestors in their records I did
not find a one, even though I made copies of the original draft cards at
the East Point Archives. Stick with the LDS film. I was at the Archives
several times while the filming was going on and the volunteers did an
outstanding job of making sure the microfilm was accurate. The cards are
arranged by state and then draft district. Within the district the cards
are filed alphabetically by last name. 
As people were discharged from the Service they were requested to file
their discharge papers at their local courthouse. Most of these records
have not been microfilmed and must still be researched at the local level. 

Now I Know About Military Records What Do I Do?
If you have managed to read this far you should have an excellent idea of
what to do to find your ancestor in the existing Military Records. But a
few tips may help.
1. Never assume an ancestor DIDN'T serve in a war. Many young men lied
about their age to get into the service. 
2. Never overlook a non-direct ancestor if your direct ancestor's age or
health shows he couldn't have served. 
3. Keep on the look-out for mention of military service in local court
records, land records, tax lists, etc. Check all State Militia lists. 
4. Always check unit rosters even if you believe you ancestor never served
in the military, watch for names of neighbors and misspellings of family
names. 
5. Once an ancestor is found in a military unit, find all information
available about the unit. Use this information to "flesh out" your family
history. Check printed sources for information about your ancestor.
Remember that if you ancestor disappeared right after a war he may well
have moved to a location where he was stationed during the war which
appealed to him. He might have taken his Military Bounty Land Warrant and
moved. He may have married while in the war and moved to the area where his
wife had family. 
6. Check for Pension or Military Bounty Land files. Check NARA indexes for
both. 
7. If an entry is found in the Index - order the pension file (remember the
10 page rule) 
8. If your ancestor lived in the South, check local court records for
confiscated land and slaves. Don't overlook the records for the "Freedman
Bureau".
There are many War Sites on the Internet, especially for the Civil War.
Many have searchable records on-line, information submitted by people who
have already found their serviceman and these sites continue to add
information daily. Be sure to visit all of the sites you can find for the
War you are interested in.
The Source ed. Arlene Eakle and Johni Cerny has a wonderful chapter on
Military Records with examples of Compiled Service Records, Pension Files
and Bounty Land files. This book is available at most Genealogical
Libraries or can be ordered from Ancestry

Footnotes: 
The Source ed. Arlene Eakle and Johni Cerny; (Ancestry Publishing Company,
Salt Lake City, UT 1984) pgs 255-298
(1) ____ pg 255
(2) ____ pg 272
(4) ____pg 257
(5) ____ pg 261
(7) ____ pg 265
(3) "Mothers of Invention; Women of the Slaveholding South in the American
Civil War" by Drew Gilpin Faust; published by The University of North
Carolina Press, Chapel Hill & London; 1996
(4) Wallace Brown, The Good Americans: The Loyalists in the American
Revolution. New York: William Morrow & Co., 1969
(6) National Archives web site (http://www.nara.gov) May 1998

************************************************
Subj: Civil War Medals
From: GHowe8749

A list of unclaimed Civil War Medals
http://www.wvlc.wvnet.edu/history/medalm-z.html 

{{{{{George}}}}} Thanks... I haven't had a chance to check it out yet... but I will :-) 

*************************************************
Substitue Editors NOTE: Some of the following URLs don't apply to the Civil War but there are some here that different folk have asked for at one time or another..

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

From: GHowe8749

Daughters of the American Revolution 
http://www.chesapeake.net/DAR

Daughters of the Republic of Texas
http://www.drtl.org/~drtl/index.html

Descendents of Mexican War Veterans
http://member.aol.com/dmwv/home.htm

Descendents of Washington's Army at Valley Forge
http://www.execpc.com/~drg/widwavf.html

General Society of the War of 1812
http://LanClio.org/1812.htm

General Society Sons of the Revolution
http://www.execpc.com/~drg/gssro.html

Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.)
http://pages.prodigy.com/CGBD86A/garhp.htm
for male descendents 

Ladies of the Grand Army of the Republic
http://suvcw.org/lgar.htm

Women's Relief Corps
http://suvcw.org/wrc.htm
for female descendents of Union soldiers of the Civil War.

Point Lookout Prisoner of War Organization
http://barbados.cc.odu.edu/~bkb300z/plpow/plpow.html
for descendents of POWs at the Point Lookout, Maryland prison during
the American Civil War.

Sons of the American Revolution
http://www.sar.org/

Sons of Confederate Veterans
http://scv.org/

Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War.
http://SUVCW.org/

Link to the Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War.
http://suvcw.org/duv.htm

United Daughters of the Confederacy
http://www.hsv.tis.net/~maxs/UDC/

{{{{{George}}}}} Again.... Thanks... one of these days I'll have time to look at all of these...

*********************************************

Subj: Trans-Mississippi Bibliography
From: jamesrey@swbell.net (James R. Reynolds) aka TexTroops

Following is my bibiliography for the Trans-Mississippi department. It is not complete but it is what I have presently. If you do not want to include all this info in the "Fireside" you may direct the readers to the bibliography page of my web site at http://home.swbell.net/jamesrey/8mobib.htm.
See ya Thursday.
James R. (Jim, TexTroops) Reynolds

Alberts, Don E., "The Battle of Glorieta, Union Victoy in the West", Texas A&M University Press, College Station, Texas,
1998. 

Anonymous, Untitled Article, Confederate Veteran, vol. X, 1902, p. 266. 

Banasik, Michael E., "Embattled Arkansas, The Prairie Grove Campaign of 1862", Broadfoot Publishing Company,
Wilmington, Delaware, 1996. 

Banasik, Michael E., Unpublished Research Articles. 

"Battles and Leaders of the Civil War", Johnson, Robert Underwood and Buel, Clarence Clough editors, Castle, Secaucus,
New Jersey. 

Brown, Norman D., "JOURNEY TO PLEASANT HILL, The Civil War Letters of Captain Elijah P. Petty, Walker's Texas
Division, CSA", The University of Texas Institute of Texan Cultures, San Antonio, Texas, 1982. 

Castel, Albert, "General Sterling Price and the Civil War in the West", Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge,
Louisiana, 1968. 

Coleman, R. B., Where the Eighth Missouri Surrendered, Confederate Veteran, vol. XXXIII, 1925, pp. 155, 158. 

Cottrell, Steve, "Civil War in Texas and New Mexico Territory", Pelican Publishing Company, Gretna, Louisiana, 1998. 

Hale, Douglas, "The Third Texas Cavalry in the Civil War", University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma, 1993. 

Johannson, M. Jane, "PECULAR HONOR, A History of the 28th Texas Cavalry 1862-1865", The University of Arkansas
Press, Fayetteville, Arkansas, 1998. 

Johnson, Ludwell H., "Red River Campaign, Politics & Cotton in the Civil War", Kent State University Press, Kent, Ohio,
1993. 

Josephy, Alvin M., Jr., "The Civil War in the American West", Vintage Books, New York, New York, 1991. 

Joslyn, Mauriel Phillips, IMMORTAL CAPTIVES, The Story of Six Hundred Confederate Officers and the U. S. Prisoner of
War Policy, White Mane Publishing Company, Ind., Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, 1996. 

Kennedy, James Ronald and Walter Donald, "The South Was Right", Pelican Publishing Company, Gretna, Louisiana, 1994. 

Letters and Correspondence as pertains to Colonel Charles Mitchell or the 8th Missouri Infantry for the1862 and the Prairie
Grove Campaign, Copy Letter Book, Peter W. Alexander Collection, Columbia University, New York, New York. Copies
supplied by Michael E. Banasik. 

Letters and Correspondence as pertains to Colonel Charles Mitchell or the 8th Missouri Infantry for the1862 and the Prairie
Grove Campaign, Letters and Correspondence, M. M. Parsons, Peter W. Alexander Collection, Columbia University, New
York, New York. Copies supplied by Michael E. Banasik. 

"Lone Star Blue and Gray, Essays on Texas in the Civil War", Wooster, Ralph A., editor, Texas State Historical Association,
Austin, Texas, 1995. 

Long, E. B., and Barbara Long, "The Civil War Day by Day An Almanac 1861-1865", A Da Capo Press, 1971. 

McCaffrey, James M., "This Band of Heroes, Granbury's Texas Brigade, C.S.A.", Texas A&M University Press, College
Station, Texas, 1996. 

Mitchell, C. S., Letter in the Little Rock True Democrat, January 21, 1863. 

Monaghan, Jay, "Civil War on the Western Border, 1854-1865", University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln, Nebraska, 1955. 

Muster Roll of Company D, 1st Pricinct, Parker Country, 1st Frontier District, Texas States Troops, February 1, 1864 and
July 1, 1864, Adjutant General's Record Group (RG 401), Archives Division - Texas State Library. 

Muster Roll of Regimental Staff, 2nd Texas Mounted Rifles, Texas States Troops, Adjutant General's Record Group (RG
401), Archives Division - Texas State Library. 

Muster Roll of Company H, 2nd Texas Mounted Rifles, Texas State Troops, April 17, 1861, May 23, 1861 and March 15,
1862, Adjutant General's Record Group (RG 401), Archives Division - Texas State Library. 

National Archives, Microfilm, M861, roll #35. 

National Archives, Record Group #109, Confederate Muster Rolls. 

Oates, Stephen B., "Confederate Cavalry West of the River", University of Texas Press, Austin, Texas, 1961. 

Pinnell, Ethan A., Capt., Unpublished Diary, transcription supplied by Michael E. Banasik. Original in the possession of the
Missouri Historical Society, Jefferson Memorial Library, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Shea, William L., "Civil War Campaigns and Commanders, War in the West Pea Ridge and Prairie Grove", Ryan Place
Publishers, Forth Worth, Texas, 1996 

Sifakis, Stewart, "Compendium of the Confederate Armies, Kentucky, Maryland, Missouri, The Confederate Units and the
Indian Units", Facts on File, Inc., New York, New York, 1995. 

Smith, David Paul, "Frontier Defense in the Civil War; Texas' Rangers Rebels", Texas A&M University Press, College Station,
Texas, 1992. 

Supplement to the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Broadfoot Publishing Co., Wilmington, Delaware,
1996. 

Taylor, Richard, "Distruction and Reconstruction: Personal Experiences of the Civil War", Da Capo Press, New York, New
York, 1995. 

The War of the Rebellion, "Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies", Government Printing Office, Washington,
D.C., 1888. The National Historical Society, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, 1971. 

Warner, Ezra J., "Genrals in Gray, Lives of the Confederate Commanders", Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge,
Louisiana, 1959.

Western Historical Manuscripts Collection, University of Missouri, Colombia, Missouri.

Bull, William, Unpublished Memoirs, original in the possession of the Western Historical Manuscripts Collection, University of
Missouri Colombia. 

Hoskin, William, Unpublished Dairy, original in the possession of the Western Historical Manuscripts Collection, University of
Missouri Colombia. 

Loomis, Daniel, Unpublished letters, original in the possession of the Western Historical Manuscripts Collection, University of
Missouri Colombia. 

McMahon, Robert T., unpublished diary, original in the possession of the Western Historical Manuscripts Collection, University
of Missouri Colombia. 

Mitchell, Spencer H., Unpublished letter to parents written January, 1863 from Little Rock, Arkansas, original in the possession
of the Western Historical Manuscripts Collection, University of Missouri Colombia. 

Rockwell, Jacob H., unpublished memoir, original in the possession of the Western Historical Manuscripts Collection,
University of Missouri Colombia.

{{{{{TEX}}}}} Thanks for sending this and sharing it with the "faithful"..
**************************************************

Subj: addresses
From: NEVassau

Here are some addresses that may be of interest 

~~~~~~~~~~

* The Nation's cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. Visit it on the
Internet at: 

http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/michael_patterson_4/michaelq.htm

This site is a complete treatise on Arlington National Cemetery.
It is not simply a history. It lists everyone who has been
interred there and provides a biographical sketch of each person.
It is obvious that a lot of work was put into this project.

One invaluable print reference on contemporary cemeteries is:
United States Cemetery Address Book. It is published annually by
Indices Publishing Company. It lists over 25,000 cemeteries in
the United States.

Also, a new (free) on-line service is being developed called the
Cemetery Listing Association. You simply type in the deceased
person's name, State, and year of death. You'll find this service
at:

http://mininet.smu.edu/cla/

* A cautious dare to visit "City of the Silent" webpage may be
rewarding. Along with the cemetery clip art area and the post-
mortem booklist, the "caretaker" of the site also includes an on-
line encyclopedia of grave terminology and a brief history of
cemeteries. Please tap in: 

http://www.best.com/"gazissax/city.html


-Print a copy of this helpful list of oral history questions that will give you
ideas to customize your personal list that you will use in YOUR situation.
Go to-- http://www.rootsweb.com/~genepool/oralhist.htm

Since so many of the Acadians are associated with Nova Scotia, here is the website address for the Nova Scotia Genealogy Society:

http://www.ccn.cs.dal.ca/Recreation/GANS/gans_homepage.html

and the Nova Scotia Planter Database

http://aerodyn.utias.utoronto.ca/html/lo2.htm


-- Tips on using the "Alta Vista" Search Engine -

The Alta Vista search engine is wonderful. It is my favorite because I have
had such good luck using it.

Step 1: Go and bookmark Alta Vista from this address--
http://altavista.digital.com/

Step 2: Put the word 'family' in front of the surname that you want to
look up. Make sure that the SURNAME is in quotations. Here is my
surname "Ragan" as an example:

family "ragan"

Step 3: Click on the SUBMIT button. This will help Alta Vista bring the
genealogy type pages towards the front. They will look much like this:

Re: Ragan Family of Yellow Creek 1806 -1840's
Re: Ragan Family of Yellow Creek 1806 -1840's. [ Follow Ups ]
[Post Followup ] [XXI's Genealogy Message Board ] [ FAQ ] 

(Lafayette W. RAGAN - Laura Chambliss RAND )
Index of Persons. Lafayette W. RAGAN (ABT 1849/1850 - )
Monroe RAGAN (ABT 1857/1858 - ) Robert O. RAGAN
(ABT 1819/1820 - ) Sylvester RAGAN (ABT 1856/1857..

Step 4: Then you can go right to any of these Web pages with a click of your
mouse. I also recommend trying your search like this:

genealogy "ragan" OR history "ragan" 

If you have a very common surname (like Smith or Jones) try the same
approach using FULL names. For example:

family "George Jones" (then hit the SUBMIT button)
--------------------------

Here are a few of the things you will see on the Treasure Map's Web site at--
http://www.firstct.com/fv/tmapmenu.html

*********************
*Learn "how-to" in the Research Room*

-Five steps to Getting Started on your Family History
 http://www.firstct.com/fv/pedigree.html

-How-to get past the "Stone Wall Syndrome." Every researcher runs into the
stone wall. This can help you climb over it. 
 http://www.firstct.com/fv/stone.html

A fascinating tutorial on Deciphering Old Handwriting.
http://www.firstct.com/fv/oldhand.html

**********************
*Finding U.S. Treasures*

-An outstanding tutorial on the U.S. Federal Census.
http://www.firstct.com/fv/uscensus.html

-Exclusive guide showing how-to use the many Research
Outlines (from LDS Church) that are already on-line. 
http://www.firstct.com/fv/usout.html

*********************
*World's Largest Collection of Genealogical Records*
 
-Starting point of unique tutorial of the Family History Library (FHL) in
Salt Lake City, Utah. Learn why a Family History Center (FHC) near you, can
be your valuable link to the FHL. This is very important because the FHL is
NOT on-line. 
http://www.firstct.com/fv/lds1.html

-The "FamilySearch" collection of both compiled and original records. One of
the most overlooked sources of "must have" genealogical information. 
http://www.firstct.com/fv/lds3.html

-Your Treasure Map to a genealogical "gold mine." The FHL Publications
List can be ordered for FREE.
 http://www.firstct.com/fv/lds4.html
----------------------------
THE PUBLICATIONS LIST
Call the Salt Lake Distribution Center:
1-800-537-5950 (U.S. or Canada) or
outside U.S. or Canada (801)240-1174 

Ask for copies of this FREE publication:
Item #34083 -Family History Publications List

There are too many great things to share in this e-mail. So be sure and
see the "World's Largest Collection" tutorial on Treasure Map's site at--
 http://www.firstct.com/fv/lds1.html

{{{{{Eileen}}}}} Thanks for sending this. Couldn't wait to share it with everyone else!

*******************************************
WHAT WE ARE ABOUT…………. 

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of. 

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate 
one Thursday a month to the sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; 
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, 
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on 
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly 
Fireside." 

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from 
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- 
haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events****** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFS Jayne and GFS Jim and our many fill-in friends :) 

11/5/98 - "OPEN CHAT"

11/12/98 - "Letters, Songs, and Poems" Night......

11/19/98 - "Border Wars" - GFS Jim "Many have asked for this again so here it is."

11/26/98 - Happy Thanksgiving to all. Your Hosts have the night off, but feel free to drop into the room if you'd like.

We'll See You Thursday Night……….! 
Your Hosts 
GFS Jayne and GFS Jim

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group 
Distribution Coast to Coast 
Week ending 8 November 1998

“I’m Home again” !!! All Joy!!! Heh Heh!!! I’ve missed ya, and I see where Jayne has kept up the newsletter in fine fashion... “Thanks Partner”.... I went by and had a nice visit with Dee over in Niceville, and man did she cook up a storm. I offered to take her out to eat, but nothing doing. She told me to get my self right over to her place so she could get some good old home cooking in me instead of that “store bought” stuff. LOL What a great evening we had.... And Jayne!!!! She gave me a big hug from ya. :-) Heh Heh....

This Thursday is Letters, Songs and Poems. Come enjoy!!!!!!!!!!!!

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU :-)..... 
COME AGAIN, WE "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY.... 

The continuing series I'm putting in the newsletter under the HELP DESK, is on the Civil War Military Records which can be found at, or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers (FHCs)........ So many of you have been astonished that those records are available through the FHCs, that we thought this would be of worth in your research.... 

************************************************************************************* 

THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". 
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters". 
************************************************************************************* 
U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers............................. 

The next stage of this series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records 
available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

Specific Union Sources........................... 

Union Army soldiers may have served in the U.S. Army, local militia units mustered into federal service, 
or volunteer regiments raised by the individual states. The length of service varied from 90 days to three 
years. Many soldiers also re-enlisted serving in more than one regiment. The Union Army and Navy 
enlisted over 2.3 million men, of which nearly 359,000 died in combat or from wounds and disease. 

Union Service Records 

Service Records of Soldiers. - There is currently no master index to the names of soldiers who served in 
Union volunteer regiments. (Note from the editor: A Union Soldiers Roster is in the making by Broadfoot 
Publishing. It's up to 13 volumes as this writing, but it's still incomplete.) Individual indexes to state volunteer regiments are available on microfilm for every Northern state and every Southern state except South Carolina. Most service records have not been microfilmed and are available only at the National Archives. The following service records and indexes are available on microfilm at the National Archives and the Family History Libraries........ 

........... continued. 

Census Records

The following is an 1890 census of Union Army and Navy veterans and widows:

“Schedules Enumerating Union Veterans and Widows of Union Veterans of the Civil War, 1890.”
National Archives Microfilm Publication M123. (FHL 118 films; FHLC computer number 59376.) The schedules fro the states alphabetically from Kentucky through Wyoming are available. They give name, rank, company, regiment or vessel, dates of enlistment and discharge, length of service, residence, disability, and remarks. To find specific microfilm numbers with the Family History Library Catalog on microfiche, search the Locality section under UNITED STATES - CENSUS - 1890.
State indexes to the 1890 Census are listed under [STATE] - CENSUS - 1890.

“The Thirteenth Plpulation Census of the United States, 1910.” National Archives Publication T624 (FHL 1,784 films; FHLC computer number 176588), asked whether an individual was a survivor of the Union Army (UA) or the Union Navy (UN). Some state censuses also had special schedules listing Union veterans. Examples on microfilm at the Family History Library include the New York census of 1865 and the Wisconsin census of 11885.

Cemetery Records

Nearly 359,000 soldiers in the Union forces lost their lives during the war. The following is the best source to begin searching for a Union soldier’s burial place:

Quartermaster General’s Office. “Roll of Honor: Names of Soldiers Who Died in Defense of the American Union”. 27 vols. Washington, D.C. U.S. Government Printing Office, 1865-71. (FHL films 1,311,589-91.) The records are arranged by the burial’s name, rank, regiment, company, and death date.

.......................to be continued
************************************************************************************ 
From: Cato3240

Jim
Have you looked at these Songs of the Civil War Sung by Members of the...
http://www.usmo.com/~momollus/CWMUSIC.HTM

{{Cato}} I just went out and looked. Good stuff, Thanks for the tip. By the Way thanks for the newletter.. Good reading on a calm night with my music. Heh Heh
***********************************************************************************
Subj: Civil War Widow Dies
From: GFS Jayne
Jimmy... 
The following was in the Eastman's newsletter I just received today.. didn't know whether you'd want to include it in the weekly fireside or not... 
Jayne
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

The following article is from Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter and is copyright 1998 by Richard W. Eastman and Ancestry, Inc. It is re-published here with the permission of the author.

Civil War Widow Dies
The Civil War may have ended 133 years ago, but widows of the soldiers are still living. Sadly, one Civil War widow has left us. The Associated Press reports that Daisy Anderson passed away September 19 at the age of 97. Her husband was a slave who ran away and joined the Union Army.
Mrs. Anderson was 21 years old in 1922 when she married a 79-year-old Civil War 
veteran, Robert Ball Anderson. Mr. Anderson died in a car accident in 1930.
Apparently the marriage was a matter of convenience for both parties. "I wanted a home. I didn't have anything. I didn't have but one dress. We had no chairs; we ate standing up at the table," she told the Denver Post last year. "We met 30 days before we got married, and I loved him until the day he died."
Robert Ball Anderson had been a slave in Kentucky. At age 22, he ran off to avoid 
whippings and joined the Union Army. It was late in the war, and he never saw action. After the Civil War he joined the Buffalo Soldiers on the Western frontier. While serving in New Mexico, he refused to carry out an order to kill an Indian woman and her baby, according to Mrs. Anderson.
Mrs. Anderson was born Daisy Graham in Tennessee's Hardin County on Dec. 14, 1900. Her father worked as a sharecropper, while she and her seven siblings hoed and picked cotton to help support the family.
The family left Tennessee in 1917 because of racial tension and moved to Forrest City, Arkansas, where she met Anderson after church one Sunday while he was in town visiting his brother. They were married after a brief courtship, both for the first time, and went to live on Anderson's 2,000-acre ranch near Hemingford, Nebraska.
After her husband's death, Mrs. Anderson moved to South Dakota and then to Steamboat Springs, Colo., to be near a sister. She became known as an author, poet and lecturer.
Mrs. Anderson's death leaves two known surviving Civil War widows: Alberta Martin, 91, of Elba, Alabama, who was married to a Confederate soldier, and Gertrude Grubb Janeway, 89, of Blaine, Tennessee, whose husband was a Union soldier.

{{{Jayne}}} Great news !! Thanks partner....
***********************************************************************************
DID YOU KNOW?? ................................... 
Excerpts from various areas of documented history or family journels........ 

During the Civil War there were many songs created, but one of the most memorable was the song “Battle Hymn of the Republic” written by Julia Ward Howe as a poem in early 1862 and sung by the soldiers to the tune of “John Brown’s Body”. The poem and was initially published as such in the Atlantic Monthly (Feb 1862 Issue). 
Among the singers of the “Battle Hymn” was Chaplain McCabe, the fighting chaplain of the 122nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He read the poem in the “Atlantic,” and was so struck with it that he committed it to memory before rising form his chair. He took it with him to the front, and in due time to Libby Prison, whither he was sent after being captured at Winchester. Here, in the great bare room where hundreds of Northern soldiers were herded together, came one night a rumor of disaster to the Union arms. A great battle, their jailers told them; a great Confederate victory. Sadly the Northern men gathered together in groups, sitting or lying on the floor, talking in low tones, wondering how, where, why. Suddenly, one of the Negroes who brought food for the prisoners stooped in passing and whispered to one of the sorrowful groups. The news was false: there had, indeed, been a great battle, but the Union army had won, the Confederates were defeated and scattered.
Like a flame the word flashed through the prison. Men leaped to their feet, shouted, embraced one another in a frenzy of joy and triumph; and Chaplain McCabe, standing in the middle of the room, lifted up his great voice and sang aloud,-----
“Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord!”
Every voice took up the chorus, and Libby Prison rang with the shout of “Glory, glory, hallelujah!”
The victory was that of Gettysburg. When, some time after, McCabe was released from prison, he told in Washington, before a great audience of loyal people, the story of his war-time experiences; and when he came to that night in Libby Prison, he snag the “Battle Hymn” once more. The effect was majical; people shouted, wept, and sang, all together; and when the song was ended, above the tumult of applause was heard the voice of Abraham Lincoln, exclaiming, while the tears rolled down his cheeks, ----

“Sing it again!” 
---Richards and Elliott, Julia Ward Howe

************************************************************************************
A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................ 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of 
Interest and Pleas for HELP................ 
************************************************************************************
From: Pacolady

I cannot say how much this means to me. I cant stay up that late every week, but I would like to . I don’t want to miss it but my health won’t let me do it often THANKYOU 
Sarah

{{{Sarah}}} You don’t know how much pleasure Jayne and I get from meeting needs like yours... :) Thanks for the note.
*************************************************************************************
From: AvalonPark
Jim:
Where would one go about looking for the book you mentioned in the Weekly Fireside 10/11/98? I live in California.

{{Avalon}} Any bookstore should carry the book “Cold Mountain”. It was on the bestseller list for quite some time. I happened to get mine at Barnes & Noble’s.... Happy reading...
*************************************************************************************
From: Hebfour

Has anyone read Frazier's book Cold Mountain ? If so, any opinions? I'd appreciate hearing from you.
Craig Heberton

“Craig” I’m reading it now, and I love it. Frazier has indeed done a job depicting the life “down home” away from the battles.... It is great reading.... If any of the rest of you reader’s have comments send them in and I’ll put them in the newsletter......
*************************************************************************************
From: TEvans8435

This is a Masonic tale re-told by Brother John Hohenstein for the
Brethren on the "Elektronik Research Lodge, #1", the Masonic Bulletin
Board on the Prodigy time-sharing service. It certainly bears
retelling. I have reposted it exactly as I originally found it.

My Brothers,
It occurs to me that, while we Freemasons have no shortage of
well known old tales of the Craft to discuss and cherish, there are
probably lots of good and true tales that we could share for
everyone's enlightenment and/or enjoyment. So, I have opened this
subject for such stories and, as a public service, I'll tell the
first tale. Now, there are those who would tell you that Old
Brother John never could keep a good story to himself and is simply
inventing another place to tell one. I myself, of course, disagree
with that belief completely. It is, however, a belief that I will
proudly tolerate.
My story begins in the Scottish Rite building in Savannah where
there stood for many, many years, in a small room adjacent to a
regular lodge, an antique safe which bore the name of my Lodge upon
its door. It was, perhaps, a topic of nervous conversation for many
candidates. If they inquired about the safe later, they were simply
told that the combination had joined "that which was lost" and no
Brother could remember a time when the safe had been used.
Then, a few years back, a locksmith petitioned our lodge. He
recognized the safe to be very old and asked about it. Upon hearing
the standard reply, he opened the safe.
Inside the safe were the minutes of the first 40 or so years of
my Lodge and, from those minutes, there emerged the real story within
my story. I do not have the minutes at hand now so I will tell the
rest of the story from memory and, of course, in my own words.
It was a time not long after Fort Sumter and The War of
Northern Aggression was well under way. The Yankees, as they are
still wont to do, had promptly flocked to Hilton Head and Tybee
Islands, the barrier islands on opposite sides of the mouth of the
Savannah River. The Savannah Folks didn't mind much that the Yankees
had stolen the good beaches, for the water was still a bit cool for
Southern preferences and, besides, they knew the gnats and mosquitos
would teach the Yankees a lesson they'd never forget. So, the
Southerners, as Southerners are wont to do sometimes, just waited.
They didn't have to wait very long before the Yankees on Hilton
Head sent out a messenger under a white flag.
No doubt the Southerners were amazed when, instead of a request
for Skin So Soft, it turned out to be something else that the Yankees
wanted. It seemed that the Yankees had among them a young fellow who
had passed through the Fellowcraft Degree before shipping out. The
Yanks were just sitting around slapping gnats when it occurred to one
of them that, just maybe, there was a nearby lodge that could test
him in the Fellowcraft Degree and raise him to that of a Master
Mason.
Bright fellows, those Yankees, but they forgot to ask about the
Skin So Soft.
As luck would have it, there was indeed a lodge in Savannah that
would soon be having a Masters Degree.
One morning, not too many days later, a detail of Confederate
Cavalry slipped across the Savannah River into South Carolina and
travelled through Bluffton to the shore opposite Hilton Head Island.
From there they escorted one Fellowcraft Mason and, I believe,
a number of Master Masons of the Northern Persuasion, safely through
the Confederate Lines and back through about 35 miles of Confederate
defenses to Savannah where the candidate and his witnesses were
delivered into the lodge.
The records note that this Brother was indeed proficient in the
Fellowcraft Degree and he was raised to the Degree of a Master Mason.
That night another detail of Confederate Cavalry, no doubt
Brothers to a man, slipped back across the Savannah River and safely
escorted their Brothers back to Hilton Head.
The minutes do not reflect whether the secret of Skin So Soft
was instilled in this new Brother.
Anyway, I have loved this story since the first time I heard it.
It clearly demonstrates that, at the darkest period in our Nation's
history, when brothers were killing brothers, Brothers could still be
Brothers.
If any of ya'll like my story, feel free to pass it around.
Print it out and read it at your lodge if you like for it is
Freemasonry's story not mine and it is true (except PERHAPS the part
about the Skin So Soft). :>
Sincerely and Fraternally,
John Hohenstein, Zerubbabel Lodge #15, Savannah, Georgia

{{TE}} Great story, thanks for sharing it. :)
*************************************************************************************
From: Jawote
I just got my reactment newspaper and this info was in it , Thought you would like it and can pass it on to others . Who may be interrested.

A musical CD by David Kincaid " The Irish Volunteer : Songs of the Irish Union Soldier 1861-1865 Released and distributed by Rykodisc USA . You may be able to order it from a music store . ( it may be on a CD or a tape )

{{Jawote}} Thanks for the information. I’m off looking for it. :-)
*************************************************************************************
From: FI WATROUS
Jim,
I forwarded the item regarding "Taps" to a few friends. I thought it was wonderful. -- Got this back today. Do you suppose the story was a bit of fiction?
Do we know what the origin of the story was?
Missed the Chat last week. Hope to be present this week. Missed seeing the "faithful".

Ike
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Subj: Re: The Beginning of A Military Tradition
From: DGross1226@aol.com

In a message dated 98-10-19 12:38:35 EDT, ____. writes:

<< The bugle melody was "Taps" first played at the funeral of it's creator.>>

My curiosity was piqued when earlier that day I read on page 79 in "America's
Musical Landscape" by Jean Farris (our 'Music of America' text at Glendale
College) that Taps "...was commissioned as an elegy for Civil War casualties."

Doing a brief Internet search, I found another yet rather interesting account:

TAPS - The Bugle Call

TAPS is the most beautiful bugle call. Played slowly and softly, it has a
smooth, tender, and touching character. It rolls down the curtains on the day
or upon life whenever it is played or sung.

The origin of the bugle call TAPS in its present form is generally attributed
to Major General Daniel Butterfield who commanded a brigade in the Army of the
Potomac during the Peninsular Campaign of 1862. After a particularly hard
fighting day as the weary troops settled down for the night along the James
River near Richmond Virginia, the bugler sounded "Extinguish Lights" or what
is more commonly called "Lights Out". On this night Butterfield felt that
this bugle call was not as smooth, melodious, and musical as it should be. He
felt that the day's final call should bring 
comfort and peace to tired troubled men. With the help of his bugler, Oliver
W. Norton, Butterfield composed the music to what we know today as TAPS.

Later in the Peninsular Campaign a funeral was being held during a lull in the
fighting. The bugler was ordered to play TAPS in place of the three volleys
usually used to render the final honors to a deceased comrade. This was done
because it was feared that rifle fire might cause the enemy to renew their
attack. The playing of TAPS was eventually written into Army regulations as a
part of the honors to be paid at a military funeral.

While there are no official words to the bugle call itself, the commonly used
lyrics are derived from the following verses:

Fading light dims the sight,
And a star gems the sky, gleaming bright.
From afar drawing nigh -- Falls the night.
Day is done, gone the sun,
From the lake, from the hills, from the sky;
All is well, safely rest, God is nigh.
Then good night, peaceful night,
Till the light of the dawn shineth bright;
God is near, do not fear -- Friend, good night.

Produced by Glen Carter, 2215 Lockhaven Dr. Colorado Springs, CO 80909. This
material was derived from the following sources: The Center of Military
History, Department of the U.S. Army, The American Legion Magazine, August
1974, and the National 4-H Club Song Book, National Committee on Boys and
Girls Club Work, 1938.>>

{{Ike}} These two versions of the origins of TAPS have been around for as long as I’ve been a Civil War Host. However I do believe the accepted creator of TAPS is considered to be Butterworth from his experiences as Gettysburg. I still continue to see the “Ellicott” version though pop up in magazines off and on. :-)
*************************************************************************************
From: Acadian99
An update for you, my friends:

A miracle entered my life in the form of Thomas Keaton, cousin of one of our Team Mates, GFSDonna. The roof is being fixed, he's giving me new doors and windows, the porch is now stablized and will be repaired, leaks and all. New steps on the back and shingles on the front portion of house and new tin in places that have been worn thin by over hanging branches. I'm even getting a small deck with benches on the front of the house to replace the small awning over the door. And the house will be bleached and painted! The broken trees in front are gone and it looks bare.....but with fall flowers it will be pretty. Oh, and I forgot he's going to fix the plumbing and redo the duct work and a/c drain pipe in the attic. Yes, and Angel has come into our life. Between what he is giving me free-he needs to clean out his garage for his Harley-and shopping for the best prices, the materials are costing me $600! He cut the trees for $100 and I paid the other tree cutter $300 to cut the tree off the roof. He didn't come back and clean up the debris, so Tom did that too.

Yes, brother Jim, I do BELIEVE in God and His love of even old Cajun sinners. Even if things go worse with my health, then I will be leaving a house that my daughter will be able to live in without worrying if her father can or can't fix things.
Life is good here in Ocean Springs. yessiree!
(((((((((99 Hugs))))))))
Sister Rosie

{{{{{{Sister Rosie}}}}}} That news is “Music” to my ears!! Thank God for caring people... I’m glad you’re being cared for in such a magnificent manner. Heh Heh ... Life is good ....
*************************************************************************************
From: jamesrey@swbell.net (James R. Reynolds)
Hey all,
Looks like some of out low life's have figured out a new way to introduce out children to drugs. I received this warning and thought I would pass it on.

WARNING TO PARENTS:
A form of tattoo called "Blue Star" is being sold to school children.
It is a small piece of paper containing a blue star.
They are the size of a pencil eraser and each star is soaked with LSD.
The drug is absorbed through the skin simply by handling the paper.
They are also brightly colored paper tattoos resembling postage stamps that have the pictures of the following on them:
Superman
Mickey Mouse
Clowns
Disney Characters
Bart Simpson
Butterflies

Each one is wrapped in foil. This s a new way of selling acid by appealing to young children. These are laced with drugs. If your child gets any of the above, do not handle them. These are known to react quickly and some are laced with strychnine.
Please feel free to reproduce this article and distribute it within your community and work place. Get the word out about the danger to our children.

FROM: J. O'Donnell, Danbury Hospital,
Outpatient Chemical Dependency
Treatment Service
Please copy and post! Give to friends.
Send copies to schools.
This is growing faster than we can train parents and professionals.

I do not personally know J. O'Donnell or Danbury Hospital, but thought you should be warned.
Take care.
Your Servant,
James R. (Jim) Reynolds

{{{Jim}}} thanks for the notice. This will certainly go in as a public service....
*************************************************************************************
From: Interclick
Thank you so much for the Weekly Fireside newsletter. I really enjoyed reading it and I have visited many of the suggested sites. Thank you very much.

Dawn

{{{Dawn}}} You very welcome :-)
*************************************************************************************
From: Joeycoch
Thank you so much for continuing to send me "The Weekly Fireside." I enjoy reading it to get my mind off the "trials and tribulations" going on about out family. My father-in-law is in the last stages of cancer and we are taking care of him at home. Each one does his or her share of just sitting with my mother-in-law so that she will not be alone.
I print up "The Firesides" and take my underlining pencil with me when I go. It seems to get her mind temporary off other things when we talk about something I have found of interest to read or just discuss. I feel that having something so very different to share with her makes it easier.
Please forgive me if a miss a few nights but I am thinking about the good friends I have made in the C W chat room, and will be back as soon as I can.

{{{Joey}}} LOL Don’t you DARE be asking forgiveness...... We’re honored the newsletter is being used so. Give your Father-in-law our best.


*************************************************************************************

From: EJMOULTON

Thank you for the newsletter. I enjoyed sitting in iast Thursday. I have a small book you might enjoy. It is "Cassie" The Girl with the Hero's Heart. It was written by Myrtle Long Haldeman who grew up on a farm in Hagerstown MD. Cassie's father was Ms. Haldeman's great-uncle. It is a charming story about a family living just minutes away from the site of the Battle of Antietam and her meeting with Clara Barton and President Lincoln. The book is published by Review and Herald Publishing Co., Hagerstown, MD.
See you Thursday. EJM

“EJM” Thanks for the tip... I’m off to find it. I’m including it in the newsletter because our membership is always looking for a new “Read”. LOL
*************************************************************************************

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT…………. 

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of. 

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate 
one Thursday a month to the sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; 
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, 
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on 
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly 
Fireside." 

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from 
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- 
haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events****** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFS Jayne and GFS Jim and our many fill-in friends :) 

11/12/98 - "Letters, Songs, and Poems" Night......

11/19/98 - "Border Wars" - GFS Jim "Many have asked for this again so here it is."

11/26/98 - OPEN CHAT” Happy Thanksgiving all.....

12/3/98 - “The Story of a Campaign by Mark Twain” - GFS Jim

12/10/98 - “Letters, Songs and Poems Night”

12/17/98 - “OPEN CHAT”

12/24/98 - “MERRY CHRISTMAS” To allow all of you to enjoy your Christmas time with Family, Your HOST’s are taking Christmas Eve OFF. And we’re gonna be funnin around with our Families as well. 

We'll See You Thursday Night……….! 
Your Hosts 
GFS Jayne and GFS Jim

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group 
Distribution Coast to Coast 
Week ending 15 November 1998

What a nice evening we had last Thursday sharing Letters, Songs and Poems. And Guess What??? We are Most Happy to Announce a new host who has come to join our Merry Band.... GFH TEG has put on his new Hat and joined our ranks. You know him as TUBES and the name his mother and father graced him with is Tom Gladwell. Jayne and I are just tickled to death to have him with us and the Civil War knowledge he brings with him. Join us in Welcoming Tom !!!!! .... Heh Heh!!!

I have been getting lots of email from you giving me different music artists and CDs to try, and I have gone out and tryed some of them and THEY ARE GREAT.... Thanks for the tips. Now to reciprocate, I'll tell you about a CD I'm listening to as I type and I'm sitting here grinning. Lord have mercy this girl can indeed play the violin. There be in this great packet of joy, violins, keyboards and piano, Uilleann Pipes, whistles and low whistles, guitars and mandolins, harps and believe it or not a choir. I have to give you a quote from the composer Rolf Lovland. "Somewhere within us all there is a secret garden. A garden in which we can seek refuge when times are rough, or retire to in joy or contemplation. For years I have visited my own secret garden in search of organic harmony and melody. The songs on this CD are some of what I've found. A year ago, I met an artist who through soulful simplicity of her instrument gave my songs a voice. She is the famed Irish violinist Fionnuala Sherry. Together we have tended the secret garden and the crop is here for the picking...... Soooo on your next sojourn to the music you go find "The Secret Garden" by Rolf Lovland under the Philips label and give yourself a treat. I know this isn't Civil War History, but it seems to have caught your fancy so with your indulgence I'll continue to dabble here.... Heh Heh I do looooove my music...

“MY APOLOGIES” for sending last week’s newsletter out in the “Clear”. Heh Heh That certainly put out 6 extra pages of gibberish.... That’s the first time I’ve sent the newsletter out with the distribution as CC rather than BCC in two years. Oh well, Senior Moments Abound!!!!!!!!!!!! Heh Heh There was a good response though.... Read Betty’s note about finding a niece in the address list down in “ A Bit of Community”.... Go Figure :-)

This Thursday night is "The Border Wars". I've taken a special interest in Missouri's history leading up to and including the Civil War period as that is the land that formed me and where my roots reside. So I have a neat story for you..... Come join us.

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU :-)..... 
COME AGAIN, WE "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY.... 

The continuing series I'm putting in the newsletter under the HELP DESK, is on the Civil War Military 
Records which can be found at, or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers 
(FHCs)........ So many of you have been astonished that those records are available through the FHCs, that we thought this would be of worth in your research.... 

************************************************************************************* 

THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". 
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the 
New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters". 
************************************************************************************* 
U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers............................. 

The next stage of this series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records 
available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

Specific Union Sources........................... 

Union Army soldiers may have served in the U.S. Army, local militia units mustered into federal service, 
or volunteer regiments raised by the individual states. The length of service varied from 90 days to three 
years. Many soldiers also re-enlisted serving in more than one regiment. The Union Army and Navy 
enlisted over 2.3 million men, of which nearly 359,000 died in combat or from wounds and disease. 

Union Service Records 

Service Records of Soldiers. - There is currently no master index to the names of soldiers who served in 
Union volunteer regiments. (Note from the editor: A Union Soldiers Roster is in the making by Broadfoot 
Publishing. It's up to 13 volumes as this writing, but it's still incomplete.) Individual indexes to state 
volunteer regiments are available on microfilm for every Northern state and every Southern state except 
South Carolina. Most service records have not been microfilmed and are available only at the National 
Archives. The following service records and indexes are available on microfilm at the National Archives 
and the Family History Libraries........ 

........... continued. 

Veteran and Lineage Organization Records

The Grand Army of the Republic. this was the major veterans' organization after the war. It reached its largest membersip in the 1890s with about 400,000 members. Below is a published history of the organization with biographical sketches of national and state officials:

"Beath, Robert B. Hsitory of the Grand Army of the Republic." New York: Bryan, Taylor a& Co., 1889. (FHL book 973 M2bea; film 1.320,710, item 2.)

Local post or chapter records may be found at historical societies and state archives. The Family History Library has records for......
Iowa (FHL 69 films; FHLC computer number 238654).
Michigan (FHL 76 films; FHLC computer number 277155).
Nebraska (FHL 2 films; FHLC computer number 527157).
To find specific microfilm numbers with the Family History Library Catalog on microfiche, search the Locality section under [STATE] - SOCIETIES.

The Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War. 1861-65. This organization was established in 1885. The address of their library and museum is .....
Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War
503 S. Walnut Street
Springfield, IL. 62704

Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War. This society has a grave registration committee that marks graves of Civil War veterans. The address is.....
Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War
c/o James T. Lyons, Secretary
411 Bartlett Street
Lansing, MI 48915

.......................to be continued (NOTE: next week will start with the Confederate sources....)
***********************************************************************************
A “News Flash” on Civil War Info from the POW Network
From: rosewebb@datasync.com (Rose C. Webb)

Advocacy And Intelligence Index
For Prisoners Of War/Missing In Action, Inc. (AIIPOWMIAI)
Bob Necci and Andi Wolos

THE POW/MIA E-MAIL NETWORK (c)
aiioct14.98b

State Civil War soldiers unknown no more. POWs who died in Indiana to get Tennessee "burial"
By Sue McClure, Staff Writer, Tennessean

SPRING HILL, Tenn. - Come Friday, Tim Morrison will load seven
half-gallon jars of dirt into his car and drive to Indiana so 38 Tennessee
Confederate soldiers who died in a prisoner of war camp in 1862
can be covered with some of their native soil. Morrison, a guide at the Civil
War-era Rippavilla mansion and commander of the Sons of Confederate
Veterans Camp No. 152 in Fayetteville, collected the soil form each of
the soldiers' home counties - Williamson, Giles, Marshall, Lincoln,
Bedford, Lawrence and Franklin.
The native ground will be used to honor the dead during a 1 p.m.
dedication ceremony Saturday in Greenbush Cemetery in Lafayette, Ind.,
where Morrison is the keynote speaker. The ceremony culminates more than
two years of diligent research by Morrison to identify the men who, after
their surrender at Fort Donelson, endured a grueling steamboat and rail
trip to Lafayette, but failed to survive their temporary confinement 
there in a local meatpacking house. Until now, their graves have identified
them simply as "Unknown, C.S.A."
"These poor fellows had been fighting for three days out in the
snow and ice prior to the surrender of Feb. 16 of Fort Donelson,"
Morrison said. "The ones who wound up in Lafayette, they're all Southern
Middle Tennessee boys, so being up there fighting in and around Kentucky, that
was pretty far north for them."
The massive surrender at Fort Donelson left the Union Army with
about 13,000 POWs and no facilities or procedures to handle them. The 38
Middle Tennesseans who died were buried in Greenbush Cemetery by the
townsfolk. On Saturday, 38 Civil War reenactors will stage a roll call
of honor, stepping forward as each name of the Confederate dead is read, and
saying, "Died honorably for my country."
A monument honoring the 38 also will be unveiled. Descendants of
the Confederate dead are encouraged to attend the ceremony.

{{{Rosie}}} Thanks Sis, great bit of news :-)
***********************************************************************************
DID YOU KNOW?? ................................... 
Excerpts from various areas of documented history or family journels........ 

I'm sure many of you went to see "The Dead Poets Society" with Robin Williams. That was one of my favorites. The ending scene of the movie showed the students that were in "William's" class supporting him by standing on the desks and saying "O Captain My Captain". Well I thought it would please you to hear the words that attend that statement. It was written about Lincoln's death.

O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done,
The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won,
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring;
But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up -- for you the flag is flung -- for you the bugle trills,
For you bouquets and ribbon'd wreaths -- for you the shores a-crowding,
Her Captain! dear father!
This arm beneath your head!
It is some dream that on the deck,
You've fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still,
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will,
The ship is anchor'd safe and sound, its voyage closed and done,
From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won;
Exult O shores, and ring O bells!
But I with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

Walt Whitman (1819 - 1892)
************************************************************************************
A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................ 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of 
Interest and Pleas for HELP................ 
************************************************************************************
Jayne picked this up and sent me a copy..... 

ALL GOOD THINGS

He was in the first third grade class I taught at Saint Mary's School 
in Morris, Minn. All 34 of my students were dear to me, but Mark 
Eklund was one in a million. Very neat in appearance, but had that 
happy-to-be-alive attitude that made even his occasional mischievousness delightful.

Mark talked incessantly. I had to remind him again and again that
talking without permission was not acceptable. What impressed me so
much, though, was his sincere response every time I had to correct him
for misbehaving - "Thank you for correcting me, Sister!"

I didn't know what to make of it at first, but before long I became
accustomed to hearing it many times a day.

One morning my patience was growing thin when Mark talked once too
often, and then I made a novice-teacher's mistake. I looked at Mark
and said, "If you say one more word, I am going to tape your mouth 
shut!"

It wasn't ten seconds later when Chuck blurted out, "Mark is talking
again." I hadn't asked any of the students to help me watch Mark, but
since I had stated the punishment in front of the class, I had to act
on it.

I remember the scene as if it had occurred this morning. I walked to
my desk, very deliberately opened by drawer and took out a roll of
masking tape. Without saying a word, I proceeded to Mark's desk, tore
off
two pieces of tape and made a big X with them over his mouth. I then
returned to the front of the room.

As I glanced at Mark to see how he was doing, he winked at me. That
did it!! I started laughing. The class cheered as I walked back to
Mark's desk, removed the tape, and shrugged my shoulders. His first
words were, "Thank you for correcting me, Sister."

At the end of the year, I was asked to teach junior-high math. The
years flew by, and before I knew it Mark was in my classroom again.
He was more handsome than ever and just as polite. Since he had to
listen carefully to my instruction in the "new math," he did not talk 
as much in ninth grade as he had in third. One Friday, things just 
didn't feel right. We had worked hard on a new concept all week, and I 
sensed that the students were frowning, frustrated with themselves - and edgy
with one another. I had to stop this crankiness before it got out of
hand. So I asked them to list the names of the other students in the room on
two sheets of paper, leaving a space between each name. Then I told
them to think of the nicest thing they could say about each of their
classmates and write it down. It took the remainder of the class
period to finish their assignment, and as the students left the room,
each one handed me the papers. Charlie smiled.

Mark said, "Thank you for teaching me, Sister. Have a good weekend."

That Saturday, I wrote down the name of each student on a separate
sheet of paper, and I listed what everyone else had said about that
individual. On Monday I gave each student his or her list. Before
long, the entire class was smiling. "Really?" I heard whispered. "I
never knew that meant anything to anyone!" "I didn't know others
liked me so much." No one ever mentioned those papers in class again. 
I never knew if they discussed them after class or with their parents, 
but it didn't matter. The exercise had accomplished its purpose. The
students were happy with themselves and one another again.

That group of students moved on. Several years later, after I
returned from vacation, my parents met me at the airport. As we were
driving home, Mother asked me the usual questions about the trip - the
weather, my experiences in general. There was a lull in the
conversation.

Mother gave Dad a side-ways glance and simply says, "Dad?" My father
cleared his throat as he usually did before something important. "The
Eklunds called last night," he began. "Really?" I said. "I haven't
heard from them in years. I wonder how Mark is."

Dad responded quietly. "Mark was killed in Vietnam," he said. "The
funeral is tomorrow, and his parents would like it if you could attend."

To this day I can still point to the exact spot on I-494 where Dad
told me about Mark.

I had never seen a serviceman in a military coffin before. Mark
looked so handsome, so mature. All I could think at that moment was,
Mark I would give all the masking tape in the world if only you would
talk to me.

The church was packed with Mark's friends. Chuck's sister sang "The
Battle Hymn of the Republic." Why did it have to rain on the day of
the funeral? It was difficult enough at the graveside. The pastor 
said the usual prayers, and the bugler played taps. One by one those who
loved Mark took a last walk by the coffin and sprinkled it with holy
water. I was the last one to bless the coffin. As I stood there, one of the
soldiers who acted as pallbearer came up to me. "Were you Mark's math
teacher?" he asked. I nodded as I continued to stare at the coffin.
"Mark talked about you a lot," he said.

After the funeral, most of Mark's former classmates headed to Chuck's
farmhouse for lunch. Mark's mother and father were there, obviously
waiting for me. "We want to show you something," his father said,
taking a wallet out of his pocket. "They found this on Mark when he
was killed. We thought you might recognize it."

Opening the billfold, he carefully removed two worn pieces of notebook
paper that had obviously been taped, folded and refolded many times.
I knew without looking that the papers were the ones on which I had
listed all the good things each of Mark's classmates had said about 
him.

"Thank you so much for doing that," Mark's mother said. "As you can
see, Mark treasured it."

Mark's classmates started to gather around us. Charlie smiled rather
sheepishly and said, "I still have my list. It's in the top drawer of
my desk at home." Chuck's wife said, "Chuck asked me to put his in
our wedding album."

"I have mine too," Marilyn said. "It's in my diary."

Then Vicki, another classmate, reached into her pocketbook, took out
her wallet and showed her worn and frazzled list to the group. "I 
carry this with me at all times," Vicki said without batting an eyelash. "I
think we all saved our lists."

That's when I finally sat down and cried. I cried for Mark and for
all his friends who would never see him again.

THE END

Written by: Sister Helen P. Mrosla

{{{Jayne}}} No further words are necessary! LEAVE A MARK!!
*************************************************************************************
From: AvalonPark

Thanks again for all you do to make Thursday nights so memorable. The stories and comments are all so interesting and the last story of "The Beginning of A Military Tradition", was to much! One can only imagine the heartache that dreadful war brought to so many people.

{{AvalonPark}} Your response is the “Salary” that gives us the incentive to “Keep On Keeping On”! 
*************************************************************************************
From: BettyLAtw
Jim-
Thank you for printing the whole list as CC instead of BCC. I now know that a niece of mine is subscribing :-). But no one else that I am personally acquainted with :-( although I do recognize a few screen names.

I truly enjoy reading your newsletter although seldom get to your Thurs evening chat.

{{{Betty}}} Ha Ha Ha !!! That was a GREAT feedback to my “Goof Up”!! I never do a CC on purpose as that results in about 5 pages of unintelligable gibberish, and it is meant to maintain the anonymous nature to screen names most members desire. I’m glad you found your niece, but I probably won’t do that again... Heh Heh Can you believe how many folks get this newsletter?? It flabberghasts me :-)
*************************************************************************************
From: SCSunset

Jim, I really enjoy the online newsletter very much. It is a great joy to be able to read it when its convienient and is something to savor. I have been passing it along to a friend who is not on aol. Could you add him to your mailing list even though he is on another ISP??. He really enjoys the letter as he is a Confederate historian and Editor.

Keep up the great things you are doing, we appreciate it.
Shelby

{{{Shelby}}} Heh Heh! I got your second note with his name and he is now on distribution. :-) For your information, about 200 on distribution aren’t on AOL but have asked to be put on distribution. Some have even come over to join us... That’s a good feeling. We must be doing something right :-)
*************************************************************************************
From: Kujen

Hi - 
My computer crashed 3 times while trying to read this week's email 11/9/98. I have a power macintosh but have never had any trouble before. Could the message be too long? Could you try sending half?
I cannot go for over a week without reading your newsletter. The best!

“Kujen” - Oh Lord!! Try this one and let me know what happens.... I’ll send you an email as well... Thanks for the nice feedback :)
*************************************************************************************
Subj: Cemetery being demolished!!
From: GFA Robin
This letter should be forwarded to everyone you can think of. Our cemeteries all over are in danger and this must be stopped. Here is a copy of what I sent to the e-mail address at the bottom of the article. Feel free to use any or all of it in your own letters.

Dear Sir,
I am writing this letter to express my concern for the cemetery that is being destroyed, all in the name of progress. Much like the Native American Burial grounds and the graves of famous Americans are protected from such monstrosities, so should all family cemeteries be. These small cemeteries are a part of our past, our heritage. They teach and educate us as to who we are and where we came from. Destroying these cemeteries is the same as destroying the rich history buried within and making these founders of America seem unimportant. Nothing could be further from the truth. Each of our ancestors played an important part in making America what it is today. While they may not rank as "famous", their roles in America were the ones that helped the "famous" Americans become what they were/are. All of the great Americans came from humble beginnings and these are the people that are buried in the cemeteries that are being or may be destroyed in the future. They should be as respected in death as they were in life. 
Please send this to the appropriate parties involved in this case, or provide me with the names and addresses of whom I should send this.
Thank you for your time.

Robin Helman

At 11:39 AM 11/6/98 +0400, you wrote:
>One of the MS CC's posted this this morning on the state list, and granted
>permission to post it here. 
>
>Thanks,
>Ellen
>
>>Please take a look at the following article. It is about one woman's
>>fight against a developer, who is demolishing a family burial plot, and
>>disregarding a legal deed that provided for the plot forever... I'm
>>not sure what any of us can do to help, but in spreading the word we may
>>find some help for her. I have her e-mail address if someone can help.
>>
>>http://www.sunherald.com/news/docs/grave101898.htm
>>Peggy Hall

{{{Robin}}} Thanks for the heads UP...
*************************************************************************************
From: AUPSHAW1

> Andy has been in the hospital since October 25th, and will not be getting 
> out for another two weeks. I am printing all of his mail for him to read 
> when he is able. I am also sure that he will get in touch with all of you as 
> soon as he possibly can. 

{{{Penny}}} Jayne forwarded your note to me. You tell Andy, he’s in our prayers and thoughts and we wish him a speedy recovery. I thought I’d put this in the newsletter, so others can drop him a note as well. :-) God Bless!!
*************************************************************************************
IMPORTANT For w/o Fireside - Fwd: Civil War Document found,
From: FI WATROUS
-----------------
Forwarded Message: 
Subj: Civil War Document found, it needs a home.........
Date: 98-11-04 10:30:13 EST
From: RV4cats@aol.com

The following description is a document recently found hidden in a picture
frame bought at a yard sale in Arizona. If anyone has connections to this
Mark CROSBY, Jr., contact me privately and I will forward the name of the
fellow genealogist currently in possession. She would like to have it in the
proper hands.
Cynthia

===========================================
Civil War Discharge Paper
For: Mark CROSBY, Jr.
Private, Company B, 16th Regiment
Union Army
From Yarmouth, Massachussetts
Entered service in 1860 and left service 1864
Marked Paid and signed by B. McCONNELL

Description:
5 ft. 3 inches, gray eyes, dark curly hair.
He was a clerk in the Union Army.

Entered in the Auditors records on July 26, 1870
This document bears the Union Crest.
=================================================

{{{Ike & Jayne}}} Thanks for the heads up. If any of you readers connect to this NOTICE, Please get in touch with Cynthia at her email address RV4cats@aol.com. Let us know if there are any hits out there and we’ll celebrate with you on a fantastic find..... :)
*************************************************************************************

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT…………. 

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of. 

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate 
one Thursday a month to the sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; 
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, 
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on 
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly 
Fireside." 

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from 
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- 
haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events****** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFS Jayne and GFS Jim 
and our many fill-in friends :) 


11/19/98 - "Border Wars" - GFS Jim "Many have asked for this again so here it is."

11/26/98 - OPEN CHAT" Happy Thanksgiving all.....

12/3/98 - "The Story of a Campaign by Mark Twain" - GFS Jim

12/10/98 - "Letters, Songs and Poems Night"

12/17/98 - "OPEN CHAT"

12/24/98 - "MERRY CHRISTMAS" To allow all of you to enjoy your Christmas time with Family, Your 
HOST's are taking Christmas Eve OFF. And we're gonna be funnin around with our Families as well. 

We'll See You Thursday Night……….! 
Your Hosts 
GFS Jayne, GFH TEG and GFS Jim

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group 
Distribution Coast to Coast 
Week ending 22 November 1998

What a fine time Thursday telling the tale of "The Border Wars". The agonizing conflict of Missouri in the 1840s and then the conflict with Kansas Territory going into the Civil War. Twas a sad tale, but one we shouldn’t forget. What do we learn from if not from our mistakes..... 

Veteran’s Day was the 11th of November and Thanksgiving will be here this week. Sooo check “A Bit of Community” for a tribute to our Veteran’s so that when Thanksgiving arrives on Thursday, you will have another item to add to your “Thank You” list.

This Thursday is THANKSGIVING DAY. The room will be open, but your lovin Hosts/Hostess will whooping it up with our families. We may get in, but then we may not... Heh Heh You know how Grand Chillins are.... And THIS Grandpa is just gonna “Eat um Up”!!!!!! HAPPY THANKSGIVING to all of you from US !! GFS Jayne, GFH TEG, and GFS Jim..... May your day be the best memory you’ve had yet.... :)

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU :-)..... 
COME AGAIN, WE "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY.... 

The continuing series I'm putting in the newsletter under the HELP DESK, is on the Civil War Military 
Records which can be found at, or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers 
(FHCs)........ So many of you have been astonished that those records are available through the FHCs, that we thought this would be of worth in your research.... 

************************************************************************************* 
THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". 
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the 
New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters". 

New Postings since last we talked :-) History of Danville Prison (GFS Jim); Civil War Veterans Listing from Colerain Township, Ohio (Linda Ebersole); Extracts from Mustering Out Rolls taken from Fox’s Regimental Losses (CivilWar49). These are all in Civil War Files. Needless to say the Letters, Songs and Poems have been posted as well as the “Fireside Tales” (Lectures).
************************************************************************************* 
U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers............................. 

The next stage of this series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records 
available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

FINALLY Specific Confederate Sources........................... 

Records of the Confederate Army are located in the National Archives, state archives, and historical societies. Records at the National Archives will be discussed in this outline. For state service records, such as Alabama’s “Confederate Service Records”, 1861-1865 (FHL 67 films; FHLC computer number 482117), see the state research outlines.

SERVICE RECORDS
Service Records of Soldiers. The compiled service records for all Confederate soldiers have been indexed and microfilmed. The following is a master index to the compiled service records of Confederate enlisted soldiers and officers:

“Consolidated Index to Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers.” National Archives Microfilm Publication M253. (FHL films 191, 127-661; FHLC computer number 323922.)

The records have also been indexed by state. The records and indexes available at the National Archives and Family History Library are:

Alabama. “Compiled Service Records”, National Archives Publication M311 (FHL films 880, 330-837; FHLC computer number 379341) and “Index”, National Archives Microfilm Publication M374 (FHL films 821,949-97; FHLC computer number 328758).

Arizona. “Compiled Service Records”, National Archives Publication M318 (FHL films 536,241) and “Index”, National Archives Microfilm Publication M375 (FHL films 821,837

Arkansas. “Compiled Service Records”, National Archives Publication M317 (FHL films 880, 849-881,104; FHLC computer number 378694) and “Index”, National Archives Microfilm Publication M376 (FHL films 821,811-36; FHLC computer number 378694).

Florida. “Compiled Service Records”, National Archives Publication M251 (FHL films 880, 103-206; FHLC computer number 374150) and “Index”, National Archives Microfilm Publication M225 (FHL films 880,001-09; FHLC computer number 374150).

Georgia. “Compiled Service Records”, National Archives Publication M266 (FHL films 1,499,064-670; FHLC computer number 437571) and “Index”, National Archives Microfilm Publication M226 (FHL films 821,700-66; FHLC computer number 381928).

Kentucky. “Compiled Service Records”, National Archives Publication M319 (FHL films 1,447,468-603; FHLC computer number 395864) and “Index”, National Archives Microfilm Publication M377 (FHL films 881,380-93; FHLC computer number 278163).

Louisiana. “Compiled Service Records”, National Archives Publication M320 (FHL films 1,447,604-975; 1,473,206-44; FHLC computer number 432698) and “Index”, National Archives Microfilm Publication M378 (FHL films 881,457-87; FHLC computer number 279612).

.......................Confederate Compiled Service Resords to be continued
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Sites From: MMeadPond

Primary Sources
HI, 
I just thought I'd pass this your way. It's at the "New York State and the Civil War" page at:
http://www.snymor.edu/pages/library/local_history/sites/ 
maintained by Sue Greenhagen

When I saw the letters and diaries, I thought of you folks.
Mosey

{{{Mosey}}} Bless your heart. You’re ever vigilant for us :D THANKS
***********************************************************************************
DID YOU KNOW?? ................................... 
Excerpts from various areas of documented history or family journals........ 

There was nothing pro forma about the firing on Fort Sumter. In thirty-four hours, the little island fortress in Charleston Harbor was shelled into submission. A few words from its commander, Major robert Anderson, effectively give the picture. He described quarters “entirely burned, the main gates destroyed by fire, the gorge walls seriously impaired, the [powder] magazine surrounded by flames and its door closed from the effects of the heat.
By then, April 13, 1861, the Federal garrison’s only provision was pork and only “four barrels and three cartridges of powder” were accessible because of the jammed door to the fort’s magazine. Outside the bar the Federal resupply ships whose deployment had finally triggered the war’s start merely stood by as Sumter suffered bombardment, their commanders unwilling to sacrifice ships or men to a now-hopeless rescue mission.
It was on the evening of April 13 that Anderson agreed to surrender. “The fort was a scene of ruin and destruction,” wrote its U.S. Army surgeon Samuel Crawford later. “for 34 hours it had sustained a bombardment from seventeen 10-inch mortars and heavy guns, well placed and well served.”
the moment of the inevitable at last had come, he noted. Pierre G. T. Beauregard, later hailed as the hero of Charleston, wrote of the end in calm, simple terms: “The flag over Fort Sumter at last was lowered, and a white flag substituted for it. The contest was over. Major Anderson had acknowledged his defeat.”
While no one on either side was killed in this first real exchange of gunfire in the Civil War, former U.S. Representative Roger A. Pryor of Virginia -- now a Confederate colonel -- almost became a casualty. Sent to Sumter as one of Beauregard’s surrender negotiators, Pryor took a seat at a table in the dark dispensary and, feeling quite thirsty, poured himself a drink from a black bottle on the table without thinking much about what he was doing.
As it turned out, he gulped down a poisonous compound, iodide of potassium. Doctor Crawford quickly pumped his stomach and probably saved Pryor’s life, which raises a few questions.
“Some of us,” wrote Union Captain Abner Doubleday, “questioned the doctor’s right to interpose himself in a case of this kind.” The thought was, “If any Rebel leader chose to come over to Fort Sumter and poison himself, the Medical Department had not business to interfere.”
Crawford, though, and a well-nigh unassailable response, according to Doubleday. Since the good doctor was responsible for all his medicine as Federal government property, “he could not permit Pryor to carry any of it away.”

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................ 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of 
Interest and Pleas for HELP................ 
************************************************************************************
“To Those Who Serve!!!!!”

WHAT IS A VETERAN?
Some veterans bear visible signs of their service: a missing limb, a jagged scar, a certain look in the eye. Others may carry the evidence inside them: a pin holding a bone together, a piece of shrapnel in the leg or perhaps another sort of inner steel: the soul's ally forged in the refinery of adversity. Except in parades, however, the men and women who have kept America safe wear no badge or emblem. 
You can't tell a vet just by looking. What is a vet? He is the cop on the beat who spent six months in Saudi Arabia sweating two gallons a day making sure the armored personnel carriers didn't run out of fuel.
He is the barroom loudmouth, dumber than five wooden planks, Whose overgrown frat-boy behavior is outweighed a hundred times in the cosmic scales by four hours of exquisite bravery near the 38th parallel.
She - or he - is the nurse who fought against futility and went to sleep sobbing every night for two solid years in Da Nang.
He is the POW who went away one person and came back another - or didn't come back AT ALL.
He is the Quantico drill instructor who has never seen combat - but has saved countless lives by turning slouchy, no-account rednecks and gang members into Marines, and teaching them to watch each other's backs.
He is the carrier pilot landing on a rolling, pitching, heaving flight deck during a rain squall in the pitch-black night of the Tonkin Gulf.
He is the parade-riding Legionnaire who pins on his ribbons and medals with a prosthetic hand.
He is the career quartermaster (Army Supply Corps) who watches the ribbons and medals pass him by.
He is the Army Ranger who humps endless miles of burning sand for three days with no sleep or food and very little water to designate targets for laser guided bombs or swims through a disease infested swamp and crawls over poisonous snakes under the cover of darkness to conduct intelligence on a foreign government hostile to our own and our cherished way of life.
He is the three anonymous heroes in The Tomb Of The Unknowns, whose presence at the Arlington National Cemetery must forever preserve the memory of all the anonymous heroes whose valor dies unrecognized with them on the battlefield or in the ocean's sunless deep.
He is the old guy bagging groceries at the supermarket - palsied now and aggravatingly slow - who helped liberate a Nazi death camp and who wishes all day long that his wife were still alive to hold him when the nightmares come.
He is an ordinary and yet an extraordinary human being - a person who offered some of his life's most vital years in the service of his country, and who sacrificed his ambitions so others would not have to
sacrifice theirs.
He is a soldier and a savior and a sword against the darkness, and he is nothing more than the finest, greatest testimony on behalf of the finest, greatest nation ever known.
So remember, each time you see someone who has served our country, just lean over and say Thank You. That's all most people need, and in most cases it will mean more than any medals they could have been awarded or were awarded.

Two little words that mean a lot, "THANK YOU". Wednesday, November 11th was Veterans' Day.
**********************
"It is the soldier, not the reporter, Who has given us freedom of the press. 
It is the soldier, not the poet, Who has given us freedom of speech. 
It is the soldier, not the campus organizer, Who has given us the freedom to demonstrate. 
It is the soldier, Who salutes the flag, Who serves beneath the flag, And whose coffin is draped by the flag, Who allows the protestor to burn the flag." 

Father Denis Edward O'Brien, USMC
**********************
(United States Military Academy West Point, New York)
1998 Veterans Day Speech

I want to ask all of the veterans with us here today to stand up. Ladies and gentlemen, let's recognize these distinguished Americans.
Some of our veterans are easy to recognize. They wear uniforms, medals, and ribbons. Most veterans, however, live among us quietly and anonymously. They are America's own sons and daughters. Let's consider for a moment the question, "Who is a veteran?"
A veteran is an elderly gentleman sitting on a park bench, who helped liberate a Nazi concentration camp.
A veteran is the grizzled service station mechanic, who showed extraordinary courage at the 38th parallel.
A veteran is the nurse taking care of newborns in a hospital nursery, who once bandaged burned and bloody limbs at Da Nang.
A veteran is a POW, who once returned home to face a culture he didn't recognize and now finds himself able at last to tell his story to his adult children.
A veteran is a police officer driving her patrol car through the neighborhood, who spent 6 months in Saudi Arabia making sure armored personnel carriers didn't run out of fuel.
On Veterans Day, we honor all people who served in our Armed Forces. But those of us here today have come to pay special tribute to Army veterans.
They stand proudly in the timeline of history. Many war heroes and visionary military leaders stand in this line of selfless service.
Some bear visible signs of their bravery and service-a missing limb, a jagged scar. Others carry inner signs-a pin holding a bone together; a piece of shrapnel in the leg. Perhaps the steel inside is part of a
soldier's character, a soul forged and shapedose who gave up their lives in service to the nation. They and their families deserve our highest praise and eternal gratitude. We remember and salute all fallen heroes today and thank their families for their ultimate sacrifice.
But a "veteran" is not only someone who fought in a war. Listen to the words of a staff sergeant who served during DESERT STORM:

"I greatly admire and respect my heroes and friends in the desert for their courage, stamina, and superb performance during the STORM. Yet, let's not discount the accomplishments of all who stayed back in the garrisons and training fields in America. We also served, yet in ways that don't grab headlines. We kept on doing what we are paid to do-training soldiers. We played a critical role in caring for the families left behind. We helped ensure that thousands of Guard and Reserve soldiers were fit to fight. We took on the rear-area workload, which needed to be done right." 

These are powerful words and true ones. And let's not forget to honor the many other veterans who served during peacetime and those who deployed during operations other than war.
All soldiers commit to putting their lives on the line. As we saw in Mogadishu, Somalia, and at the American Embassy at Nairobi, Kenya, soldiers die in operations other than war. All soldiers train and
maintain a constant state of readiness so that whenever the nation needs them, they are ready to serve and, if necessary, to fight and die for their country.
Therefore, on Veterans Day, we recognize and honor the many veterans who supported our warfighters as well as all soldiers who served during peacetime. We recognize the fullest possible definition of the term "veteran" as "any person who has served in the armed forces-past and present, at home and abroad, in peacetime and in war; and on active duty, in the Army Reserve, and in the Army National Guard." We honor the today, as we have for 79 years.
The tradition of honoring America's veterans began after 116,000 members of our fighting forces died in World War I, a conflict then known as "the Great War" or "the War To End All Wars," though sadly, that was not to be. In 1919, President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed November 11 as
"Armistice Day." His intention was to honor the valiant forces who fought and died in one of the most costly and bitter wars ever fought. It was his hope, and the dream of all Americans then, that the world would afterward be "safe for democracy." A bright dream it was, but sadly, an elusive one, as we now know from history-the need for a strong fighting force emerged again and again in the decades following the proclamation of the first Armistice Day.
During the first half of our century, Americans clearly understood the importance of honoring those who served. Most American families had personal experiences with the Army. They or members of their families served in the military. Some volunteered, and others were drafted into service. In 1954, Congress broadened the scope of the national holiday honoring our military and renamed it "Veterans Day."
A superb all-volunteer Army now proudly serves our nation and has done so since 1973. However, the number of Americans with military service is declining. Today, we have the smallest Army in over 50 years. Unlike past periods in our history, many Members of Congress have not served in the military. In times of economic prosperity, fewer young people view the Army as their best opportunity to advance.
Americans unfamiliar with the proud history of their Army often have little or no familiarity with the contributions of soldiers. Hard as it might be to believe, many Americans today have never met a
soldier.
Therefore, it is time for those of us who DO understand the importance of the Army, who DO know what it means to serve, who DO know the quality and character of the American soldier firsthand-
to help reconnect the American soldier to the American people. It is important to make all Americans aware of the contributions and importance of their Army, to tell soldier stories.
Here are some facts about our Army today. Today's Army is a full spectrum force, the best Army in the world, able to fight and win wars and to stand firm for peace as the ensurer of global stability. All of our soldiers are trained and ready to deploy and perform their missions during the nation's wars when called on to do so. In addition to maintaining battlefield readiness and upholding the Army's long-term commitments worldwide, our soldiers are performing numerous vital and diverse missions at home and abroad.
Today, the line of selfless service stretches around the globe. During the past year, soldiers in America's Army have deployed to over 100 countries. Over 100,000 soldiers have been stationed in foreign lands. At this time, there are over 25,000 American soldiers deployed to more than 70 countries, as part of joint and combined operations and exercises.
In Europe, more than 7,000 American soldiers are deployed in Bosnia, Hungary, Italy, and Croatia, in support of Operation JOINT FORGE. In enforcing the Dayton Peace Accord, they are nurturing fledgling democracies in post Cold War Europe and helping to rebuild villages ripped apart by civil wars. Validating these efforts are the recent peaceful elections in that region, a result of close relationships built between American soldiers and local officials and citizens.
Also in Europe, soldiers are helping to solidify peace through Partnership for Peace initiatives. In Romania and Latvia, in Lithuania and Bulgaria,our soldiers are showing the armies of these nations how a military functions in a democracy. At the Marshall Center in Garmisch, Germany, former Soviet and Warsaw Pact officers are being introduced to the practices of a democracy.
In Africa, our soldiers are part of the African Crisis Response Initiative, a training plan to prepare African military units to support limited peacekeeping or humanitarian relief operations on their
continent.
In Asia, soldiers are helping to heal the wounds of the past by taking part in Joint Task Force-Full Accounting, an effort to determine the fate of members of our armed forces killed or missing in action in Vietnam and Cambodia.
At various locations worldwide, soldiers are working as part of humanitarian demining operations. Their goal is to help prevent further deaths and maimings of innocent people, many of them children, who are present victims of past conflicts.
In Latin America, as part of Joint Task Force Bravo, our soldiers have supported humanitarian missions in Honduras since 1984. They are building trust and cooperation through medical training missions and regional cooperative security programs. Soldiers drill wells and build roads, schools, and health clinics.
In Haiti, veterans, on their own free time and with no pay, started the School of Hope to teach English to Haitians.
At home, veterans perform vital missions during disasters. Ask them what they've done in the past couple of years. In the Pacific Northwest and in Florida, soldiers in the Army Reserve or the Army 
National Guard will talk about fighting fires. In the Midwest, soldiers will speak of aiding flood victims and providing relief supplies and logistical support. 
In the South, they will talk about helping during and after hurricanes.
In New England and upstate New York, veterans will speak of delivering medical supplies, transportation support, and emergency power during the Winter Storm of '98. Nationwide, they might tell you about their work with the Army Civil Works Program, producing 25 percent of our 
nation's hydropower and providing water to about 10 million people.
Veterans are also making a difference in our Junior ROTC programs, teaching our young people about patriotism, leadership skills, and responsibility. Veterans volunteer as firefighters and emergency
medical technicians and work in literacy programs.

[Army Core Values]
What is it that inspires and enables ordinary citizens to rise to the challenge of battle, to be willing to make the ultimate sacrifice of their lives in service to their country? What is it that motivates them to respond and contribute wherever and whenever they are called on to do so?
The answer is contained within a single concept-the Army core values. 
The proud legacy of our Army is grounded in these values:
Loyalty-the code of the American soldier is to bear true faith and allegiance to the U.S. Constitution, the Army, the unit, and other soldiers;
Duty-the code of the American soldier is to fulfill obligations;
Respect-the code of the American soldier is to treat people as they should be treated;
Selfless-Service-the code of the American soldier is to put the welfare of the nation, the Army, and subordinates before his or her own;
Honor-the code of the American soldier is to live up to all of the Army's values;
Integrity-the code of the American soldier is to do what's right, legally and morally; and
Personal Courage-the code of the American soldier is to face fear, danger, or adversity, whether physical or moral.
Today, these values are the cornerstone of all training our soldiers receive and the standard against which behavior is measured. These are the same values that shaped our Army at Valley Forge, at 
Normandy, in the sands of Kuwait, in the streets of Mogadishu, and at checkpoints in Bosnia. Values are the American soldiers' credentials, just as our soldiers are America's credentials, both at home and around the globe.
So when you leave here today, go out and spread the word. Tell soldier stories to your family, friends, coworkers, and neighbors. Contact your local news media when you hear a soldier story that 
deserves a wider telling. In doing so, you can help reconnect the American people withtheir Army. In doing so, you are helping reconnect them with their legacy, with America's proud history. That history and the Army's are one and inseparable.
We owe all American veterans a profound debt of gratitude. And in particular, we pay tribute to our Army veterans. The freedoms and opportunities we enjoy today were bought and paid for with their
devotion to duty and their sacrifices. Future global stability depends on them.
To all of our veterans we say, "Your contributions and acts of selfless service make a profound difference in our world. We praise you, we honor you, and we thank you."
***********************
In the foundry where I am employed, I am an incentive (piece) worker. I make some good scratch, having 14 years in the business. The quicker I go, the more I make. I belt grind all sorts of hardware in bronze for a multitude of uses (windows, doors, marine, etc.). There is one type of job, however, where I am compelled to slow the pace: I help make the bronze markers that you all have seen in our nations cemeteries.
At times I slow to contemplate what pretty spot my work will end in. Or who will see what a difference it makes on the thin wooden stem of old glory alongside the granite headstone that tells of a life lived. Or how many are in Arlington, or France or Normandy or Africa and the list goes on......
So I dress the points perfect, the bunting flows, stars and olive branches just so.....And the foremost thought running in my mind is this: "Thank you, Hero, for all you gave up for us. I hope I've got it right for you." 
I lose money on this job, and couldn't care less..... God bless 
....John
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Thanks to the contributors - FI WATROUS, BaileyABCE
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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT…………. 

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of. 

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate 
one Thursday a month to the sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; 
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, 
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on 
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly 
Fireside." 

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from 
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- 
haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events****** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFS Jayne, GHF TEG and GFS Jim and our many fill-in friends :) 

11/26/98 - OPEN CHAT" Happy Thanksgiving all.....

12/3/98 - "The Story of a Campaign by Mark Twain" - GFS Jim

12/10/98 - "Letters, Songs and Poems Night"

12/17/98 - "OPEN CHAT"

12/24/98 - "MERRY CHRISTMAS" To allow all of you to enjoy your Christmas time with Family, Your 
HOST's are taking Christmas Eve OFF. And we're gonna be funnin around with our Families as well. 

12/31/98 - “HAPPY NEW YEAR’S EVE” I’m not sure what we’ll do that night. We’re a thinkin.... LOL

We'll See You Thursday Night……….! 
Your Hosts 
GFS Jayne, GFH TEG and GFS Jim

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group 
Distribution Coast to Coast 
Week ending 29 November 1998

HAPPY THANKSGIVING All!! GFS Jayne, GFH TEG and I hope you had great times with family and friends and much Love flowed around :-). We certainly did and I’m “STUFFED”! Heh Heh.. We missed you but I spent a great time with my grandbabies and LOVED IT. Got in BIG Trouble not acting my age as usual. LOL But I’m a Grandpa and that’s what Grandpa’s do...... ROTFLOL

FIWATROUS (Ike and Nancy) sent such a great “Thanksgiving” letter, I thought it appropriate to share with all of you...... I put it in “A Bit Of Community”.... Enjoy..... :-)

This Thursday is a Great Story from Sam Clemmens (Mark Twain). I think you’ll enjoy so come on out and join us....

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU :-)..... 
COME AGAIN, WE "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY.... 

The continuing series I'm putting in the newsletter under the HELP DESK, is on the Civil War Military 
Records which can be found at, or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers 
(FHCs)........ So many of you have been astonished that those records are available through the FHCs, that 
we thought this would be of worth in your research.... 

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THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". 
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the 
New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters". 

New Postings since last we talked :-) Border Wars was already in the Library so help yourself.
************************************************************************************* 
U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers............................. 

The next stage of this series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records 
available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

FINALLY Specific Confederate Sources........................... 

Records of the Confederate Army are located in the National Archives, state archives, and historical societies. Records at the National Archives will be discussed in this outline. For state service records, such as Alabama's "Confederate Service Records", 1861-1865 (FHL 67 films; FHLC computer number 482117), see the state research outlines.

SERVICE RECORDS .........continued

Maryland. "Compiled Service Records", National Archives Publication M321 (FHL films 1,292,663-84; FHLC computer number 110847) and "Index", National Archives Microfilm Publication M379 (FHL films 821,887-88; FHLC computer number 279723).

Mississippi. "Compiled Service Records", National Archives Publication M269 (FHL films 1,488,026-452; FHLC computer number 437580) and "Index", National Archives Microfilm Publication M232 (FHL films 821,838-82; FHLC computer number 382179).

Missouri. "Compiled Service Records", National Archives Publication M322 (FHL films 1,500,030-222; FHLC computer number 437578) and "Index", National Archives Microfilm Publication M380 (FHL films 882,002-17; FHLC computer number 279180).

North Carolina, “Compiled Service Records", National Archives Publication M270 (FHL 580 films 1,381,001-500; 1,447,001-80; FHLC computer number 438816) and "Index", National Archives Microfilm Publication M230 (FHL films 821,768-810; FHLC computer number 326013).

South Carolina. "Compiled Service Records", National Archives Publication M267 (FHL films 1,380,691-95; 1,447,081-467; FHLC computer number 442957) and "Index", National Archives Microfilm Publication M381 (FHL films 881,882-001; FHLC computer number 281240).

Tennessee. "Compiled Service Records", National Archives Publication M268 (FHL films 1,449,671-1,500,028 and 1,527,065; FHLC computer number 437575) and "Index", National Archives Microfilm Publication M231 (FHL films 880,055-102; FHLC computer number 280131).

.......................Confederate Compiled Service Resords to be continued
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From: CMBarker
Hi, Jim...

A couple of interesting sites with info on Black Confederate soldiers:
http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/Bunker/1163/black.html
http://omni.cc.purdue.edu/~markj/1863.html
Mark

Thanks friend Mark!!!!! Good stuff...
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From: Huthut98
Wanted to input the following:
FHC film #s 1,311,589 thru 591, Inclusive,"Civil War Court of Honor"
Deals with names,place of muster,place of action and place of burial.Indexed by surname, and alpha State.
Hutch

Hutch - thanks for the extra information. I didn’t have this set in my notes :-) 
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DID YOU KNOW?? ................................... 
Excerpts from various areas of documented history or family journals........ 

They lived in a columned mansion on a hillside overlooking Washington from the south banks of the Potomac, 1,100 gorgeous acres with an unparalleled view of the Federal city. Unparalleled, too, were their historical ties to the generation that fought and won the American Revolution, the very event that created the city spread before them. Off and on over the years, theirs had been a household bustling with visiting children, kissing cousins and other such relatives, friends, and associates. For here was an abode known for warm gracious living -- a wouldrous stopping place for the visitor to Washington or the traveler to South or North.
But time had taken its usual toll. People died, children grew up and went their ways, other events intervened. And soon, managing her late father’s plantation estate was an aging woman crippled by arthritis and often left alone by her husband’s U.S. Army duty assignments elsewhere.
It was then that Robert E. Lee decided he had better take leave and stay home to help his wife, Mary Custis Lee, manage the inherited Arlington estate built by her late father, George Washington Parke Custis (the grandson of Martha Washington who had been adopted by the widowed Marth’s second husband, George Washington). With the death of Custis in 1857, the mantle of ownership had passed to only child Mary. The Lee children by then were scattered, with two sons serving in the Army like their father, and Robert E. Lee himself stationed far away at San Antonio, Texas.
Once he heard of his father-in-law’s death, Lee -- son of the famous Revolutionary War figure Henry “Light-House Harry” Lee -- took official leave and hurried home. Once there he was shocked at the state of his wife’s health. As she herself had written to a friend, “I almost dread his seeing my crippled state.” She meant her difficulty in walking unassisted, the pain that kept her sleepless at night, her useless right arm and hand.
Lee, a former superintendent of West Point, extended his leave indefinitely to become, in essence, a farmer.
As he took over the reins at Arlington four years before the Civil War began, however, he still was able to accept spot duty with the Army headquartered in nearby Washington. (He crossed the river between -- the Potomac -- via the low-lying wooden span known as the “Long Bridge”.) His temporary duties usually involved dull service such as a seat on a court-martial, but a startling exception to that rule was the tumultuous and historic moment he spent in October 1859 quelling John Brown’s bloody raid at Harper’s Ferry, upstream on the same Potomac that flowed so lazily below Arlington.
For a time during this period, with Lee at home, the great columned house was busy once again with visitors of all kinds -- relatives and friends. In the Federal city below, of course, the final debates over slavery and states’ rights, union versus dis-union, were taking place among the solons of Congress and in the salons and saloons of the politically charged capital city.
After three years at home, Lee finally had to return to Army duty again posted to Texas. Alone again on the Arlington hillside above, Mary Custis Lee was not unaware of what transpired in the city below and in the country at large. With husband Robert gone, she was managing Arlington again, but also maintaining a wary vigil as the momentous events unfolded. And among them came the day, Monday, January 21, 1861, when five Southern Senate members, Mississippi’s Jefferson Davis among them, announced before a packed audience in the Senate galleries that their respective states had seceded. And with that, each gathered his papers from the schoolhouse desks on the chamber’s floor and departed.
Not long after, in February, Mary Custis Lee wrote to daughter Mildred: “The papers are now filled with Mr. Lincoln’s arrival in Washington and this week will, I presume, decide our fate as a nation.” She would be slightly distracted from such momentous national events by the arrival of a son, wife, and grandson for a visit -- son William Fitzhu8gh “Rooney” Lee, wife Charlotte, and “the Boy.”
In the meantime, Texas at last seceded, and Lee was ordered home to Washington to report to the Army’s ranking officer, General Winfield Scott. Lee arrived at Arlington on March 1, and he very shortly faced a momentous personal decision.
“When my husband was summoned to Washington,” his wife later wrote, “where every motive and argument was used to induce him to accept command of the Army destined to invade the South, he was enabled to resist them all, even the sad parting voice of his old Commander (Winfield Scott).
It was almost a week after the fall of Fort Sumter that, by authority of President Lincoln, Lee so famously was offered command of a Federal army charged with subduing the rebellious South. He declined, saying, “Though opposed to secession and deprecating war, I could take no part in an invasion of the Southern States.
After the firing on Fort Sumter. Lee had been distraught in any case, quite unlike the excited, enthused crowds in Richmond. With the offer to command the Union Army and Virginia’s subsequent vote to secede, the heartfelt sadness at Arlington only deepened.
The colonel went into nearby Alexandria on business the mourning of April 19. He returned with a cop of the Alexandria Gazette reporting Virginia’s secession vote and handed it to his wife. He still held out faint hope -- perhaps the report was in error. He knew though, it was not and after their supper together he went alone to his upstairs bedroom. Below Mary Custins Lee listened as he paced the floor above, then heard a mild thump as he fell to his knees in prayer, Below, she also prayed.
Hours later, about midnight, he refoined her. He showed her two letters he had written. In one he resigned his commission in the United States Army. In the other he expressed personal thoughts to General Scott. Later, his wife would write: “My husband has wept tears of blood over this terrible war, but as a man of honor and a Virginian, he must follow the destiny of his State.”
Later still, she also would write: “It was the severest struggle of his life, to resign a commission he had held for 30 years.” More immediately, though, to daughter Mildred again, Mary Custis Lee wrote of her “sad heavy heart” and said: “As I think both parties are wrong in this fratricidal war, there is nothing comforting even in the hope that God may prosper right, for I see no right in the matter.”
The following Sunday, April 21, was the last day and night that Robert E. Lee would spend at Arlington -- for the rest of his life. Summoned to Richmond by Governor John Letcher of Virginia, he left by train out of Alexandria Monday morning. He would not see his wife for another fifteen months.
They both knew at parting that their beloved Arlington estate would fall into Union hands as soon as the defenses were organized around Washington. Neither could remotely guess how quickly that would come or what the final outcome might be, but certainly neither had any idea that in the upheaval of war the grand old Custis home would be turned into a Union cemetery and later into a hallowed, national burial ground, still crowned by those stately columns overlooking the Federal city.
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A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................ 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of 
Interest and Pleas for HELP................ 
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Some Thanksgiving Notes sent in for the Newsletter 
From: FI WATROUS and AslanJ

Thanks for sharing Ike & Nancy and Judy :-) This is what makes the newsletter!!!!!
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Giving Thanks: Our Ancestors....How Much We Love Them!

While doing research on my family lines, I have come to notice the age
of the people of this country. The life span seemed to be fairly short.
The majority of the people that I see as heads of the household are from
23 to 45. There are very few in their 60's and 70's. During the ten to
twelve years before the Civil War our country seemed to be what we
consider today as "young adults" as head of a household. Before that
the lives of these people were extremely busy with land, farming and
raising their families and this was taking it's toll on the young men
and women of that time because it was unbearably hard work for the
farmers and their families. The people that were able to buy land and
invest and be active in the business end of society were marking off
their days on this earth as was the farmer and his wife were without
even knowing it. Life itself was taking it's toll of these bright,
diligent, energetic people. They, for the most part would all be dead
before they reached the age of 50. For an eager nation to grow it took
many miles of road, tunnels, ore, railroads, food, crops for clothing,
livestock, trees, oil and so many other natural resources and various
occupations to supply the needs of it's people. They lived hard lives,
even if it was with a suit of clothes and a tie, shirts with fancy cuffs
and collars or rough-woven durable fabric for the laborers of various
trades and livelyhoods, the pace was hard and fast and worrisome. Most
of those that you see listed in the census reports in their 60's, 70's
or 80's through the 1860 census, were just stronger, healthier and
blessed with longer lives.

After the Civil War there were fewer young men on the census reports.
Most were in their 40s and 50s, some maimed, some crippled, some blind
and many that were strong and healthy in 1861, were spent in the few
years that the war lasted. They came home old men in the conditions of
their bodies and many never regained their health to support their
families by being able to carry the whole load of maintaining their
farms or trades. The sons of those men learned early how to till and
seed the ground, when to harvest, how to manage the few dollars they had
or how to present themselves to borrow on next year's crop before they
were 18 years old. The tradesmen had an advantage over the farmer when
it came to his sons being able to carry on their work, crafty small
hands learned quickly the art of making clothes, shoes and sewing the
leathers for boots, belts, vests, saddles etc. before they were 12. But
the farmer and the blacksmith and the waggoneer and the lumberman had to
hire help until their sons were strong enough to maintain the balance of
the load for their fathers. It was too hard for an 8 year old to lift
wheels, fell trees, use an anvil, and control the horses and oxen and
mules that were needed for those jobs. However, their little minds of
boys 5 and 6 years old when their fathers came home from the war were
keen and open and eager to learn. And learn they did, just as fast and
furiously as they could, and they did what they could until their bodies
caught up to their mental experience and were able to put all their
knowledge into practice.

Those young boys that had to learn from their older family members;
uncles, cousins, grandparents if they were still there for them, those
were the ones that had the hardest challenge.....their father's didn't
come home, their mother's couldn't hold up under the strain and the
daughters had to pitch in and learn the art of making bread, churning,
cooking, cleaning, washing, ironing, sewing...whatever it took to be
there beside their brother or brothers if they were lucky enough to have
them and keep the family together and pushing on and on and on.

These wonderful people are our ancestors. These blessed, faithful,
loving, and yes, some have the occasional traits of hot tempered,
sweaty, foul mouthed...but they are our ancestors. These strong, weak,
frail, stubborn, rough skinned, white skinned, dark skinned, pampered or
leathery people are our ancestors. I am so proud of them. I love them
so much. I wish I could have known each and every one of them, touched
them, listened to them.....just stood in their shadow for a few minutes
because I'll guarantee you one thing, those shadows would have brought
me to my knees knowing how much it covered and what it meant to be a
part of their family.

I have stood and am now standing on their land. I have seen and touched
their trees and their homes. I have smelled their old pipes and snuff
jars, their handbags, powder boxes and handkerchiefs. I have felt their
old pocket watches, their knives, dishes, tools, jewelry, combs and
brushes. I have tried my best to take in what is left of their presence
and there is one thing that makes me cry with joy that I can hold it in
my hand and smell the sweet smell of the years everytime I open or
caress it, it smells of leather and ink and age, but it's never dusty or
used up....it's always there with warmth and peace and love....it's
their Family Bible. The one piece of their lives that reaches generation
after generation and is more loved each time it's given to the next,
it's the one part of them that they couldn't live without, they couldn't
read it, most of them, but it was there and they knew what it was
saying, they had learned that through the years from their parents and
their parents before them. Aren't ancestors marvelous. They make us
who we are; a mixture of proof that they had made their mark on the land
and it can never be erased. Thanksgiving, yes I give
thanks.....everyday.

Written at Smithville, OK., July 1996 where my Dad was born.
Lou Ann Phillips Lunsford

Ike & Nancy
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Proclamation - A National Thanksgiving
http://www.ewtn.com/proclamation.htm
Friends - Reading this from our dear first President, I can only guess what he would say if he were allowed to return to our country for one day. It is a blessing, however, to see his words.

Judy *************************************************************************************
From: Livasy4
Hi, 
Thanks for the great work. Wouldn't it be great if there was a portion of the newsletter dedicated to finding heirs to CW papers and photographs? If such a site already exists, would you post the address? Thanks! Donna

{{{Donna}}} I think that’s a great idea, but I am unaware of any such site. However we’ll put this on the “Wire”. LOL If any know of such sites, email us the address and we’ll put it in the “Fireside”......
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From: Lkiwki
Thank you for the email...love getting the updates, but unsure of timing for actually getting into the chats.

When my sister and I tried finding our ggg grandfather we had nothing to be found on him after 1862. I suggested to her that we start checking into civil war activity for him. We did find him, in the 105th Infantry, Company K from Illinois. He joined 9/8/1862 in Dekalb - marched with the Army of The Cumberland until his death 6/5/1864. He was a teamster the entire time. His death was due to a fallen tree. He and a couple of comrades had one fall on them while eating lunch in the Acworth, Marietta area of Ga. He is buried in New Hope Battlefield. My next project is getting a picture of his gravesite. This will be hard as I live in Illinois and do not travel in that direction often.

Since researching my ggg grandfather, Edwin Nichols, I have been drawn into studying the civil war more. Very interesting and sad topic.
Thanks for the re-invite.
Lynne

{{Lynne}} Thanks for dropping us a note :-) To answer the “timing for the chats” question. We meet every THURSDAY NIGHT in the Golden Gates Chat Room of the Genealogy Forum (keyword = roots) at 9pm eastern time. As to the other, this might be a really neat time to start a “HELP A RESEARCHER” area. I’ll put this to the membership and see what happens. WHAT WOULD ALL OF YOU WHO READ THE “FIRESIDE” THINK ABOUT GOING OUT AND TAKING A FEW PICTURES OF AREAS CLOSE (VERY CLOSE) TO YOUR HOMES FOR OTHER MEMBERS THAT ARE TOO FAR AWAY OR UNABLE TO GET TO THESE SITES. I’m thinking that I would NOT publish any addresses of members (to respect your privacy) but just list the REQUEST in the Newsletter and let the membership respond to the requestors through individual email...... That way no undue burden would be put on any individual member. Anyway it’s a thought, so let me know your thinking. OH, and if anyone could help Lynne out, fire her an email :-) The New Hope Battlefield is just off (North ?) of US Hwy 278 about 25 miles northwest of Atlanta, Georgia. Towns close or fairly close are Dallas, New Hope, Kennesaw, Braswell, Marietta.
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From: Rexchase

Frazier's "Cold Mountain" novel is a little hard to get into - in fact I put it aside several times before forcing myself to finish it.
I would highly recommend another book over Cold Mountain. That is "On The Occasion Of My Last Afternoon" by Kay Gibbons published this year (1998). It is probably one of the finest novels I have ever read about the Civil War or any other event. It is well written, moves rapidly and draws the reader into the situations. Had a hard time placing it aside to eat or sleep. Go for it!!!!!!!!
Rex

Rex - thanks for the tip on the new book. I haven’t tried that one yet. I’m Going For It!!!! Heh Heh
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From: B Buck 61
Jim
I have intended to come into your chat room but either forget or have fallen asleep ( get up at 4 am usually). As you (VERY politely) put it...the C.W. room I first visited was not condusive to intellegent conversation. TUBES (fine gentleman - also our own GFH TEG) invited me to your room and I hope to get there before long. I got interested in the C.W. because my grandfather served (for the Union) 4 years as a wagoneer..he drove the same team of mules the entire war which I understand was quite rare. I thought understanding the mentality of those times would help me in my genealogy...but the things they did in that war defies understanding. That kind of mentality is beyond my ability to comprehend. So ...perhaps by listening to you folks I can get some kind of grasp of thier reasoning. Hope to see you there..........Dick

Dick - thanks for dropping us a line. We appreciate your remarks and it just gives us more incentive to keep our Focus as we have it. Hope to see you soon. :-)
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From: AvalonPark
Thankyou, thankyou, for the wonderful tribute you paid to all the service men that 
served our great country and are now serving. Being the wife of one of those World War 2 service men that is now gone, I fully appreciate the great tribute you gave to those men.

AvalonPark :D It was our pleasure and the resources of our membership that provided them :D
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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT…………. 

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of. 

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate 
one Thursday a month to the sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; 
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, 
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on 
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly 
Fireside." 

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from 
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- 
haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events****** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFS Jayne, GFH TEG and GFS Jim and our many fill-in friends :) 

12/3/98 - "The Story of a Campaign” by Mark Twain - GFS Jim

12/10/98 - "Letters, Songs and Poems Night"

12/17/98 - "OPEN CHAT"

12/24/98 - "MERRY CHRISTMAS" To allow all of you to enjoy your Christmas time with Family, Your 
HOST's are taking Christmas Eve OFF. And we're gonna be funnin around with our Families as well. 

12/31/98 - "HAPPY NEW YEAR'S EVE" I'm not sure what we'll do that night. We're a thinkin.... LOL

We'll See You Thursday Night……….! 
Your Hosts 
GFS Jayne, GFH TEG and GFS Jim

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