March 2002 Weekly Firesides

Hear Ye .... Hear Ye
"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 03 March 2002

Our Mission: To serve all genealogists by providing an enjoyable online environment with as many helpful and reliable resources as possible.

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Boy is it good to be home again :D. My sojourn in Florida was great but there's no place like home. Especially if you're working the whole time you're gone. Last Thursday we told the first part of William Barker Cushing and the North Carolina Sounds. We just had a grand time and if you couldn't make it, well, we missed you! Part II is scheduled for 3/28/02, so don't miss it.

This coming Thursday will be OPEN CHAT in the Golden Gates room. We'll keep a light on for ya!

Regimental History Website collection:

Well we've continued to receive inputs on our request for sites. Good show gang! Now that I'm back, we'll start figuring a way to collect them together and get the word out to you. Continue to wish us well on this little project :D

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Civil War History & Genealogy Forum Related Activities and Sites
Available for your Enjoyment and Research


War Between the States (Tracing your Civil War Ancestors)
With HOST GFS Amy and HOST GFS Wolford on
Friday evenings at 9:00 PM EDT in the Golden Gates Chat Room
of the Genealogy Forum (ONLY ON AOL) at KEYWORD: ROOTS


"Genealogy Forum's Military Resources" Website
devoted to Civil War History and the material presented in
the American Civil War History Special Interest Group
in the Genealogy Forum of America On-Line.
The address is:
http://www.genealogyforum.rootsweb.com/gfaol/resource/Military/

The Weekly Fireside Archives
http://www.genealogyforum.rootsweb.com/gfaol/resource/Military/Fireside.htm


The Genealogy Forum Mailing List Signup
You may subscribe by sending an email to:
GOLDEN-GATE-L-request@rootsweb.com
Title the subject of the email SUBSCRIPTION and type "Subscribe"
in the body of the email message.

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Editor's Note: I sincerely encourage you to feel entirely free to post any Civil War Letters, Stories or articles that you have in our Civil War History Files through the new Military Resources Website. We are trying "beef up" our Library and now those of you who have patiently stuck with us who aren't AOL Members can now participate. There is also an area for you to upload photos, if you would desire to share those with the Civil War History community. On the Web Site, there are links to our Civil War Library (Files, Firesides, and Photo's).

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FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WE REALLY WELCOME YOU TO OUR MERRY BAND" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU, TRADING QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS AND ESPECIALLY YOUR CAMARADERIE!!! :-)... COME AGAIN OFTEN, WE DO INDEED "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY..

Every first-timer to the American Civil War History SIG gets put on the newsletter distribution automatically, because we like to send you a "Thank You Card" for coming to visit and this is our way of doing so. We hope to give you an opportunity to jump right in with us. If you desire NOT to receive the newsletter, then just drop us an email saying UNSUBSCRIBE and we will quickly remove your screen name from distribution. We certainly don't want to clog your mailbox with unwanted material. Also many of you pass on the newsletter to others that don't subscribe to AOL. We really want to thank you for spreading the word. I would also like to let you know that we would be happy to add them to our list if they have email of any sort. We distribute everywhere to those that have requested it. AOL membership is not a requirement although we'd love to see you in the Chat Room :D

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Did you know...............

From: MM3C11259@aol.com

Sickles had a career (less than illustrious) as a politician, Civil War General and US Ambassador- here are some of his deeds:

  1. Shot and killed Phillip Barton Keys, his wife's lover and son of the author of the national anthem. Sickles was charged with murder, but with the help of his Attorney Edwin M. Stanton (later in Lincoln's cabinet) was acquitted after the 1st successful plea of temporary insanity in American Jurisprudence.
  2. Political General in Civil War Union army - Almost lost the Battle of Gettysburg for the Union by advancing his troops (Excelsior Brigade) to the peach orchard against direct orders on July 2. Lost a leg in that battle and donated it to the Army Medical Museum where he frequently visited it in later years. For his Civil War service, awarded the Medal of Honor in 1897.
  3. As Ambassador to Spain, embarked on an affair with the Spanish Queen that led to his recall.


Also From: MM3C11259@aol.com
(not exactly Civil War related but of the same basic time period and very interesting indeed)

I previously told you about the original postage stamps issued by the U.S. in 1847. All stamps issued up until 1857 were issued in unperforated sheets because perforations had not yet been invented. Post office employees had use a scissors to cut out any stamps you wanted from the sheet. Further, cancellation of stamps was done by hand with pen and ink, or by whittled bottle corks with individualized designs( shamrocks, crosses, etc) in various colors until 1860, when the larger post offices got machine cancellation machines. By 1865, even the smallest post offices had been issued machine cancellation machines and individualized P.O. employee cancellations had been phased out.

............. and there you have it!

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THE HELP DESK

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: The new Military Resouces Website (Website is listed above in the Fireside) has a myriad of options for you. Here are some the choices: US Military Records, Conscription/Draft Records, Civil War Battle Names, Secession of the Confederate States, Your Civil War Ancestors - Where to Begin, Military Resources on the Internet, links to the Stories, Files and Talks of the American Civil War History Chat on AOL, message boards and many, many others. Your comments and suggestions are always welcome.

Additional Note from the Webmaster: Although we are thrilled to provide this area for you now, we want you to know that we are still building it and MORE files, Regimental Histories, etc., will be available in the near future. Stay Tuned!

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Weekly Web Sites We've Received

From: HOSTGFSHeather@aol.com

The Georgia Civil War Roster index http://www.rootsweb.com/~gagenweb/military/gsi/index.html
Here is a huge database of Confederate Soildiers who fought during the Civil WAR in GA. It is an index. From there folks can order their Military files through the National Archives. The work is still in progress but they have tons already listed. GREAT website!!!!!!!

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From: MM3C11259@aol.com

Confederados of Honduras (includes Family names of those emigrating to Honduras after the Civil War)
http://personal.msy.bellsouth.net/msy/c/s/csmcerjr/

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From: BitsOBlueNGray@aol.com

Battle of Perryville
http://www.battleofperryville.com
This site chronicles the American Civil War Battle of Perryville, Kentucky, fought October 8, 1862.

The Cincinnati Civil War Round Table
http://www.cincinnaticwrt.org/
The Cincinnati Civil War Round Table is a group of amateur historians from Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky dedicated to the study of the American Civil War.

History of the Pennsylvania Volunteers 1861-1865 by S.P. Bates
http://www.pa-roots.com/~pacw/bates.html


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MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!..

Here's how it works... If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will post it here... Other members see your request, some being in the near vicinity, are willing to assist, and can email you directly (This protects your privacy) to work out the details. We HIGHLY recommend the "Requester" pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" assistance between members (with the exception of defraying film and postage costs). Do unto others as.... you know
:-) Keep us posted on how this is working, so we can share them in the "Fireside"!!
HOST GFS Jim

IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED ANSWER(S) TO YOUR QUESTIONS, PLEASE BE SURE TO LET US KNOW!!!!!
Thanks!! - The Editors

We have had some gracious members offer their assistance in this area. Their screen names and areas they have offered to help in are listed.... Please honor their "goodness" and don't abuse them :-)....
We ask that you do follow the guidelines indicated above....

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Passed to us From: SusiCP@aol.com
From: nestor@usaor.net (Jeff & Gina Nestor)
Hi all,
I need some help deciphering what a rank abbreviation would mean for a Civil War soldier. I found a page that lists acronyms and abbreviations for the Civil War and it is very helpful but it didn't help me with this one. For anyone who is interested, the page is:
http://www.antiqueresources.com/articles/cwacronyms.html
Does anyone know what this abbreviation for rank would mean? The abbreviation is "Rec". I thought it might mean "recruit" but recruit is not a rank.
Thanks,
Gina Nestor

{{{Susi}}} - We'll see what we can find out. That's a new acronym for me....

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From: Probe101s@aol.com
I have a history of the 148th Volunteer Regiment of Pennsylvania. This lists all companies with pages of pictures of the leaders of each company. It is a two inch thick volumn with numerous letters from participants of each company. It was compiled at the beginning of the 1900's by members who did not want to lose the history of the conflict from their prospective.
Very good and I would be glad to research and share any information about this regiment.
Dave

"Dave" We're going to leave you generous offer in for another week.

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From: RAdams505@aol.com
You were very nice a couple of years ago when I was looking for Union Vet burial site. Now, I wonder if you can tell me where I can find a roster of those killed while serving in the 14th Alabama Cavalry. I have seen the complete Confederate Roster, but have not been able to find the specific AL Regiment. Have looked all over Ancestry and all other online sites I can think of, Alabama Archives Etc. I will look in on the next CW chat.
Thanks
RAdams

RAdams - thanks for the nice note. I'm going to recommend Broadfoot Publishing's "The Roster of Confederate Soldiers 1861-1865", edited by Janet B. Hewett for starters. I'll double check in my local Library but I'm pretty sure those books give the regiments they served in. Now for your specific question about those in the 14th Alabama Cav that were killed, I'll ask the membership for their advice. We'll see what turns up.

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OUR WEEKLY READING
(These items are extracts from our Letters, Songs, and Poems evenings)


John Burns of Gettysburg
By Bret Harte (1836-1902)

John Burns was a 72-year old
cobbler in Gettysburg when the battle came.
He picked up his rifle, joined the 150th
Pennsylvania Infantry, and blasted away at the
Confederates. He was wounded in action,
returned to his home when Lee had retreated,
and then was lionized by the Union press all
over the country.

Have you heard the story that gossips tell
Of Burns of Gettysburg? No? Ah, well:
Brief is the glory that hero earns,
Briefer the story of poor John Burns.
He was the fellow who won renown,
The only man who didn't back down
When the rebels rode through his native town;
But held his own in the fight next day,
When all his townfolk ran away.
That was in July, sixty-three,
The very day that General Lee,
Flower of Southern chivalry,
Baffled and beaten, backward reeled
From a stubborn Meade and a barren field.

I might tell now, but the day before,
John Burns stood at his cottage door,
Looking down the village street,
Where, in the shade of his peaceful vine,
He heard the low of his gathered kine,
And felt their breath with incense sweet;
Or I might say, when the sunset burned
The old farm gable, he thought it turned
The milk that fell like a babbling flood
Into the milk-pail, red as blood;
Or how he fancied the hum of bees
Were bullets buzzing among the trees.
But all such fanciful thoughts as these
Were strange to a practical man like Burns,
Who minded only his own concerns,
Troubled no more by fancies fine
Than one of his calm-eyed, long-tailed kine,
Quite old-fashioned and matter-of-fact,
Slow to argue, but quick to act.
That was the reason, as some folk say,
He fought so well on that terrible day.

And it was terrible. On the right
Raged for hours the heady fight,
Thundered the battery's double bass,
Difficult music for men to face;
While on the left, -- where now the graves
Undulate like the living waves
That all the day unceasing swept
Up to the pits the rebels kept, --
Round-shot ploughed the upland glades,
Sown with bullets, reaped with blades;
Shattered fences here and there,
Tossed their splinters in the air;
The very trees were stripped and bare;
The barns that once held yellow grain
Were heaped with harvests of the slain;
The cattle bellowed on the plain,
The turkeys screamed with might and main,
And brooding barn-fowl left their rest
With strange shells bursting in each nest.

Just where the tide of battle turns,
Erect and lonely, stood old John Burns.
How do you think the man was dressed?
He wore an ancient, long buff vest,
Yellow as saffron, -- but his best;
And buttoned over his manly breast
Was a bright blue coat with a rolling collar,
And large gilt buttons, --size of a dollar,--
With tails that the country-folk called
"swaller."
He wore a broad-brimmed, bell-crowned hat,
White as the locks on which it sat.
Never had such a sight been seen
For forty years on the village green,
Since old John Burns was a country beau,
And went to the "quiltings" long ago.

Close at his elbows all that day,
Veterans of the Peninsula,
Sunburnt and bearded, charged away;
And striplings, downy of lip and chin,--
Clerks that the Home Guard mustered in,--
Glanced, as they passed, at the hat he wore,
Then at the rifle his right hand bore;
And hailed him, from out their youthful lore,
With scraps of langy repertoire:
"How are you, White Hat?" "Put her
through!"
"Your head's level!" and "Bully for you!"
Called him "Daddy," –begged he'd disclose
The name of the tailor who made his clothes,
And what was the value he set on those;
While Burns unmindful of jeer and scoff,
Stood there picking the rebels off,--
With his long brown rifle, and bell-crowned hat,
And the swallow-tails they were laughing at.

'Twas but a moment, for that respect
Which clothes all courage their voices
checked;
And something the wildest could understand
Spake in the old man's strong right hand,
And his corded throat, and the lurking frown
Of his eyebrows under his old bell-crown;
Until, as they gazed, there crept an awe
Through the ranks in whispers, and some men
saw,
In the antique vestments and long white hair,
The Past of the Nation in battle there;
And some of the soldiers since declare
That the gleam of his old white hat afar,
Like the crested plume of the brave Navarre,
That day was their oriflamme of war.
Thus raged the battle. You know the rest;
How the rebels, beaten, and backward pressed,
Broke at the final charge and ran.
At which John Burns, --a practical man,--
Shouldered his rifle, unbent his brows,
And then went back to his bees and cows.

That is the story of old John Burns;
This is the moral the reader learns:
In fighting the battle, the question's whether
You'll show a hat that's white, or a feather

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY...

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedback's, Items of Interest and Plea's for HELP...

From: AndersonvilleCW@aol.com
I know its short notice, but could this be included in the next newsletter???

ANDERSONVILLE REVISITED
The History of Andersonville

This unique living history program offers visitors the opportunity to see and experience what life was like at the infamous Civil War prison camp. Living history and reenactors will portray Andersonville prisoners and guards.

Saturday March 11, 2002 

10:00 A.M. Prisoner arrival and Shebang building

10:30 A.M. Guard Drill and Demonstration

11.00 A.M. Artillery Talk (Earthwork-North End of Prison)

12:00 Noon Issuing of Rations

1:00 P.M. Arrival of Fresh Fish

2:00 P.M. Artillery Talk (Earthwork North End of Prison)

2:30 P.M. Guard Inspection of Prison

3:00 P.M. Escape and Punishment

3:30 P.M. Guard Drill and Demonstration

4:00 P.M. Raider Attack

5:00 P.M. Park Gates Close

6:30 P.M. Park Gates Reopen for Candle Lantern Tours

7:00 P.M. Candle Lantern Tours Begin

See Bottom of Page for Tour Details

Sunday March 10, 2002

10:00A.M. SheBang Building

10:30 Guard Drill and demonstration

11:00 A.M. Artillery Talk (Earthwork-North End of Prison)

11:30 A.M. Guard Inspection of Prison

12:00 Noon Arrival of Fresh Fish

1:30 P.M. Guard Inspection of Prison

2:00 P.M. Artillery Talk (Earthworh-NorthEnd of Prison)

2:30 P.M. Guard Drill ond Demonstration

3:00 P.M. Escape and Punishment

5:00 P.M. Park Closes

INFORMATION REGARDING CANDLE LANTERN TOURS SATURDAY MARCH 9, 2002

* Tours begin every 20 minutes and last approximately 45 minutes

* Reservations are required for the Lantern Tours. Reservations can be made beginning February 1, 2002, by calling 229-924-0343, extension 201.

* Please do not be late for your scheduled tour time.

* Dress for the weather and wear sturdy shoes.

* A flashlight would be helpful for use from the parking area to the beginning point of the tour. Flashlights will NOT be used during the tour.

* Lantern Tours may not be approporate for pre-school age children.

* The main park entrance will be open at 6:30 P.M. for the Lantern Tours. Follow signs for parking.

Andersonville National Historic Site is located 10 miles North-East of Americus, Georgia, on Highway 49. All demonstrations and scenarios will be presented in the NorthEast corner of the Historic Prison site unless otherwise noted. Times of Demonstrations and scenarios are subject to change. For more information, Please call 229-924-0343 or email me at Frye@gnat.net.
Kevin Frye

Local Andersonville Historian / National Park Service Volunteer
Thanks....
Kevin

Please visit my website dedicated to those Americans who were imprisoned and died in captivity while in the service to our country
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html
AOL USERS go to http://hometown.aol.com/andersonvillecw/

{{Kevin}} - thanks for letting us know!!!!

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From MM3C11259@aol.com
The following appeared in the NY Mercury, a daily newspaper, on Aug 4, 1861
NEGRO SOLDIERS FOR THE REBELS
The Legislature of Tennessee has passed an act "for the relief of volunteers" which authorizes the governor to impress into the army all the free negroes of that state between the ages of 15 and 50 years, being sound of mind and body. These " volunteers" are to perform such menial services in the camp as may be required, and receive therefor regular rations, with eight dollars per month as wages.

{{{MM3}}} Thankee :D

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From NOSHOWCLC@aol.com
My question:
Does anyone have any information about a Civil War reunion that might include both Union and Confederate soldiers camping side-by-side? I have a photograph of my great-grandfather at what must have been some sort of reunion. He's out in front of his tent doing his laundry in a washbowl and there are both flags hanging in front of the tents. Just wondering if there were many reunions like this and where they might have taken place. He fought for the 9th NY Cavalry.
Susan
NOSHOWCLC@aol.com

Susan found her own answer to the questions above...

From NOSHOWCLC@aol.com
Jayne and all that replied to my Civil War reunion photograph,

Thank you all for your input! I have identified this photograph as the Battle of Gettysburg 50th Anniversary Reunion in 1, 2, 3, and 4 July 1913. An unusual reunion where old enemies came together in "brotherly love and affection." This photo is part of a massive tent city housing the approximate 60,000 veterans that were in attendance, bivouacked on the old battlefield, retraced steps, looked up old comrades and swapped stories.

Included in the formal ceremonies was a speech by President Woodrow Wilson. He was heard as saying, "We have found one another again as brothers and comrades in arms, enemies no longer, generous friends rather, our battles long past, the quarrel forgotten, except that we shall not forget the splendid valor, the manly devotion of the men arranged against one another, now grasping hands and smiling into each other's eyes."

An interesting note - each state who had soldiers at the Battle of Gettysburg were represented with not surprisingly, the largest being PA with 21,800 veterans, the smallest being NM with 1 veteran. Train fare within PA was free to all the veterans. The numbers far exceeded the attendance estimates and the U.S. Army scrambled to feed them all.

A final note from HOST GFS Jim - Susan there was an incredible writeup in either "Civil War Times Illustrated" or "America's Civil War" monthly magazines about this 1913 reunion. If I'm remembering correctly, this reunion was the FIRST ever that all these veterans (North and South) had ever gathered together. There were some awesome happenings that took place there. It's worth a lookup. I'll bet James Kushlan, editor of the Civil War Times Illustrated could recall that one.

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From HOST GFS Chuck@aol.com

16 March 2002 - Civil War Workshop, Knoxville, TN
From eths@east-tennessee-history.org
Whether your ancestors wore blue or gray in the American Civil War, the East Tennessee Historical Society is offering a free workshop to help find your family's Civil War story. The free class will be held 2 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, 16 March 2002 at the East Tennessee History Center in downtown Knoxville, at 600 Market St. The instructor, Dr. George K. Schweitzer, is a popular, nationally-known lecturer and author of nineteen genealogy research books.

Participants will learn how to determine if an ancestor served in the Civil War and how to locate records for both Confederate and Union veterans. Although the research will focus on Tennessee, much of the information will apply to participants with ancestors in other states as well. The ETHS Civil War genealogy classes are being held in conjunction with the historical society's new heritage program, "Civil War Families of Tennessee."

The East Tennessee Historical Society, founded in 1834, is one of the oldest cultural institutions in the state of Tennessee. ETHS, a non-profit organization headquartered in Knoxville, is dedicated to preserving, interpreting, and promoting the history of the region. The society's activities and exhibits are made possible through the support of its membership. For additional information about the genealogy workshops, membership, or other ETHS programs, call 865-215-8824, or visit the historical society's web site at http://www.east-tennessee-history.org.

{{{Chuck}}} Thanks for the schedule ole pard :D

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War", with byproducts of laughter, and comraderie!

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly Fireside."

AND Hey! TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :)

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We really "fire up" with what members bring to the discussions, and we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif," just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "post-haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events*****

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Chat Room (On AOL Only) with hosts HOST GFS Amy, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Jim and our many faithful friends :)

3/7/02 - OPEN CHAT

3/14/02 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night.

3/21/02 - OPEN CHAT

3/28/02 - William Barker Cushing and the North Carolina Sound - Part 2 by HOST GFS Jim

4/4/02 - OPEN CHAT

4-11-02 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night.

4/18/02 - OPEN CHAT

We'll See You Thursday Night..!
Your Joyful, Intelligent and Fun-lovin' Host's & Hostess's :-)
HOST GFS Jim, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Amy

Hear Ye .... Hear Ye
"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 10 March 2002

Our Mission: To serve all genealogists by providing an enjoyable online environment with as many helpful and reliable resources as possible.

==============================================

Well Thursday was scheduled for OPEN CHAT and it started off that way but quickly reverted into a rousing Ghost Story night. Much fun had by all. Now I wish you to take notice of some schedule changes for April.... We are greatly blessed by having the James Dunwoody Bulloch Story told on 4 April, that was submitted for our pleasure by MM3C11259@aol.com (Ted Fisher), from our own membership. Thanks Ted!!

And we will have a special guest coming to visit to tell us of the Exploits of John Frederick Hartranft on April 18. More to come.........

Note these in your calendar.....

I had a bit of difficulty last week on my "puter" and as a result of getting restored, upgraded, painted and trimmed, I've lost a few of your inputs to the "Fireside". I was able to save and archive most but did lose some. If you don't see some of your inputs, please, please send them back in.

This coming Thursday will be Letters, Songs and Poems of the Civil War. And man do we have a bunch to share this Thursday :D We'll be watching for you.

Regimental History Website collection:

Well we've continued to receive inputs on our request for sites. Good show gang! Now that I'm back, we'll start figuring a way to collect them together and get the word out to you. Continue to wish us well on this little project :D

==============================================

Civil War History & Genealogy Forum Related Activities and Sites
Available for your Enjoyment and Research

* * * * * 

War Between the States (Tracing your Civil War Ancestors)
With HOST GFS Amy and HOST GFS Wolford on
Friday evenings at 9:00 PM EDT in the Golden Gates Chat Room
of the Genealogy Forum (ONLY ON AOL) at KEYWORD: ROOTS

* * * * * 

"Genealogy Forum's Military Resources" Website
devoted to Civil War History and the material presented in
the American Civil War History Special Interest Group
in the Genealogy Forum of America On-Line.
The address is:
http://www.genealogyforum.rootsweb.com/gfaol/resource/Military/

The Weekly Fireside Archives
http://www.genealogyforum.rootsweb.com/gfaol/resource/Military/Fireside.htm

* * * * * 

The Genealogy Forum Mailing List Signup
You may subscribe by sending an email to:
GOLDEN-GATE-L-request@rootsweb.com
Title the subject of the email SUBSCRIPTION and type "Subscribe"
in the body of the email message.

==============================================

Editor's Note: I sincerely encourage you to feel entirely free to post any Civil War Letters, Stories or articles that you have in our Civil War History Files through the new Military Resources Website. We are trying "beef up" our Library and now those of you who have patiently stuck with us who aren't AOL Members can now participate. There is also an area for you to upload photos, if you would desire to share those with the Civil War History community. On the Web Site, there are links to our Civil War Library (Files, Firesides, and Photo's).

==============================================

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WE REALLY WELCOME YOU TO OUR MERRY BAND" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU, TRADING QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS AND ESPECIALLY YOUR CAMARADERIE!!! :-)... COME AGAIN OFTEN, WE DO INDEED "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY..

Every first-timer to the American Civil War History SIG gets put on the newsletter distribution automatically, because we like to send you a "Thank You Card" for coming to visit and this is our way of doing so. We hope to give you an opportunity to jump right in with us. If you desire NOT to receive the newsletter, then just drop us an email saying UNSUBSCRIBE and we will quickly remove your screen name from distribution. We certainly don't want to clog your mailbox with unwanted material. Also many of you pass on the newsletter to others that don't subscribe to AOL. We really want to thank you for spreading the word. I would also like to let you know that we would be happy to add them to our list if they have email of any sort. We distribute everywhere to those that have requested it. AOL membership is not a requirement although we'd love to see you in the Chat Room :D

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A Family Story (no Civil War but pertinent)...............
Oct. 8, 1942 McDonald Record-Outlook

Six Sons In Army; Dad Works Hard On Farm
Irving Bourman in Pittsburgh Post-Gazette


Joe KOVACH put a little more elbow grease on the old stone grinding wheel as sweat oozed from the worn wrinkles on his face. "Gotta work little harder now," Joe said. "Got six boys in the army and today Joe-he's my boy too; he go for physical examination. He makes seven, I guess." You'd imagine right off that having seven of eleven boys in the army might take the starch out of a 69-year-old guy. But not Joe KOVACH. After putting in a good day at the coal mines, Joe comes home to tend his 19-acre farm on Jug hollow road, Imperial, with what little help he can get from his three sons who are yet too young for the armed services. The oldest is married with his own family.

It's a tough struggle, especially in Joe's case, where the past 10 years means a lot of headaches to feed his one-family football team. "Damn right gotta work hard to feed 'em," Joe admitted yesterday. "Gotta work like hell. Before war we no been working for a long time. Things were bad. The boys no work, either. Now there's plenty work-boys, they go to army.

Here Joe paused for a minute to pass his hand through the blond hair of Gilbert, the seven-year-old baby of the family. "He still here." Joe said, "So's Albert and Bill. But Bill, he maybe go soon, too. He's 17." Then Joe told why he is proud because six of his seven sons are in the army, scattered on all of the world's fighting fronts and a seventh to go soon.

"I come here from Hungary in 1908," Joe relates. "I still got brother, sisters over there. My missus-she's got brothers and sisters over there. We no hear from them for long time. Three years maybe. We don't know if they're dead or living." "If he come over here (referring to Hitler), maybe it's the same thing. That's why I'm proud to have my boys in army. We get this war quicker through."

Joe had a little trouble remembering in the names and ages of all of his sons in the army. "Got other things up here," he said as he pointed to his head with thick, Calloused fingers. Then Joe told how Andy 25, and Steve, 23, are together in England. Andy is a sergeant and Steve a corporal. Corporal Paul Kovach, 24, is in Alaska. Ben, 20, is in Fort Meade, George 22, is in Norfolk, Va., and Mike, 27, is in New Mexico. "That Mike," Joe laughed. "He's married. He was goin' with girl, goin', goin', goin'. I say "Mike you married?' He say, "No." Then one day I say "Mike, you married?" He say "Yes"-just like that. I don't think it's too smart for soldier boy to get married."

Having six sons in the army-especially so scattered-has Joe worried some times. "We get no letter from Paul in five months" Joe said. "Only last week we hear he's all right." "But that's okay," he mused. "If President Roosevelt have few more families like mine-he'd have lots soldiers."

That's no lie.

A related story a few weeks later, November 20, 1942.
Mother of Six in Army is Made US Citizen

Uncle Sam on Thursday of last week said "thanks" in a big way to the mother of six men in his armed forces, according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Mrs. Julia KOVACH of Imperial, who has six sons in the army and a seventh awaiting his second physical examination prior to induction, received the most valuable honor Uncle Sam can give. She was made a citizen of the United States.

And after simple ceremonies during which she took the oath of allegiance with 50 other persons in the United States naturalization office in Pittsburgh, Mrs. KOVACH proudly declared that it was "the happiest day of my life."

Because she was a native of belligerent Hungary, she became a citizen through special efforts of naturalization officers. But in the 32 years that she has been in this country she has been a model resident and is the mother of 11 children-all of them boys.

After her eldest son, Joe, Jr., enters the army in a few weeks, she'll have only Gilbert, 7, Albert 14, and Bill, 17, at home. A fourth is married and has a family of his own. Three of her six sons in the service are on overseas duty.

With so many sons in the service, her husband, Joe KOVACH, who was naturalized in 1928, has to work his 19-acre farm after putting in a good day at an Imperial coal mine. In fact, there's plenty of work for both of them, and Mrs. KOVACH said that she was preparing for still more. "Maybe more of my sons will be in the army," she said.

Thanks Susi for the article!

............. and there you have it!

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THE HELP DESK

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: The new Military Resouces Website (Website is listed above in the Fireside) has a myriad of options for you. Here are some the choices: US Military Records, Conscription/Draft Records, Civil War Battle Names, Secession of the Confederate States, Your Civil War Ancestors - Where to Begin, Military Resources on the Internet, links to the Stories, Files and Talks of the American Civil War History Chat on AOL, message boards and many, many others. Your comments and suggestions are always welcome.

Additional Note from the Webmaster: Although we are thrilled to provide this area for you now, we want you to know that we are still building it and MORE files, Regimental Histories, etc., will be available in the near future. Stay Tuned!

==============================================

Weekly Web Sites We've Received

From: HOSTGFSChuck@aol.com

CNN Article on "Saving Civil War Prisons
http://www.cnn.com/2002/TRAVEL/NEWS/02/28/florence.
stockade.ap/index.html

NOTE: Check on this quick as I believe the article expires from the website on 14 Mar 2002

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MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!..


Here's how it works... If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will post it here... Other members see your request, some being in the near vicinity, are willing to assist, and can email you directly (This protects your privacy) to work out the details. We HIGHLY recommend the "Requester" pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" assistance between members (with the exception of defraying film and postage costs). Do unto others as.... you know
:-) Keep us posted on how this is working, so we can share them in the "Fireside"!!
HOST GFS Jim

IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED ANSWER(S) TO YOUR QUESTIONS, PLEASE BE SURE TO LET US KNOW!!!!!
Thanks!! - The Editors

We have had some gracious members offer their assistance in this area. Their screen names and areas they have offered to help in are listed.... Please honor their "goodness" and don't abuse them :-)....
We ask that you do follow the guidelines indicated above....

* * * * *

Passed to us From: SusiCP@aol.com
From: nestor@usaor.net (Jeff & Gina Nestor)
Hi all,
I need some help deciphering what a rank abbreviation would mean for a Civil War soldier. I found a page that lists acronyms and abbreviations for the Civil War and it is very helpful but it didn't help me with this one. For anyone who is interested, the page is:
http://www.antiqueresources.com/articles/cwacronyms.html
Does anyone know what this abbreviation for rank would mean? The abbreviation is "Rec". I thought it might mean "recruit" but recruit is not a rank.
Thanks,
Gina Nestor

{{{Susi}}} - We'll see what we can find out. That's a new acronym for me....

* * * * * 

From: RAdams505@aol.com
You were very nice a couple of years ago when I was looking for Union Vet burial site. Now, I wonder if you can tell me where I can find a roster of those killed while serving in the 14th Alabama Cavalry. I have seen the complete Confederate Roster, but have not been able to find the specific AL Regiment. Have looked all over Ancestry and all other online sites I can think of, Alabama Archives Etc. I will look in on the next CW chat.
Thanks
RAdams

From: BJSGen@aol.com
Taken from http://www.askjeeves.com
The article starts off with advice to check Broadfoots books. Need to remember that there were some regiments that were Union as well as Confederate. Listed all the regular cavalry units. Did not have a 14th listed except this one:

14th Alabama Cavalry Battalion, Partisan Rangers
Consolidated with the 19th Alabama Cavalry Battalion on 15 April 1863; unit designated 7th (afterwards 9th) Alabama Cavalry.

Cavalry: || 1st Cavalry || 2nd Cavalry || 3rd Cavalry || 4th Cavalry (Roddy's) ||
|| 4th Cavalry (Russell's) || 4th (Love's) Battalion || 5th Cavalry || 5th Battalion, Hilliard's Legion ||
|| 6th Cavalry || 7th Cavalry || 8th Cavalry (Ball's) || 8th Cavalry (Livingston's) || 9th Cavalry ||
|| 10th Cavalry || 11th Cavalry || 12th Cavalry || 12th Battalion || 13th Battalion || 15th Battalion ||
|| 24th Battalion || 25th Battalion || 51st Cavalry || 53rd Cavalry || 56th Cavalry ||
|| Barbiere's Cavalry Battalion || Forrest's Cavalry || Lewis' (Harrell's) Cavalry Battalion ||
|| Mead's Cavalry Battalion || Moreland's Cavalry ||

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY...

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedback's, Items of Interest and Plea's for HELP...

From: UCMEGEEBEE@aol.com
Wasn't Thursday night special? I just loved all the impromptu stories. Seemed like everyone was telling one of their favorites. I still get goosebumps when I think of Tom's story. Usually I would just poo-poo someone with that kind of story, but his seems true to me and I give it (and him) the full respect such a happening deserves. He is very fortunate to be able to find and be in a place where his spirit finds such peace. Tom alluded to serious health problems. I know that he has been at "ground zero" a long time and am glad he is able to go home, if even for a few days. Maybe a lifting of the spirit will also bring some healing to him. I certainly wish him the best.
Thank you for this picture... I loved the "tour" that Tom gave and the stories everyone shared. You and the other hosts have created a special place and I know others must be as grateful to find it as I have been.
............. I came there hoping to become a little less ignorant about a portion of history that fascinates me - and found nice folks too! Wow a two-fer!! I may gush a bit, but it is because I am so absolutely blown away by all the things you all do to help others, educate, and SHARE. Thank you so much... over and over again
Hope you have a great week,
Glenda

{{{{Glenda}}}} You've made our day!! Annnnd made our Mission Statement "Glow" LOL

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From: UCMEGEEBEE@aol.com
Dear Jayne...

Of course you can tell Jim that I think the chat place is the neatest thing around. I came there hoping to become a little less ignorant about a portion of history that fascinates me - and found nice folks too! Wow a two-fer!! I may gush a bit, but it is because I am so absolutely blown away by all the things you all do to help others, educate, and SHARE. Thank you so much... over and over again, Glenda

* * * * * 

From Texzilla@aol.com
In last week's newsletter on the article "From MM3C11259@aol.com
The following appeared in the NY Mercury a daily newspaper on Aug 4, 1861 NEGRO SOLDIERS FOR THE REBELS The Legislature of Tennessee has passed an act "for the relief of volunteers" which authorizes the governor to impress into the army all the free negroes of that state between the ages of 15 and 50 years, being sound of mind and body. These " volunteers" are to perform such menial services in the camp as may be required, and receive therefor regular rations, with eight dollars per month as wages."

This was strictly forbidden until March, 1865 when the Confederate Congress allowed Negroes to be enlisted. The above were not soldiers, [but rather over-exuberant Media persons] trying to [imply that any] Negroes amongst Confederate soldiers were soldiers themselves. That LAST thing any Southerner wanted to see [during the Civil War] was a Negro with a gun.

{{{Tex}}} thanks for the update.

* * * * *

From NOSHOWCLC@aol.com
I've done a little research on the 50th Gettysburg Reunion (1913) , and found a few interesting facts on the event:
-The camp occupied 280 acres including 47 1/2 miles of city streets.
-It took 2,000 Army cooks and 173 field kitchens to feed the veterans with a total of 688,000 meals served.
-Boy Scouts served as escorts, aides, and messengers.
-It hit 100 degrees on July 2 - several hundred attendees were hospitalized due to heat exhaustion; 9,980 were treated for various illnesses, and 9 veterans died.
-Medical care was provided by the American Red Cross and the US Army Medical Corps.
-The youngest veteran in attendance was 61 years old; the oldest alleged to be 110 years old.

For more on this reunion, including all the scheduled events, try: http://www.gdg.org/1913.htm

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From BigGenealogyGirl@aol.com
If you are interested in or researching the Civil War, you may be interested in attending the following program, presented by the Fox Valley Genealogical Society at their general meeting next week:

DATE: 14 Mar 2002
TIME: 7:30 P.M.
PLACE: Naperville Municipal Center - Rooms B & C
400 S. Eagle St.
Naperville, IL
Speakers: David Nordin and David Corbett

Mr. Corbett is a popular and well-known interpreter of Civil War history. He is an officer and past president of the South Suburban Civil War Roundtable. He is also the Captain and commander of the 36th Illinois Infantry Regiment, a recreated Union Civil War military unit, and has participated in the large-scale anniversary re-enactments of the Civil War battles of Gettysburg, Chickamauga, Franklin and Vicksburg. In addition, he is an accomplished performer in many styles of traditional American music.
Mr. Nordin, is a member of Alexander Hamilton's New York Provincial Company of Artillery, and of the 36th Illinois Infantry Regiment Revolutionary War and Civil War re-enactment groups. Mr. Nordin has performed colonial fife and drum music at Carnegie Hall and participated in large-scale re-enactments of the 200th anniversary of the battle of Yorktown, VA and of the 225th anniversary of the battles at Lexington and Concord, MA. This is his second appearance before the Fox Valley Genealogical Society.
In addition to discussing the life of civil war soldiers, Messrs. Corbett and Nordin will perform songs of the Civil War and explain their origin. They will be in costume. This should be an exceptional program and we hope you will join us. Visitors are always welcome and there is no charge. We serve refreshments after the program! Hope to see you there.
Information about the society can be found at our web site at:
http://members.aol.com/fvgs1/calendar.html

{{BigGenealogyGirl}}} Thanks for the announcement!

* * * * * 

From: HOSTGFSChuck@aol.com

16 March 2002 - Civil War Workshop, Knoxville, TN
From eths@east-tennessee-history.org
Whether your ancestors wore blue or gray in the American Civil War, the East Tennessee Historical Society is offering a free workshop to help find your family's Civil War story. The free class will be held 2 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, 16 March 2002 at the East Tennessee History Center in downtown Knoxville, at 600 Market St. The instructor, Dr. George K. Schweitzer, is a popular, nationally-known lecturer and author of nineteen genealogy research books.

Participants will learn how to determine if an ancestor served in the Civil War and how to locate records for both Confederate and Union veterans. Although the research will focus on Tennessee, much of the information will apply to participants with ancestors in other states as well. The ETHS Civil War genealogy classes are being held in conjunction with the historical society's new heritage program, "Civil War Families of Tennessee."

The East Tennessee Historical Society, founded in 1834, is one of the oldest cultural institutions in the state of Tennessee. ETHS, a non-profit organization headquartered in Knoxville, is dedicated to preserving, interpreting, and promoting the history of the region. The society's activities and exhibits are made possible through the support of its membership. For additional information about the genealogy workshops, membership, or other ETHS programs, call 865-215-8824, or visit the historical society's web site at http://www.east-tennessee-history.org.

We'll leave this announcement up another week.

* * * * * 

From: JRose10700@aol.com

Got this off my Baton Rouge mail list. Sounds interesting.
joan

ATTENTION: CIVIL WAR BUFFS
AND THOSE WITH A TASTE FOR CIVIL WAR ACTIVITIES
IN THIS AREA

Area Civil War Participation to be Topic of March Meeting of the Washington Parish Genealogy and History Society

Reggie Simmons, Franklinton attorney and local student of the Civil War, will be the speaker for the next meeting of the Genealogy and History group. A sought-after speaker, Mr. Simmons has presented programs for various organizations on this topic.

Every year, he teaches Civil War and other history subjects for the Command and General Staff college. This schooling takes approximately 2 years and is taught in four phases for the military. The education/training is required before an officer can become a full colonel. Participants represent the Army and the Marines, including those in active duty and in the reserves or National Guard. This military training is the equivalent of a Master's program in a college. The four phases of training are taught alternately in various places in Louisiana and in Leavenworth, KS.

Mr. Simmons' presentation will include information on the Battle of Port Hudson plus other wartime activities in the area. He will bring with him some authentic Civil War weapons and reproduction uniforms and equipment.

The time of his Civil war Presentation is 5:30 at the Franklinton branch of the Washington Parish Library. The date is Tuesday, March 12, 2002.

The public is invited to participate in this meeting. It is being sponsored by the Washington Parish Genealogy and History Society.

{{Joan}} Thanks

* * * * *

From: MMeadPond@aol.com

Carolinas Campaign: Bentonville Battleground
Date: Saturday, March 16, 2002
Time: 10:00AM - 4:00PM EST (GMT-05:00)
Commemorate the 137th anniversary of the last major battle of the War for Southern Independence at the Bentonville Battleground in Four Oaks, NC.

Hours are 10AM to 4PM on Saturday, 16 March, and Sunday, 17 March. Events will include artillery and infantry demonstrations, lectures on civilian life, and demonstrations of Civil War medicine. Saturday night lantern tours (tickets required) of the Harper House return visitors to the gruesome three days of the battle, when beleaguered military surgeons struggled to care for the wounded. Night tours Saturday from 6:30 PM to 9:30 PM.

Bentonville Battleground is located at 5466 Harper House Road in Four Oaks. For further details or directions, please call (910) 594-0789, or e-mail bentonville@ncmail.net

{{{Mosey}}} Thanks Sis!

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War", with byproducts of laughter, and comraderie!

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly Fireside."

AND Hey! TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :)

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We really "fire up" with what members bring to the discussions, and we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif," just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "post-haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events*****

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Chat Room (On AOL Only) with hosts HOST GFS Amy, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Jim and our many faithful friends :)

3/14/02 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night.

3/21/02 - OPEN CHAT

3/28/02 - William Barker Cushing and the North Carolina Sound - Part 2 by HOST GFS Jim

4/4/02 - The James Dunwoody Bulloch Story by MM3C11259 (Ted Fisher).

4-11-02 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night.

4/18/02 - The Exploits of General John Frederick Hartranft as compiled by a Guest Speaker especially for the evening.

We'll See You Thursday Night..!
Your Joyful, Intelligent and Fun-lovin' Host's & Hostess's :-)
HOST GFS Jim, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Amy

Hear Ye .... Hear Ye
"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 17 March 2002

Our Mission: To serve all genealogists by providing an enjoyable online environment with as many helpful and reliable resources as possible.

==============================================

Thursday was just fabulous with all the new Letters, Songs and Poems we had to share. Many thanks "Ted" for your contributions. And we will have a special guest coming to visit to tell us of the Exploits of John Frederick Hartranft on April 18. More to come......... Note these in your calendar.....

This coming Thursday is OPEN CHAT in the Golden Gates. We'll be watching for you.

Regimental History Website collection:

Well we've continued to receive inputs on our request for sites. Good show gang! Now that I'm back, we'll start figuring a way to collect them together and get the word out to you. Continue to wish us well on this little project :D

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Civil War History & Genealogy Forum Related Activities and Sites
Available for your Enjoyment and Research

War Between the States (Tracing your Civil War Ancestors)
With HOST GFS Amy and HOST GFS Wolford on
Friday evenings at 9:00 PM EDT in the Golden Gates Chat Room
of the Genealogy Forum (ONLY ON AOL) at KEYWORD: ROOTS

* * * * *
"Genealogy Forum's Military Resources" Website
devoted to Civil War History and the material presented in
the American Civil War History Special Interest Group
in the Genealogy Forum of America On-Line.
The address is:
http://www.genealogyforum.rootsweb.com/gfaol/resource/Military/

The Weekly Fireside Archives
http://www.genealogyforum.rootsweb.com/gfaol/resource/Military/Fireside.htm

* * * * * 
The Genealogy Forum Mailing List Signup
You may subscribe by sending an email to:
GOLDEN-GATE-L-request@rootsweb.com
Title the subject of the email SUBSCRIPTION and type "Subscribe"
in the body of the email message.

==============================================

Editor's Note: I sincerely encourage you to feel entirely free to post any Civil War Letters, Stories or articles that you have in our Civil War History Files through the new Military Resources Website. We are trying "beef up" our Library and now those of you who have patiently stuck with us who aren't AOL Members can now participate. There is also an area for you to upload photos, if you would desire to share those with the Civil War History community. On the Web Site, there are links to our Civil War Library (Files, Firesides, and Photo's).

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FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WE REALLY WELCOME YOU TO OUR MERRY BAND" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU, TRADING QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS AND ESPECIALLY YOUR CAMARADERIE!!! :-)... COME AGAIN OFTEN, WE DO INDEED "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY..

Every first-timer to the American Civil War History SIG gets put on the newsletter distribution automatically, because we like to send you a "Thank You Card" for coming to visit and this is our way of doing so. We hope to give you an opportunity to jump right in with us. If you desire NOT to receive the newsletter, then just drop us an email saying UNSUBSCRIBE and we will quickly remove your screen name from distribution. We certainly don't want to clog your mailbox with unwanted material. Also many of you pass on the newsletter to others that don't subscribe to AOL. We really want to thank you for spreading the word. I would also like to let you know that we would be happy to add them to our list if they have email of any sort. We distribute everywhere to those that have requested it. AOL membership is not a requirement although we'd love to see you in the Chat Room :D

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Did you know...............
Well you all know how the boys tried the insanity dodge. Well, there was one young fellow in my regiment who played it most successfully. We were at Fort Grebel in February, 1862. Fort Grebel was on the branch of the Potomac, opposite Arlington Heights.

One night there was a very heavy rain, and in the morning, before the other soldiers began to stir about the camp, this fellow -- I have forgotten his name -- tied a string to his bayonet, took a position on the parapet, began fishing in a shallow pool, and to all appearances became entirely unmindful of his surroundings.

An hour passed. No one interrupted him, and still he could be seen quietly but regularly lifting his gun with the string from the pool, as though the gun were a fishing pole, and that he had a bite. By and by the sun came up, and while the other boys were going about camp preparing for breakfast, the fisherman still kept up his weary stroke, lifting his supposed fishing-tackle from the water almost as regularly as though it were done by a clock.

The surroundings and occasion were such that it was only necessary for a sane man to look once in order to be convinced that something was lacking about the "head-work" of the machine which was fishing in the pool.

The boys all began to talk about the matter, many of them jesting in a manner wholly amusing. But no cessation in the regular stroke of the fisherman. Finally the matter came to the notice of the captain, who at once proceeded to the interesting scene of operations.

"What are you doing here?" he demanded.

No response. The gun and string were lifted with the same regularity as ever.

"Halt!" commanded the captain.

Not a single movement of the fisherman. Up went the pretended fishing-tackle again.

"Shoulder arms!" again commanded the captain, thinking that hearing an accustomed order might bring the soldier to his senses.

But the warrior's countenance was as rigid as ever, and the fixed stare seemed riveted on the string which hung from the point of his bayonet and dropped carelessly down into the small poll before him.

The captain now concluded to report the matter to the colonel, and started off on the errand at once. He suddenly met the colonel who had also beheld the fisherman, and was coming to investigate. The captain then returned to the scene with the colonel, when the same experience was repeated.

The colonel concluded to call the surgeon, who came and examined the fisherman, -- as well as possible while the incessant raising and lowering of his gun was being carried on, -- and recommended that the insane fisherman be given a discharge, which was accordingly written out and handed to the captain; but before it was given to the soldier, the colonel asked: "What are you fishing for?"

No reply.

"Well, I guess you can give him the document," continued the colonel, and the captain handed it over to the fisherman, saying loudly: "Here! Take this!"

"That's what I was fishing for," replied the fisherman as he threw down his gun, picketed the discharge, and immediately left camp, much to the amazement of the colonel, the captain and the surgeon, and very much to the amusement of all others who had heard the conversation.

-- Colonel Thomas B. Van Buren

............. and there you have it!

==============================================

THE HELP DESK


This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: The new Military Resouces Website (Website is listed above in the Fireside) has a myriad of options for you. Here are some the choices: US Military Records, Conscription/Draft Records, Civil War Battle Names, Secession of the Confederate States, Your Civil War Ancestors - Where to Begin, Military Resources on the Internet, links to the Stories, Files and Talks of the American Civil War History Chat on AOL, message boards and many, many others. Your comments and suggestions are always welcome.

Additional Note from the Webmaster: Although we are thrilled to provide this area for you now, we want you to know that we are still building it and MORE files, Regimental Histories, etc., will be available in the near future. Stay Tuned!

==============================================

Weekly Web Sites We've Received


From: BitsOBlueNGray@aol.com

The Elmira Prison Camp OnLine Library
http://www.elmiraprisoncamp.com.

Other major additions include:

* * * * *

From: SusiCP@aol.com

46th Tennessee Website
http://www.geocities.com/drking40/Tenn.html

==============================================

MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!..

Here's how it works... If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will post it here... Other members see your request, some being in the near vicinity, are willing to assist, and can email you directly (This protects your privacy) to work out the details. We HIGHLY recommend the "Requester" pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" assistance between members (with the exception of defraying film and postage costs). Do unto others as.... you know
:-) Keep us posted on how this is working, so we can share them in the "Fireside"!!
HOST GFS Jim

IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED ANSWER(S) TO YOUR QUESTIONS, PLEASE BE SURE TO LET US KNOW!!!!!
Thanks!! - The Editors

We have had some gracious members offer their assistance in this area. Their screen names and areas they have offered to help in are listed.... Please honor their "goodness" and don't abuse them :-)....
We ask that you do follow the guidelines indicated above....

* * * * * 

Passed to us From: SusiCP@aol.com
From: nestor@usaor.net (Jeff & Gina Nestor)
Hi all,
I need some help deciphering what a rank abbreviation would mean for a Civil War soldier. I found a page that lists acronyms and abbreviations for the Civil War and it is very helpful but it didn't help me with this one. For anyone who is interested, the page is:
http://www.antiqueresources.com/articles/cwacronyms.html
Does anyone know what this abbreviation for rank would mean? The abbreviation is "Rec". I thought it might mean "recruit" but recruit is not a rank.
Thanks,
Gina Nestor

response From: Kashathree@aol.com

The Navy did have a rank of "Seaman Recruit." If this person was in the Navy, that is a possibility.

and another response From: IllinoisCW@aol.com

Although RECRUIT is not a rank --- it is a condition applied to soldiers that entered a regiment later then the mustering process and often had not been assigned to a specific company.

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OUR WEEKLY READING
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs, and Poems evenings)

We had so many good items Thursday night, that I have a long list to share over the coming weeks. However as I'm sure Mark Twain (Sam Clemens) must have said. "If something written or read is admired and applauded, then by all means, read it again!

How I Came to Write My Song
- Julia Ward Howe

I distinctly remember that a felling of discouragement came over me as I drew near the city of Washington. I thought of the women of my acquaintance whose sons or husbands were fighting our great battle, the women themselves serving in the hospitals, or busying themselves with the work of the Sanitary Commission. My husband was beyond the age of military service, and my eldest son but a stripling; my youngest was a child of not more than two years. I could not leave my nursery to follow the march of our armies; neither had I the practical deftness which the preparing and packing of sanitary stores demanded. Something seemed to say to me, "You give, and there is nothing for you to do." Yet, because of my sincere desire, a word was given me to say, which did strengthen the hearts of those who fought in the field and of those who languished in the prison.

We were invited one day to attend a review of troops at some distance from the town. While we were engaged in watching the maneuvers, a sudden movement of the enemy necessitated immediate action. The review was discontinued, and we saw a detachment of soldiers gallop to the assistance of a small body of our men who were in imminent danger of being surrounded and cut off from retreat. The regiments remaining on the field were ordered to march to their cantonments. We returned to the city very slowly, of necessity, for the troops nearly filled the road. My dear minister was in the carriage with me, as were several other friends. To beguile the rather tedious drive, we sang from time to time snatches of the army songs so popular at that time, concluding, I think with:
"John Brown's body lies a-mouldering in the ground;
His soul is marching on."

The soldiers seemed to like this and answered back, "Good for you!" Mr. Clark said, "Mrs. Howe, why do you not write some good words for that stirring tune?" I replied that I had often wished to do this but had not as yet found in my mind any leading toward it.

I went to bed that night as usual and slept, according to my wont, quite soundly. I awoke in the gray of the morning twilight, and as I lay waiting for the dawn, the long lines of the desired poem began to twine themselves in my mind. Having thought out all the stanzas, I said to myself, "I must get up and write these verses down, lest I fall asleep again and forget them." So with a sudden effort I sprang out of bed and found in the dimness an old stump of a pen which I remembered to have used the day before. I scrawled the verses almost without looking at the paper. I had learned to do this when, on previous occasions, attacks of versification had visited me in the night and I feared to have recourse to a light lest I wake the baby, who slept near me. I was always obliged to decipher my scrawl before another night should intervene, as it was only legible while the matter was fresh in my mind. At this time, having completed my writing, I returned to bed and fell asleep, saying to myself, "I like this better than most things that I have written."

The poem, which was soon after published in the "Atlantic Monthly" (Feb 1862), was somewhat praised on its appearance, but the vicissitudes of the war so engrossed public attention that small heed was taken of literary matters. I knew and was content to know that the poem soon found its way to the camps, as I heard from time to time of its being sung in chorus by the soldiers.

Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord;
He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored;
He hath loosed the fateful lightening of his terrible swift sword;
His truth is marching on.

I have seen Him in the watch fires of a hundred circling camps;
They have builded Him an alter in the evening dews and damps;
I can read His righteous sentence by the dim and flaring lamps.
His day is marching on.

I have read a fiery gospel writ in burnished rows of steel;
"As ye deal with my contemners, so with you my grace shall deal;
Let the Hero, born of woman, crush the serpent with his heel,
Since God is marching on."

He has sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat;
He is sifting out the hearts of men before his judgment seat;
Oh! be swift, my soul, to answer Him! be jubilant, my feet!
Our God is marching on.

In the beauty of the lilies Christ was born across the sea,
With a glory in His bosom that transfigures you and me;
As He died to make men holy, let us die to make men free,
While God is marching on.

Among the singers of the "Battle Hymn" was Chaplain McCabe, the fighting chaplain of the 122nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He read the poem in the "Atlantic," and was so struck with it that he committed it to memory before rising from his chair. He took it with him to the front, and in due time to Libby Prison, whither he was sent after being captured at Winchester. Here, in the great bare room where hundreds of Northern soldiers were herded together, came one night a rumor of disaster to the Union arms. A great battle, their jailers told them; a great Confederate victory. Sadly the Northern men gathered together in groups, sitting or lying on the floor, talking in low tones, wondering how, where, why. Suddenly one of the Negroes who brought food for the prisoners stooped in passing and whispered to one of the sorrowful groups. The news was false: there had, indeed, been a great battle, but the Union army had won, the Confederates were defeated and scattered.

Like a flame the word flashed through the prison. Men leaped to their feet, shouted, embraced one another in a frenzy of joy and triumph; and Chaplain McCabe, standing in the middle of the room, lifted up his great voice and sang aloud ----

"Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord!"

Every voice took up the chorus, and Libby Prison rang with the shout of "Glory, glory, hallelujah!"

The victory was that of Gettysburg. When, some time after, McCabe was released from prison, he told in Washington, before a great audience of loyal people, the story of his war-time experiences; and when he cam to that night in Libby Prison, he sang the "Battle Hymn" once more. The effect was magical; people shouted, wept, and sang, all together; and when the song was ended, above the tumult of applause was heard the voice of Abraham Lincoln, exclaiming, while the tears rolled down his cheeks, ------

"Sing it again!"

From the Editors: ....... but then again, if Sam Clemens didn't say that, he should have! Good Day! :-)

==============================================

A BIT OF COMMUNITY...

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedback's, Items of Interest and Plea's for HELP...

From: BitsOBlueNGray@aol.com
A Civil War Symposium is to be held in Steubenville, OH on Saturday, April 13, 2002. Sponsored by the Jefferson Co. Historical Association in conjunction with Jefferson Community College, it will concentrate on the role of, and events in, the Upper Ohio River Valley during the Civil War.

Scheduled to appear:
John Mattox, Local Historian- Underground Railroad
Don Markle, Author- "Spies and Spymasters of the Civil War"- David Homer Bates, Steubenville native and chief telegrapher for the Union- Telegraphic Espionage
Troy Harmon, Author and National Park Ranger- Gettysburg
Roger Pickenpaugh, Author- "Rescue by Rail"- Railroads in the Civil War
Gary Casteel, Author and Historic Sculptor- (Works include the new Longstreet Monument in Gettysburg)- Civil War Memorialization
Lyle Zurla, Historian- Morgan's Raid
Gerry Reilly, Historian- West Virginia Independence Hall, Wheeling, and WV Independence
Rhea Redd, Historian- The Children's Civil War- Day long demonstrations

There will be day long displays and demonstrations by collectors, re-enactors, and vendors, and additional historians and educators will be available for informal discussions. (Any genealogical or historical groups wishing to set up a display are invited to contact J. C. H. A.)
A teacher's workshop is planned for Fri. April 12.

All proceeds to benefit J. C. H. A. educational programs.
Donation: $20 in advance, $25 at door. Seniors and Students $15. Group rates available.

For more information or to register, contact:
Jeff Evans
Jefferson County Historical Association
P. O. Box 4268
Steubenville, OH, 43952
(740) 283-1133
e-mail: jchistory@hotmail.com

{{{{{Jayne}}}}} thanks for the notice

==============================================

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War", with byproducts of laughter, and comraderie!

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly Fireside."

AND Hey! TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :)

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We really "fire up" with what members bring to the discussions, and we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif," just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "post-haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events*****

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Chat Room (On AOL Only) with hosts HOST GFS Amy, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Jim and our many faithful friends :)

3/21/02 - OPEN CHAT

3/28/02 - William Barker Cushing and the North Carolina Sound - Part 2 by HOST GFS Jim

4/4/02 - The James Dunwoody Bulloch Story by MM3C11259 (Ted Fisher).

4-11-02 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night.

4/18/02 - The Exploits of General John Frederick Hartranft as compiled by Harry Sprohnie, who will be joining us as our guest for this special evening.

Editor's NOTE: I could also have misspelled Harry's last name, but I'll correct is as soon as I find out from Amy

4/25/02 - OPEN CHAT

5/02/02 - We have a special Guest - Don Gallagher who will be talking to us about "Reading the Civil War". This promises to be a great evening.... Don't miss this one.

Editor's NOTE: this date is tenative until we get confirmation from Don, so be watching.

We'll See You Thursday Night..!
Your Joyful, Intelligent and Fun-lovin' Host's & Hostess's :-)
HOST GFS Jim, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Amy

Hear Ye .... Hear Ye
"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 24 March 2002

Our Mission: To serve all genealogists by providing an enjoyable online environment with as many helpful and reliable resources as possible.

==============================================

Whhooooeeee did the room ever keep us hopping Thursday night. We had a great new group of "First Timers" and did we have a great time. Now as a reminder, we will have a special guest coming to visit to tell us of the Exploits of John Frederick Hartranft and another guest to lead us through Reading the Civil War. Check the schedule in the back for details......... Note these in your calendar.....

This coming Thursday William Barker Cushing and the North Carolina Sound - Part 2 . This will be the second and final part of this tale. Come on out and join us.

Civil War Roundtable Announcement from HOST GFS CHUCK

Jim, Jayne and Teg, you probably have this website on your lists. I've been getting announcements of their activities and thought I had better send it to you, just in case.

http://www.grpghcwrt.org/

Chuck

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Civil War History & Genealogy Forum Related Activities and Sites
Available for your Enjoyment and Research


War Between the States (Tracing your Civil War Ancestors)
With HOST GFS Amy and HOST GFS Wolford on
Friday evenings at 9:00 PM EDT in the Golden Gates Chat Room
of the Genealogy Forum (ONLY ON AOL) at KEYWORD: ROOTS

* * * * *

"Genealogy Forum's Military Resources" Website
devoted to Civil War History and the material presented in
the American Civil War History Special Interest Group
in the Genealogy Forum of America On-Line.
The address is:
http://www.genealogyforum.rootsweb.com/gfaol/resource/Military/

The Weekly Fireside Archives
http://www.genealogyforum.rootsweb.com/gfaol/resource/Military/Fireside.htm

* * * * *

The Genealogy Forum Mailing List Signup
You may subscribe by sending an email to:
GOLDEN-GATE-L-request@rootsweb.com
Title the subject of the email SUBSCRIPTION and type "Subscribe"
in the body of the email message.

==============================================

Editor's Note: I sincerely encourage you to feel entirely free to post any Civil War Letters, Stories or articles that you have in our Civil War History Files through the new Military Resources Website. We are trying "beef up" our Library and now those of you who have patiently stuck with us who aren't AOL Members can now participate. There is also an area for you to upload photos, if you would desire to share those with the Civil War History community. On the Web Site, there are links to our Civil War Library (Files, Firesides, and Photo's).

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FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WE REALLY WELCOME YOU TO OUR MERRY BAND" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU, TRADING QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS AND ESPECIALLY YOUR CAMARADERIE!!! :-)... COME AGAIN OFTEN, WE DO INDEED "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY..

Every first-timer to the American Civil War History SIG gets put on the newsletter distribution automatically, because we like to send you a "Thank You Card" for coming to visit and this is our way of doing so. We hope to give you an opportunity to jump right in with us. If you desire NOT to receive the newsletter, then just drop us an email saying UNSUBSCRIBE and we will quickly remove your screen name from distribution. We certainly don't want to clog your mailbox with unwanted material. Also many of you pass on the newsletter to others that don't subscribe to AOL. We really want to thank you for spreading the word. I would also like to let you know that we would be happy to add them to our list if they have email of any sort. We distribute everywhere to those that have requested it. AOL membership is not a requirement although we'd love to see you in the Chat Room :D

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Did you know...............
Occupied all the time of the Corinth [Mississippi] campaign with the wounded in the rear of General Halleck's army, "Mother Bickerdyke" was put in charge of the Main Hospital at Corinth, when our force entered that place on 30 May, 1862. While there, her indomitable force and determination to serve the soldiers had another trial and another victory. Learning that a brigade was to march through the hospital grounds, and knowing that the soldiers would be nearly exhausted from their long march under a burning sun, she got out her barrels of water which had been brought for the men in the hospital, had a corps of her assistants ready with pails and dippers, and gave the soldiers water as they passed through. When the commanding officer came up, Mrs. Bickerdyke asked that the men be halted; but he refused, and, going ahead, ordered his men to march along. At the same time a voice in the rear -- that of Mrs. Bickerdyke -- was heard giving the reverse order, "Halt!" in clear tones. The woman's order was obeyed, and the "Tin Cup Brigade" worked energetically for a few minutes, rejoicing in the triumph of their commander.

------Frank Moore

............. and there you have it!

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THE HELP DESK

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: The new Military Resouces Website (Website is listed above in the Fireside) has a myriad of options for you. Here are some the choices: US Military Records, Conscription/Draft Records, Civil War Battle Names, Secession of the Confederate States, Your Civil War Ancestors - Where to Begin, Military Resources on the Internet, links to the Stories, Files and Talks of the American Civil War History Chat on AOL, message boards and many, many others. Your comments and suggestions are always welcome.

Additional Note from the Webmaster: Although we are thrilled to provide this area for you now, we want you to know that we are still building it and MORE files, Regimental Histories, etc., will be available in the near future. Stay Tuned!

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Weekly Web Sites We've Received


From: LaddofOhio@aol.com

* * * * * 

From: HOST GFS CHUCK@aol.com

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MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!..

Here's how it works... If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will post it here... Other members see your request, some being in the near vicinity, are willing to assist, and can email you directly (This protects your privacy) to work out the details. We HIGHLY recommend the "Requester" pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" assistance between members (with the exception of defraying film and postage costs). Do unto others as.... you know
:-) Keep us posted on how this is working, so we can share them in the "Fireside"!!
HOST GFS Jim

IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED ANSWER(S) TO YOUR QUESTIONS, PLEASE BE SURE TO LET US KNOW!!!!!
Thanks!! - The Editors

We have had some gracious members offer their assistance in this area. Their screen names and areas they have offered to help in are listed.... Please honor their "goodness" and don't abuse them :-)....
We ask that you do follow the guidelines indicated above....

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OUR WEEKLY READING
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs, and Poems evenings)

This was provided to us by MM3C11259@aol.com The following is from Writing and Fighting the Civil War by Wm Styple which contains letters from Union soldiers to the NY Sunday Mercury between 1861 and 1865. The Mercury actively solicited these letters and the soldiers were happy to accomodate. In return, the Mercury mailed copies of the newspaper to the troops at the front. This is a rich source of primary source material written in the soldiers own words. Letters are primarily from NY regiments, most of which are represented.

The following is a description of the Battle (skirmish) of Big Bethel. The 8th NY regiment known as the Washington Grays also participated and took casualties from both enemy and friendly fire because their uniforms were the same color as the Confederates. Big Bethel was probably the 1st armed conflict of the Civil War and occured about a month prior to 1st Manassas (1st Bull Run to Northerners)

June 23,1861
FIFTH REGIMENT (DURYEE"S ZOUAVES)

The following extract is from the pen of Dan. Hart, Orderly Sargeant Co. F of Duryee's Zouaves (or Advance Guard) formerly clerk to the Central Park Commissioners. It tells the whole story of the battle of Big Bethel in a nutshell, and shows that a necessity exists for better arms. When the company came in from evening parade on Sunday [June 9 ], I noticed the captain examining the muskets,etc and immediately "smelt a mice." Later in the evening, He ordered me confidentially to see that the men were supplied with ammunition and rations for a day, which I did; and after tattoo, was ordered to rouse them silently at 11 o'clock, and as orderly, was informed that we were bound on business. Of course there was little sleep in my tent. We put our house in order, wrote a little note to the folks, in case we should be unfortunate, and inclosed them where they could be found. At 11 o'clock we were mustered, and, to our suprise, found the whole regiment under arms, not a light being visable, or a word spoken above a whisper. We marched out to the road from camp, and, joining with the artillery, proceeded to Hampton, where we crossed the creek in large boats, and resumed our march. It was a curious occasion; the darkness and silence, and the steady, firm step of such a body of men, trained like a machine- nobody knowing where or what we were ordered to, but all feeling that something was impending, and that probably the time of some of us was come. So we continued until after daylight, where we heard the quick discharge of arms at our front- a few cries, and then all was still. A moment afterward, the skirmishers took to the rear several prisoners, and we learned that we had driven in the enemy's pickets.

In this condition, and without any time for rest, we were ordered to form a line, and make ready for a charge on the enemy. The artillery advanced, and galloped up the road directly in our front. In a moment or two we heard a heavy report, followed by a volley from the concealed foe, and the way the shivers of grape and cannon-balls came whistling around us, and tearing up the ground, was neither interesting nor pleasant. Thereafter, as we saw the flash, we dropped to mother earth in quick time. We were ordered to a wood by the roadside, under cover of which we hoped to proceed; but the enemy soon had our range, and the boys began to fall around me. It was a horrible time, and one to appeal to the stoutest heart. However, on we pushed, the balls crashing all over us, and through the trees, as if through a wheat-field. A man who was crouching beside a tree by me, was killed instantly by a cannon- ball, and numbers were hurt close by. All we could do was to crouch on the ground and remain quiet. Some of our men went to the enemy's flank and endeavored to harass them, but only partially succeeded, as our miserable muskets will not carry; they are almost worthless.

DANIEL H. HART

==============================================

A BIT OF COMMUNITY...

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedback's, Items of Interest and Plea's for HELP...

From: BitsOBlueNGray@aol.com
A Civil War Symposium is to be held in Steubenville, OH on Saturday, April 13, 2002. Sponsored by the Jefferson Co. Historical Association in conjunction with Jefferson Community College, it will concentrate on the role of, and events in, the Upper Ohio River Valley during the Civil War.

Scheduled to appear:
John Mattox, Local Historian- Underground Railroad
Don Markle, Author- "Spies and Spymasters of the Civil War"- David Homer Bates, Steubenville native and chief telegrapher for the Union- Telegraphic Espionage
Troy Harmon, Author and National Park Ranger- Gettysburg
Roger Pickenpaugh, Author- "Rescue by Rail"- Railroads in the Civil War
Gary Casteel, Author and Historic Sculptor- (Works include the new Longstreet Monument in Gettysburg)- Civil War Memorialization
Lyle Zurla, Historian- Morgan's Raid
Gerry Reilly, Historian- West Virginia Independence Hall, Wheeling, and WV Independence
Rhea Redd, Historian- The Children's Civil War- Day long demonstrations

There will be day long displays and demonstrations by collectors, re-enactors, and vendors, and additional historians and educators will be available for informal discussions. (Any genealogical or historical groups wishing to set up a display are invited to contact J. C. H. A.)
A teacher's workshop is planned for Fri. April 12.

All proceeds to benefit J. C. H. A. educational programs.
Donation: $20 in advance, $25 at door. Seniors and Students $15. Group rates available.

For more information or to register, contact:
Jeff Evans
Jefferson County Historical Association
P. O. Box 4268
Steubenville, OH, 43952
(740) 283-1133
e-mail: jchistory@hotmail.com

{{{{{Jayne}}}}} thanks for the notice

* * * * *

From: BitsOBlueNGray@aol.com
The April 2002 Column for Bits of Blue and Gray is on the site for your reading. Topic this month is Nathan Bedford Forrest. http://www.bitsofblueandgray.com/April2002.htm

{{Jayne}} We've been waiting.

* * * * *

From: IndySenior@aol.com
Thank you for the information. After last nights session I decided to check out my Robert Griffin on the Ancestry site. The information I had was handwritten by Robert's brother James's daughter Sarah. "...John and Robert were in the Civil War. Robert starved to death in Libby Prison"

On Ancestry I found that Robert's mother [my grgrgrandmother] Elizabeth Griffin applied for a pension. The scanned microfilm of index card gave me information that Robert had served from KY and the unit in which he served. The family lived in Aurora, IN and most of the male members of family worked on the Ohio River. I knew that OH or KY as well as IN were possible locations.

With the state and unit number I was then able to find on Ancestry the service record for the correct Robert Griffin. It stated he died as a prisoner in Andersonville, GA . It also stated he was POW on 01 December 1863. I know this date is prior to Andersonville Prison date.

I then did a "Google" search. I found a site listing Kentucky Soldiers Who Died at Andersonville Prison. There I found my Robert Griffin listed Griffin, Robert H., Pvt 11 KY Cav, Co E grave 12022.

Robert Henry Griffin was born April 11, 1845 in Aurora, Dearborn, IN and enlisted in Louisville, KY 20 August 1862. He was probably only 19 when he died in the prison.

I will spend the $ and send for his military record. Once again I have been reminded to check the information ...don't take undocumented statements as fact.

I hope I am able to get home from work next Thursday in time to join you around the Fireside.

Bev

{{Bev}} Great story ! I really wanted to share your success with the membership because as you say and we so often forget; "check the information ...don't take undocumented statements as fact." Your information was correct just the wrong location.... LOL I love it!

* * * * *

Subj: Fwd: 4TH IOWA CAVALRY
Date: 3/19/02 9:16:49 AM Mountain Standard Time
From: SusiCP@aol.com
This was passed on by Susi from one of here subscriptions:

Two of my great uncles, James P. and Robert K. Miller served in Company D of the 4th Iowa Cavalry. They served from very early in the Civil War until after the War. The Miller family lived in Mount Pleasant at that time.

A very good book about the 4th, "The History Of A Cavalry Regiment" by William Forse Scott makes very interesting reading for Iowa Civil War buffs. I bought my copy at a Civil War show in Nashville about ten years ago.

The capture of "Corp Jacob Wright" is mentioned in the book.
George Miller (geocarmil@aol.com)

==============================================

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War", with byproducts of laughter, and comraderie!

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly Fireside."

AND Hey! TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :)

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We really "fire up" with what members bring to the discussions, and we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif," just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "post-haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events*****

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Chat Room (On AOL Only) with hosts HOST GFS Amy, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Jim and our many faithful friends :)

3/28/02 - William Barker Cushing and the North Carolina Sound - Part 2 by HOST GFS Jim

4/4/02 - The James Dunwoody Bulloch Story by MM3C11259 (Ted Fisher).

4-11-02 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night.

4/18/02 - The Exploits of General John Frederick Hartranft as compiled by Harry Sprohnie, who will be joining us as our guest for this special evening.

Editor's NOTE: I could also have misspelled Harry's last name, but I'll correct is as soon as I find out from Amy

4/25/02 - OPEN CHAT

5/02/02 - We have a special Guest - Don Gallagher who will be talking to us about "Reading the Civil War". This promises to be a great evening.... Don't miss this one.

Editor's NOTE: this date is tenative until we get confirmation from Don, so be watching.

We'll See You Thursday Night..!
Your Joyful, Intelligent and Fun-lovin' Host's & Hostess's :-)
HOST GFS Jim, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Amy

Hear Ye .... Hear Ye
"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 24 March 2002

Our Mission: To serve all genealogists by providing an enjoyable online environment with as many helpful and reliable resources as possible.

==============================================

Thursday night was great fun with the telling of the final part of William Barker Cushing's tale. The complete story is now posted in the "New Files" upload in the Genealogy Forum of the library and GFS Brenda is posting it on the website as well. Enjoy!

This coming Thursday is The James Dunwoody Bulloch Story by MM3C11259 (Ted Fisher). Ted is one of our own members and you certainly don't want to miss this one. Come on out and join us.

* * * * *
21-23 June 2002 - Women and the Civil War, Frederick, MD

The Sixth Conference on Women and the Civil War will be 21-23 June 2002 at Hood College, Frederick, MD. The event focuses on the service of women to their country during the War Between the States. QUESTIONS: E-mail: roslin@nfis.com or call (301) 293-2820 or WWW: http://www.womenandthecivilwar.org

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6 April 2002 - Civil War Seminar, Pittsburgh, PA

The Allegheny City Society and Greater Pittsburgh Civil War Round Table will conduct a Civil War Seminar at the Babcock Meeting Center, 3382 Babcock Blvd, Ross Twp, Pittsburgh, PA on 6 April 2002. "Bitter April - The Final Days of the Army of Northern Virginia" is the second seminar for Monument Preservation, featuring distinguished authors and historians, Bud Robertson, Bill Lazenby, Chris Calkins and Ron Wilson, who will discuss the days leading up to the surrender at Appomattox. The first seminar helped raise over $2,000 to repair and protect the Civil War Soldier's Monument in historic West Park on Pittsburgh's North Side. QUESTIONS: (412) 321-4502 or: http://www.grpghcwrt.org.

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24 Aug. 2002 - Museum Field Trip, Pittsburgh, PA

The Allegheny City Society and Greater Pittsburgh Civil War Round Table will have a Field Trip by bus to The Civil War Museum in Harrisburg on 24 Aug. 2002. Cost is: $50 per person, lunch included. We will need a deposit of $25 per person by April 22, with the balance of $25 due by July 22.

For additional information contact: (412) 321-4502 or: http://www.grpghcwrt.org or write:
Allegheny City Society and Greater Pittsburgh Civil War Round Table, P.O.Box 100255, Pittsburgh, PA. 15233

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Civil War History & Genealogy Forum Related Activities and Sites
Available for your Enjoyment and Research


War Between the States (Tracing your Civil War Ancestors)
With HOST GFS Amy and HOST GFS Wolford on
Friday evenings at 9:00 PM EDT in the Golden Gates Chat Room
of the Genealogy Forum (ONLY ON AOL) at KEYWORD: ROOTS

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"Genealogy Forum's Military Resources" Website
devoted to Civil War History and the material presented in
the American Civil War History Special Interest Group
in the Genealogy Forum of America On-Line.
The address is:
http://www.genealogyforum.rootsweb.com/gfaol/resource/Military/

The Weekly Fireside Archives
http://www.genealogyforum.rootsweb.com/gfaol/resource/Military/Fireside.htm

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The Genealogy Forum Mailing List Signup
You may subscribe by sending an email to:
GOLDEN-GATE-L-request@rootsweb.com
Title the subject of the email SUBSCRIPTION and type "Subscribe"
in the body of the email message.

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Editor's Note: I sincerely encourage you to feel entirely free to post any Civil War Letters, Stories or articles that you have in our Civil War History Files through the new Military Resources Website. We are trying "beef up" our Library and now those of you who have patiently stuck with us who aren't AOL Members can now participate. There is also an area for you to upload photos, if you would desire to share those with the Civil War History community. On the Web Site, there are links to our Civil War Library (Files, Firesides, and Photo's).

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FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WE REALLY WELCOME YOU TO OUR MERRY BAND" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU, TRADING QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS AND ESPECIALLY YOUR CAMARADERIE!!! :-)... COME AGAIN OFTEN, WE DO INDEED "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY..

Every first-timer to the American Civil War History SIG gets put on the newsletter distribution automatically, because we like to send you a "Thank You Card" for coming to visit and this is our way of doing so. We hope to give you an opportunity to jump right in with us. If you desire NOT to receive the newsletter, then just drop us an email saying UNSUBSCRIBE and we will quickly remove your screen name from distribution. We certainly don't want to clog your mailbox with unwanted material. Also many of you pass on the newsletter to others that don't subscribe to AOL. We really want to thank you for spreading the word. I would also like to let you know that we would be happy to add them to our list if they have email of any sort. We distribute everywhere to those that have requested it. AOL membership is not a requirement although we'd love to see you in the Chat Room :D

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Did you know...............

The Raider Shenandoah was in the Aleutians off Alaska sinking Union whaling ships when her captain was notified by a British whaler that Lee had surrendered in April of 1865 and the Confederacy had ceased to exist. Because of the Shenandoah's mostly British crew, the Shenandoah was sailed back to England under the Confederate flag. Upon arrival in Nov. 1865, the Confederate flag was lowered, the ship sold and the crew paid off. As such, the Shenandoah was the last Confederate unit to lower it's flag in surrender at the end of the Civil War.

............. and there you have it!

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THE HELP DESK

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: The new Military Resouces Website (Website is listed above in the Fireside) has a myriad of options for you. Here are some the choices: US Military Records, Conscription/Draft Records, Civil War Battle Names, Secession of the Confederate States, Your Civil War Ancestors - Where to Begin, Military Resources on the Internet, links to the Stories, Files and Talks of the American Civil War History Chat on AOL, message boards and many, many others. Your comments and suggestions are always welcome.

Additional Note from the Webmaster: Although we are thrilled to provide this area for you now, we want you to know that we are still building it and MORE files, Regimental Histories, etc., will be available in the near future. Stay Tuned!

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Weekly Web Sites We've Received

From: AJWRJW@aol.com

Lessons of Liberty
http://www.va.gov/Veteranedu/

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MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!..

Here's how it works... If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will post it here... Other members see your request, some being in the near vicinity, are willing to assist, and can email you directly (This protects your privacy) to work out the details. We HIGHLY recommend the "Requester" pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" assistance between members (with the exception of defraying film and postage costs). Do unto others as.... you know
:-) Keep us posted on how this is working, so we can share them in the "Fireside"!!
HOST GFS Jim

IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED ANSWER(S) TO YOUR QUESTIONS, PLEASE BE SURE TO LET US KNOW!!!!!
Thanks!! - The Editors

We have had some gracious members offer their assistance in this area. Their screen names and areas they have offered to help in are listed.... Please honor their "goodness" and don't abuse them :-)....
We ask that you do follow the guidelines indicated above....

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OUR WEEKLY READING
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs, and Poems evenings)

Mister, Here's Your Mule

A farmer came to camp, one day, with milk and eggs to sell,
Upon a mule who oft would stray to where no one could tell,
The farmer, tired of his tramp, for hours was made a fool
By ev'ryone he met in camp, by "Mister, here's your mule."

Come on, come on, come on, old man,
And don't be made a fool,
I'll tell the truth as best I can,
John Morgan's got your mule.

His eggs and chickens all were gone before the break of day,
The mule was heard of all along - that's what soldiers say;
And still he hunted all day long - alas! The witless fool -
While ev'ry man would sing the song, "Mister, here's you mule."

Come on, come on, come on, old man,
And don't be made a fool,
I'll tell the truth as best I can,
John Morgan's got your mule.

The soldiers now, in laughing mood, on mischief were intent,
They toted muly on their backs, around from tent to tent;
Through this hole and that they pushed his head, and made a rule
To shout with humorous voices all, "Mister, here's your mule."

Come on, come on, come on, old man,
And don't be made a fool,
I'll tell the truth as best I can,
John Morgan's got your mule.

Alas! One day the mule was missed, ah! Who could tell his fate?
The farmer, like a man bereft, searched early and searched late;
And as he passed from camp to camp, with stricken face, the fool
Cried out to ev'ryone he met, "Oh, Mister, where's my mule?

Come on, come on, come on, old man,
And don't be made a fool,
I'll tell the truth as best I can,
John Morgan's got your mule.

:………Author Unknown

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY...

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedback's, Items of Interest and Plea's for HELP...

From: BitsOBlueNGray@aol.com
A Civil War Symposium is to be held in Steubenville, OH on Saturday, April 13, 2002. Sponsored by the Jefferson Co. Historical Association in conjunction with Jefferson Community College, it will concentrate on the role of, and events in, the Upper Ohio River Valley during the Civil War.

Scheduled to appear:
John Mattox, Local Historian- Underground Railroad
Don Markle, Author- "Spies and Spymasters of the Civil War"- David Homer Bates, Steubenville native and chief telegrapher for the Union- Telegraphic Espionage
Troy Harmon, Author and National Park Ranger- Gettysburg
Roger Pickenpaugh, Author- "Rescue by Rail"- Railroads in the Civil War
Gary Casteel, Author and Historic Sculptor- (Works include the new Longstreet Monument in Gettysburg)- Civil War Memorialization
Lyle Zurla, Historian- Morgan's Raid
Gerry Reilly, Historian- West Virginia Independence Hall, Wheeling, and WV Independence
Rhea Redd, Historian- The Children's Civil War- Day long demonstrations

There will be day long displays and demonstrations by collectors, re-enactors, and vendors, and additional historians and educators will be available for informal discussions. (Any genealogical or historical groups wishing to set up a display are invited to contact J. C. H. A.)
A teacher's workshop is planned for Fri. April 12.

All proceeds to benefit J. C. H. A. educational programs.
Donation: $20 in advance, $25 at door. Seniors and Students $15. Group rates available.

For more information or to register, contact:
Jeff Evans
Jefferson County Historical Association
P. O. Box 4268
Steubenville, OH, 43952
(740) 283-1133
e-mail: jchistory@hotmail.com

NOTE: We'll leave this up to remind you until the session is history!

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From: Texzilla2@aol.com
Update to the information published in the Fireside Weekly some weeks earlier answering the question; "When did states secede"?

South Carolina December 20, 1860
Secession was declared on that day, but 24 December was the date on which the act was effective, and was so noted in the 20 December declaration.

Mississippi January 8, 1861
Florida January 10, 1861
Alabama January 11, 1861
Georgia January 19, 1861
Louisiana January 26, 1861
Texas February 1, 1861
Incorrect. Texas's secession was not legal until 2 March 1861; the Secession Convention handed down an ordinance, but it could not be legal until both the Legislature had passed it, and it had to been ratified by registered voters (28 February). I have the complete "Journal of the Texas Secession Convention" here.

Virginia April 17, 1861 **
**West Virginia separated from VA August 20, 1862 and was admitted to the Union June 20, 1863.
Arkansas May 6, 1861
North Carolina May 20, 1861
Tennessee June 8, 1861
Kentucky and Missouri both had Union and Confederate governments throughout the entire war.
Kentucky's Legislature handed down an Ordinance of Secession on 20 November 1861 at Russellville in Logan County. Missouri did likewise at Neosho, Barton County on 31 October 1861. To be sure, Missouri's Yankee government was illegal, usurping that which was elected; having heavy Missouri connections helps with facts otherwise put forth by the "winners." Perhaps this site's owners could make corrections?
Désirée

{{{Desiree}}} thanks for the update. I did send your information back to the website we extracted this from.

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From: PegBrill1330@aol.com
It's been a long time since I've been able to be part of the Thursday night chat group and I miss it. I do love reading your newsletters, however, and pass them on to my friends. I have one particular friend who has an interest and since she is not on AOL cannot be a part of the Thursday night Civil War buffs. Do you think you could email her a copy of the Fireside whenever you send it out?

I know she will appreciate it. She is also looking for reenactors who may be researching the US Co. B, 16 PA Infantry. Maybe Tegs can help her with that one. She is trying to find information on an elusive ancestor by the name of William Williard who lived in Lykens Twp. Dauphin Co., PA, served in the Civil war and was assumed captured by rebels in Atlanta, GA about August 1864. I appreciate any help you can give her. Someday I hope to be able to resume the Thursday night chat.

Regards to all,
Peggy

{{{Peggy}}} it's great hearing from you. We have your friend on distribution now and I removed her email address for privacy :-) Might be Tom can point her in the right direction on the PA Infantry unit. Amy might also be able help out on this one. By the way; have your friend checkout the Genealogy Forum Website (listed above in the newsletter), which she does have access to over regular Internet.

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War", with byproducts of laughter, and comraderie!

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly Fireside."

AND Hey! TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :)

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We really "fire up" with what members bring to the discussions, and we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif," just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "post-haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events*****

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Chat Room (On AOL Only) with hosts HOST GFS Amy, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Jim and our many faithful friends :)

4/4/02 - The James Dunwoody Bulloch Story by MM3C11259 (Ted Fisher).

4-11-02 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night.

4/18/02 - The Exploits of General John Frederick Hartranft as compiled by Harry Sprohnie, who will be joining us as our guest for this special evening.

Editor's NOTE: I could also have misspelled Harry's last name, but I'll correct is as soon as I find out from Amy
.
4/25/02 - OPEN CHAT

5/02/02 - We have a special Guest - Don Gallagher who will be talking to us about "Reading the Civil War". This promises to be a great evening.... Don't miss this one.

Editor's NOTE: this date is tentative until we get confirmation from Don, so be watching.

We'll See You Thursday Night..!
Your Joyful, Intelligent and Fun-lovin' Host's & Hostess's :-)
HOST GFS Jim, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Amy

 

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