March 2001 Weekly Firesides

Hear Ye .... Hear Ye
"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 04 March 2001 

Our Mission: To serve all genealogists by providing an enjoyable online environment with as many helpful and reliable resources as possible.

Well I finally got in on the "tale-end" of Thursday night's session for Day 3 of the Gettysburg Story. I'm all cleaned up and "processing" again. Heh Heh It's one of my "funner" things to do, going through your computer with a fine-toothed comb looking for "little beasties".<G>

Last week in the newsletter, Jayne let you know one of our favorite folks (FBenway@aol.com) is having a hard time with his health and we're gonna keep him up here on the newsletter for your prayers and thoughts. Frank and Flo are family with this gathering and Frank's original CW poems have made us laugh and cry for a number of years. When they hurt, we hurt with them.. So, Thursday night for Songs, Letters and Poems night all we're going to read are Frank's Special Civil War Poems. We heartily invite you out to share with us. If you'd like to drop them a line, send it to Flo (FVJEB) and she'll get your notes to Frank....     Frank and Flo - we love ya!

We're still getting some really good feedback on our "query" about changes, improvements, suggestions for the Chat on Thursday night. Sooo, keep those cards and letters rolling. Heh Heh, It's great stuff!!!

Normally I have a piece in this spot for Music, but this week with all that's going on, I'm just going to ramble. Hope you don't mind.... The crew and I (Jayne, Tom and Amy) have encountered so many new people through this Chat Room that all of you have become like a second family to us.

True we focus on Civil War History and our ancestors that lived, fought and died during that time, but we also have learned much about you and you about us. There's something incredibly special about that merging that is very difficult to put into words. Even while we're doing our "paying jobs" and close family activities we're thinking about you and telling others stories about you and sharing memories. When we're in your vicinity while we're traveling on vacation or work, we find ourselves trying to track you down, giving you a phone call and trying to get together to "Really" meet you face to face. What a thrill that is for us. When we do finally meet, it's like we've known each other for years and are renewing an acquaintance long cherished. That's something new for me that has come to planet Earth with the arrival of the Internet into our everyday lives. And I am thrilled by that! It allows us to expand our relationships and friendships like never before.

My wife brought a poem to me to read the other day that I think most appropriate for this rambling and to attempt to let all of you know what we "The CW Crew" think about you! 

Everyone Needs Someone

People need people
and friends need friends,
And we all need love
for a full life depends
Not on vast riches
or great acclaim,
Not on success
or on workly fame,
But just in knowing
that someone cares
And holds us close
in their thoughts and prayers -
For only the knowledge
that we understood
Makes everyday living
feel WONDERFULLY GOOD,
And we rob ourselves
of life's greatest need
When we "lock up our hearts"
and fail to need
The outstreching hand
reaching to find
A kindred spirit
whose heart and mind
Are lonely and longing
to somehow share
Our joys and sorrows
to make us aware
That life's completeness
and richness depends
On the things we share
with our loved ones and friends!

---Anonymous

Civil War History & Genealogy Forum Related Announcements

War Between the States (Tracing your Civil War Ancestors)
With HOST GFS Amy and HOST GFS Wolford on
Friday evenings at 9:00 PM EDT in the Golden Gates Chat Room
of the Genealogy Forum (ONLY ON AOL) at KEYWORD: ROOTS

* * * * * 

Military Families Chat
With HOST GFS Beri, and HOST GFS Wolford
Wed, 8 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Conference Room
of the Genealogy Forum (ONLY ON AOL) at KEYWORD: ROOTS

* * * * * 

StateGenSites - Bits of Blue and Gray
http://www.stategensites.com/bitsofblueandgray/
HOST GFS Jayne is the editor of "Bits of Blue and Gray"
Watch for an annoucement of the GRAND RE-OPENING
when the site gets moved to it's new "home" The columns will
then be up to date and current
NOTE FROM JAYNE: If you have any Civil War Trivia questions
you would like to "contribute" I would be happy to have them!
BitsOBlueNGray@aol.com

Editor's Note: for those of you who are AOL members, I want to encourage you to feel entirely free to post any Civil War Letters, Stories or articles that you have in our Civil War History Files. There is also an area for you to upload photos, if you would desire to share those with the Civil War History community. Use "Keyword: ROOTS" to get to the Genealogy Main Screen. Then select Files, followed by selecting History and Culture and there you will find the two upload areas I mentioned; Civil War Files and Civil War Photos.

I would also note that the new Genealogy Forum Web Site is being constructed. On that Web Site, the Civil War History SIG will have an area to link to our Civil War Library (Lectures, Letters, Songs, Poems, Files, Firesides, and Photo's). When this is complete, anyone (not just AOL Members) will have access to all our material. We'll be sure to let you know when you can access it.

This coming Thursday is "GETTYSBURG - DAY 3" (we hope)!! We'll be looking for you, and we'll save you a seat by the fire :D 

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WE REALLY WELCOME YOU TO OUR MERRY BAND" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU, TRADING QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS AND ESPECIALLY YOUR CAMARADERIE!!! :-)... COME AGAIN OFTEN, WE DO INDEED "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY..

Every first-timer to the American Civil War History SIG gets put on the newsletter distribution automatically, because we like to send you a "Thank You Card" for coming to visit and this is our way of doing so. We hope to give you an opportunity to jump right in with us. If you desire NOT to receive the newsletter, then just drop us an email saying UNSUBSCRIBE and we will quickly remove your screen name from distribution. We certainly don't want to clog your mailbox with unwanted material. Also many of you pass on the newsletter to others that don't subscribe to AOL. We really want to thank you for spreading the word. I would also like to let you know that we would be happy to add them to our list if they have email of any sort. We distribute everywhere to those that have requested it. AOL membership is not a requirement although we'd love to see you in the Chat Room 

THE HELP DESK

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc.
From the main Genealogy Forum screen at Keyword "ROOTS," select the "File Library Center," then "History Files". At that point select "Civil War Files." Lectures and the Letters, Songs and Poems evenings are also posted in the "File Library Center" under "History Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Fireside's" when they eventually get there, after their 30 days in the New Files section, are posted in the "File Library Center" under "Meeting Logs and Newsletters".

Weekly Web Sites we've received

From: SusiCP@aol.com
Very Good Civil War Site:
http://www.geocities.com/cwfifedrum/
A great search site for Civil War Vets
http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/prisoners.htm

* * * * *

From: AJWRJW@aol.com
Pennsylvania Live - The Gettysburg Fire
http://www.pennlive.com/news/patriot-news/index.ssf?/base/news/9817152162201290.xm

* * * * *

From: HOST GFS GRACE@aol.com
The Library of Virginia Digital Library Program
Military History (CSA Rosters)
http://www.lva.lib.va.us/dlp/military

* * * * *

From: TAZ EQ@aol.com
Civil War Maps & Charts by State
http://anchor.ncd.noaa.gov/cwstates.htm

* * * * *

From: OldLive1@aol.com
My ancestor was killed in the Battle of Cold War. I would like to know more about that battle. I should say he was wounded there and taken to a prisoner hospital at Richmond and died there. He had had his arm shot off and was a tailor by trade.
Thank you.
Doris

The following was from Doris also:
I would like to see State Nights and maybe some list of people in those states that served in the service during the Civil War.
((((Doris)))) We'll certainly put together a night on the Battle of Cold Harbor. Watch the schedule. On the idea of a "States Night"; that is a neat suggestion. We'll ponder on how to put something like that together.....

MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!..

Here's how it works... If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will post it here... Other members see your request, some being in the near vicinity, are willing to assist, and can email you directly (This protects your privacy) to work out the details. We HIGHLY recommend the "Requester" pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" assistance between members (with the exception of defraying film and postage costs). Do unto others as.... you know :-) Keep us posted on how this is working, so we can share them in the "Fireside"!!
HOST GFS Jim

IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED ANSWER(S) TO YOUR QUESTIONS, PLEASE BE SURE TO LET US KNOW!!!!!
Thanks!! - The Editors

We have had some gracious members offer their assistance in this area. Their screen names and areas they have offered to help in are listed.... Please honor their "goodness" and don't abuse them :-).... We ask that you do follow the guidelines indicated above....

* * * * *

Originated by LCFlu@aol.com and passed on by SusiCP:
Hello:
Is anyone related to Hugh Boon born in Washington county, PA in 1834? I am doing a page about the 1st WV Cavalry (http://rootsweb.com/~wvwags/1wvc/1wvc-frm.htm), gradually adding information about each soldier in this regiment. I am interested in a genealogy of Hugh Boon, photos, etc. He received the Medal of Honor and I have that information.
Thanks
Linda

{{Linda}} Hope spreading the request helps. We'll see if this strikes a chord in our membership..... Thanks Susi for passing it on.

* * * * *

From: SKSPIES@aol.com
I love reading these weekly articles. Unfortunately, my schedule is such that I can no longer join, so I join thru the articles. I am wondering if you can help me identify an article that is owned by a friend? It is a walking stick in a dark wood, a snake carved along its length with a frog (as if the snake is chasing the frog), the words 'Alatoon GA 1864' and other decorations. It was found in a former boarding house in Russelville, KY. I have some pictures I can send you if you'd like. We'd like to know how to research it if not who it belonged to. Thanks for any help you can give us.
- Susan

If there are any "Civil War Artifact" experts out there, drop me an email (HOST GFS Jim) and I'll send you the pictures of this walking stick that Susan sent me. I've never seen anything like it....

* * * * *

From: QNavyWife@aol.com
Howdy!
I have a major need of some help of the faithful, especially those who may know something about Confederate soldiers (I am a Yankee girl!!!!) or have access to Confederate records. I am looking for info on a Gallette Madison Harlow, born in Barnett's Ford (this may be Barnetta Ford.....not sure if we have a typo on the info as you'll see momentarily!) on Feb. 4, 1847 and died in Binghamton, NY on December 5, 1885. On his stone it states that he served in the late war under Gen. R. E. Lee. He is buried at the Lenox Rural Cemetery, just outside of Canastota, NY. Also buried with him are his wife Cornelia Northrup Harlow and his brother George Lewis Harlow. The listing I have the info from says that George was born in Barnetta Ford, Orange Co., VA. I am not sure which is correct at this point and haven't had a chance to look for either on a map of VA. I need to find out more about Gallette. I find it strange that a Confederate soldier is buried so far north (for those who don't know where Canastota is, we are about 20 miles east of Syracuse, on the Thruway). Now, Binghamton isn't too far from Elmira, so he may have been a prisoner at Elmira Prison and stayed in the North after the war.....his brother somehow ended up here too.....maybe their father also served and died, and George ended up with his brother.... Don't know at this point. The reason I am hunting for this man and anything at all that I can find, is that my CW Round Table is interested in this and also, I'd like to find someone who is related to this man....his family may not actually know where he is...at least his southern relatives. We may be able to get some type of marker put up honoring him also. So, any help anyone might be able to give would be gratefully appreciated!
Thanks!
Robin

{{{Robin}}} - check out JRebsBelle's note just below this.

From: JRebsBelle@aol.com
Please contact the United Daughters of the Confederacy in Richmond VA for information regarding this soldier. Is his regiment listed on the marker?

The United Daughters of the Confederacy
http://www.hqudc.org/
I wish you luck. And if you do find out something, please notify me.

Mary Rose
P.S. I always enjoy the Weekly Fireside, and especially liked the story of Booker T. Washington.

{{Mary Rose}} Thank you for the note to Robin and I'm glad you liked the story. I did too! :-)

Update From: QNavyWife@aol.com
Thanks for the interest in this hunt! I have found out some new info as the woman who is helping me has found his obit and it lists his regiment..... Actually, it appears his name is Catlette or Calette and not Galette..... when spring comes, if it ever does up here in NY, I will have to go check his marker and see what it actually says. I got his name from the listing at the cemetery and it might have been misread. Anyway, he served with Moseby in his rather famous Moseby's Raiders, which if I am not mistaken was the 43rd VA Cavalry. Later he served as an orderly on Gen. Lee's staff and was apparently a favorite of Gen. Lee's. When I get all the info together, I will send a write up to add to the Fireside and/or share on a Thursday. If you would like an actual typed copy of whatever I find, email me and let me know. I'll contact the UDC in VA to see what they might have on this soldier! Maybe I can even get his pension info if there is any!
Robin

* * * * *

Here's more feedback on the Fort Bayard query a few weeks back.
From: MamaGritz@aol.com
Jim
Fort Bayard, in New Mexico, is, or was, located near Pinos Altos. I have reference to it in two books I have. The first book: The MESCALERO APACHES, by C. L. Sonnichsen. The second book PIONEERS OF THE MESILLA VALLEY, by Paxton P. Price. Don't know if this helps.
Also the US Army had what was known as the California Column, in the Las Cruces, New Mexico area during the Civil War. My husbands great-great -grandfather was a member of this unit. I have copies of his pension records as well as military records, if you would like more info on this group.
Kris(MamaGritz)

{{{Kris}}} Thanks for the additional information..... CrashHup - here's a bit more information.....

A BIT OF COMMUNITY...


Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information,
Feedback's, Items of Interest and Plea's for HELP... 

Only one more week to go!!!!!!

From: AndersonvilleCW@aol.com
Hey Jim,
Thought you might want to spread the word.....
Andersonville Living history

Andersonville National Historic Site Presents

Andersonville Revisited

This unique living history program offers visitors the opportunity to see and experience what life was like at the infamous Civil War camp.

Living history Re-enactors will portray
Andersonville Prisoners and Guards.

Saturday, March 10, 2001

10:00 AM Prisoner Arrival and Shebang Building
10:30 AM Guard Drill and Demonstration
11:00 AM Artillery Talk ( Earthwork - North end of the Prison )
12 NOON Issuing of Rations
1:00 PM Arrival of Fresh Fish
2:00 PM Artillery Talk ( Earthwork - North end of the Prison )
2:30 PM Guard Inspection of Prison
3;00 PM Escape and Punishment
3:30 PM Guard Drill and Demonstration
4:00 PM Raider Attack
5:00 PM Park Gates Close
6:30 PM Park Gates Reopen for Candle Lantern Tours
7;00 PM Candle Lantern Tours Begin

Information Regarding Candle Lantern Tours

Saturday, March 10, 2001 7:00 PM
Tours Begin Every 20 Minutes and Last Approximately 45 Minutes
Reservations are Required for the Lantern Tours. Reservations can be Made Beginning February 10, 2001
by Calling 229-924-0343 Extensions 201 or 202.

Please do not be late for your Scheduled Tour Time.
Dress for the Weather and Wear Sturdy Shoes.
A Flashlight Would be Helpful for use From the Parking Area
to the Beginning Point of the Tour.
Lantern Tours may not be Appropriate for Pre-School Age Children
The Main Park Entrance will be open at 6:30 for the Lantern Tours. Follow the Signs for Parking.

Sunday, March 11, 2001

10:00 AM Shebang Building
10:30 AM Guard Drill and Demonstration
11:00 AM Artillery Talk ( Earthwork - North end of the Prison )
12:00 NOON Issuing of Rations
1:00 PM Arrival of Fresh Fish
1:30 PM Guard Inspection of Prison
2:00 PM Artillery Talk ( Earthwork - North end of the Prison )
2:30 PM Guard Drill and Demonstration
3:00 PM Escape and Punishment
5:00 PM Park Gates Close

Andersonville National Historic Site is Located 10 Miles Northeast of Americus, Georgia on Highway 49. All Demonstrations and scenarios will be Presented in the Northeast Corner of the Historic Prison Site unless Otherwise Noted. Times, Demonstrations and Scenarios are Subject to Change. For more Information, Please Call 229-924-0343

Thanks
Kevin

{{Hey Kevin}} - thanks for letting us know. We'll be sure to spread the word!!!

* * * * * 

From: Rcbrooks1@aol.com
Have you ever discussed changing the time of this chat room to an earlier hour? I have tried to stay up and be part of the chat but I work hard all day and I'm just too tired to stay awake. I wish it could be moved.
Richard Brooks

"Richard" - thanks for your suggestion. We'll put our heads together with the Forum schedulers and see what comes of trying.....

* * * * * 

From: Belookn4@aol.com
Jim, thought that I would take a moment to share a concern with you and the group. There is a bill going before the Texas Senate that is asking that all Confederate Monuments be removed from the campus of the University of TX . (Lee, Jackson, Reagan & Johnston) The intent is to remove these forever, not just to relocate them or replace them at a later date, but to destroy them. Our Confederate history is under attack from every corner, when does it stop? Do they intend to erase it from the history books, from the records of every library, from the records of our government? Please help us stand and fight this bill, write and let Texas Legislature know how we feel. Below is a brief working of the bill and the name of the man posting this bill. I enjoy the Weekly Fireside and thought others might also feel concern about this problem.

Subj: Texas H.B. No. 953 relating to Confederate statues at the University of Texas at Austin

We were worried about this and now here it is.  I'm going to give you Rep. Burnam's  address. Burnam's address is Box 2910  Austin,TX 78711     His Austin phone # is 512-463-0740   His district phone # is 817-924-1997

(Bill was filed on Jan. 24th. by Rep. Lon Burnam-Fort Worth)

 By Burnam            H.B. No. 953
         Line and page numbers may not match official copy.
         Bill not drafted by TLC or Senate E&E.

                                A BILL TO BE ENTITLED
 1-1                                   AN ACT
 1-2    relating to Confederate statues at the University of Texas at
 1-3    Austin.
 1-4    BE IT ENACTED BY THE LEGISLATURE OF THE STATE OF TEXAS:
 1-5    SECTION 1. The University of Texas of Austin shall remove
 1-6    from public view all statues of Jefferson Davis, president of the
 1-7    Confederate States of America; Robert E. Lee, General in Chief of
 1-8    the Armies of the Confederate States; John H. Reagan, Postmaster
 1-9    General of the Confederate States; and Albert Sidney Johnston,
1-10   General of the Confederate States Army, located on the campus of
1-11  the university.  The statues may be placed in storage away from
1-12  public view or disposed of in any other way considered appropriate
1-13  by the board of regents of The University of Texas System.
1-14   SECTION 2.  This Act takes effect September 1, 2001.

"BeLookN4" Thanks for the heads up. "My" perception is not that it's Confederate History, but that it's "American" History that's being marked as "Not Acceptable" (whatever that could possibly mean) The history of our nation needs to stay intact and whole and accurate for those of us that would like to learn from and to implement by our daily actions and beliefs improvement in ourselves, not by "removing" segments that may be politically offensive to segments of our society. There are many areas of my nation's history that trouble me and I need history's presence (truthful and accurate) to resolve those questions for myself. Don't hide it from me.... :-) Sorry; there I go again.... Heh Heh 

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War", with byproducts of laughter, and comraderie!

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well. 

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget." 

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly Fireside."

AND Hey!, TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :)

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We really "fire up" with what members bring to the discussions, and we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif," just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events*****

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Chat Room (On AOL Only) with hosts HOST GFS Amy, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Jim and our many faithful friends :)

03/08/2001 - A Special Frank Benway (FBenway) Poems Night. Frank is one of our faithful members and he has so graciously contributed Civil War Poems over the years, by his own hand, that we'd like to focus just on "fruits of his labors". There's no way we'll get through all of them but we're gonna try. Come on out and enjoy with us. :-)

03/15/2001 - In honor of St. Patrick's Day The Irish Brigade - part 1 from HOST GFS TEG

03/22/2001 - The Irish Brigade - part 2 from HOST GFS TEG

03/29/2001 - OPEN CHAT

We'll See You Thursday Night..!
Your Joyful, Intelligent and Fun-lovin' Host's & Hostess's :-)
HOST GFS Jim, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Amy

Hear Ye .... Hear Ye
"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 11 March 2001

Our Mission: To serve all genealogists by providing an enjoyable online environment with as many helpful and reliable resources as possible.

This Thursday night we did Songs, Letters and Poems and specifically shared Frank Benway's Civil War Poems. They were just great and we want to say Thanks Frank for all the poems over the years.....

Jayne, Amy, Tom and I had a session last week to go over all the suggestions you've been sending in for our American Civil War History Special Interest Group. You have sent us some great suggestions and we encourage you to keep sending them in. We've already moved on a number of specific topics you desired and we're off working on the series ideas you gave us. We'll be sure to keep you posted as our planning comes together. This should spread out over the rest of this year. In the mean time, some of those specific topics have been gathered and are scheduled in the April time frame. Don't forget to check in on the Schedule of Upcoming Events. 

Music to Research by.....

Music .....
Since this month is St. Patrick's and all things Irish, I'm going to feature CD's from the Emerald Isle with some good Celtic pieces as well. To start off, there's a CD for those of you that are Traditionalists of Irish/Celtic Music. Back in the days when the Irish Bards were plying their trade with the songs and talent we fall in love with today, it is not too well known that the keepers and creators of the musical tradition were the Irish Ladies. Over time the men picked up that activity but in recent history the ladies have returned to resume their centuries old tradition of writing, playing and singing the Irish/Celtic music. The CD for this week is a collection of the greatest. The CD title is Her Infinite Variety, Celtic Women in Music & Song. I quote from an extract from Fiona Ritchie's foreward to this musical experience. "Music writers and radio interviewers often ask me how Celtic music has been able to secure this level of visibility. Why, they ask, has it captured the hearts and imaginations of so many people who did not grow up around this music? There's an obvious way to answer these questions: just listen to it. What you'll hear is the genuine article. This is a music for all seasons and for all time. It has grown with us, travelled with us, spoken for us, cried for us. It invites us to dance and get wild. It fills us with pride and emotion. It bids us sit quietly and listen: "Come all ye gentle maidens, combine and lend an ear."

So I invite you to listen to Eileen Ivers - fiddler, Sharon Shannon - button accordian player, Trion Ni Dhomhnaill - keyboard specialist, and the clear haunting voices of Mairead Ni Mhaonaigh of Atlan, Kathy Ryan, Karen Matheson of Capercaillie, Mary Dillon of Deanta. Niamh Parsons and Aoife Clancy grace us with songs they learned from their parents and grandparents. Let me know what you think.... :-)

Enjoy........  

Civil War History & Genealogy Forum Related Announcements

War Between the States (Tracing your Civil War Ancestors)
With HOST GFS Amy and HOST GFS Wolford on
Friday evenings at 9:00 PM EDT in the Golden Gates Chat Room
of the Genealogy Forum (ONLY ON AOL) at KEYWORD: ROOTS

* * * * * * * * * *

Military Families Chat
With HOST GFS Beri, and HOST GFS Wolford
Wed, 8 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Conference Room
of the Genealogy Forum (ONLY ON AOL) at KEYWORD: ROOTS

* * * * * * * * * *

StateGenSites - Bits of Blue and Gray
http://www.stategensites.com/bitsofblueandgray/
HOST GFS Jayne is the editor of "Bits of Blue and Gray"
Watch for an annoucement of the GRAND RE-OPENING
when the site gets moved to it's new "home" The columns will
then be up to date and current
NOTE FROM JAYNE: If you have any Civil War Trivia questions
you would like to "contribute" I would be happy to have them!
BitsOBlueNGray@aol.com

* * * * * * * * * *

Editor's Note: for those of you who are AOL members, I want to encourage you to feel entirely free to post any Civil War Letters, Stories or articles that you have in our Civil War History Files. There is also an area for you to upload photos, if you would desire to share those with the Civil War History community. Use "Keyword: ROOTS" to get to the Genealogy Main Screen. Then select Files, followed by selecting History and Culture and there you will find the two upload areas I mentioned; Civil War Files and Civil War Photos.

I would also note that the new Genealogy Forum Web Site is being constructed. On that Web Site, the Civil War History SIG will have an area to link to our Civil War Library (Lectures, Letters, Songs, Poems, Files, Firesides, and Photo's). When this is complete, anyone (not just AOL Members) will have access to all our material. We'll be sure to let you know when you can access it.

This coming Thursday is the first of a two part series on the Irish Brigade by Tom Gladwell (HOST GFS TEG) to stay in sync with the month of the Irish. We'll be watching out for you, and we'll save you a seat by the fire :D

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WE REALLY WELCOME YOU TO OUR MERRY BAND" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU, TRADING QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS AND ESPECIALLY YOUR CAMARADERIE!!! :-)... COME AGAIN OFTEN, WE DO INDEED "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY..

Every first-timer to the American Civil War History SIG gets put on the newsletter distribution automatically, because we like to send you a "Thank You Card" for coming to visit and this is our way of doing so. We hope to give you an opportunity to jump right in with us. If you desire NOT to receive the newsletter, then just drop us an email saying UNSUBSCRIBE and we will quickly remove your screen name from distribution. We certainly don't want to clog your mailbox with unwanted material. Also many of you pass on the newsletter to others that don't subscribe to AOL. We really want to thank you for spreading the word. I would also like to let you know that we would be happy to add them to our list if they have email of any sort. We distribute everywhere to those that have requested it. AOL membership is not a requirement although we'd love to see you in the Chat Room :D

THE HELP DESK

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc.
From the main Genealogy Forum screen at Keyword "ROOTS," select the "File Library Center," then "History Files". At that point select "Civil War Files." Lectures and the Letters, Songs and Poems evenings are also posted in the "File Library Center" under "History Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Fireside's" when they eventually get there, after their 30 days in the New Files section, are posted in the "File Library Center" under "Meeting Logs and Newsletters".

Weekly Web Sites we've received
From: BitsOBlueNGray@aol.com:
Historical Image Collection: Home Page
http://www.treasurenet.com/images/
Behind the Stonewall - 360 Degree Panoramic Images from Civil War Battlefields
http://www.jatruck.com/stonewall/
Brothers Bound
http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~south1/bound.htm
Civil War Plymouth Pilgrims Descendants Society
http://home.att.net/~cwppds/homepage.htm
Info on Military Prisons and POW Camps
http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~south1/prisons.htm

* * * * * 

From: SusiCP@aol.com
Civil War Photograph Database (a paying site for serious researchers)
http://carlisle-www.army.mil/usamhi/PhotoDB.html#SearchForm 

* * * * *

From: CaptMeads@aol.com
James A. Garfield Auxiliary #1 Maryland - Sons of Union Vets of the Civil War
http://www.rootsweb.com/~mdjagsuv/home.html
Note: Jan is president of the Maryland/Delaware Sons of Union Vets chapter.

* * * * *

From: OldLive1@aol.com
My ancestor was killed in the Battle of Cold Harbor. I would like to know more about that battle. I should say he was wounded there and taken to a prisoner hospital at Richmond and died there. He had had his arm shot off and was a tailor by trade.
Thank you.
Doris

The following was from Doris also:
I would like to see State Nights and maybe some list of people in those states that served in the service during the Civil War.

((((Doris)))) Check the schedule for the upcoming story on Cold Harbor.... :-) Our solution for State Nights will be forthcoming :-)

Did you know...........

There was only one man in the battery who could cut hair - Sergeant Van McCreery -- and he had the only pair of scissors that could cut hair. So, every aspirant to this fashionable cut tried to make interest with Van to fix him up; and Van, who was very good natured, would, as he had time and opportunity, accommodate the applicant, and trim him close.

Several of us had gone under the transforming hands of this tonsorial artist, when Bob McIntosh got his turn. He had raven black, kinky hair that stuck up from his head in a bushy mass, and he hadn't had his hair cut for a good while, and it was very long an seemed longer than it was because it stuck out so from his head. Now, it was all to go, and a crowd of the boys gathered 'round to see the fun. The modus operandi was simple, but sufficient. The candidate sat on a stump with a towel tied 'round his neck, and he held up the corners making a receptacle to catch the hair as it was cut. Why this -- I don't know; force of habit I reckon ....

Van stood behind Bob and began over his right ear. He took the hair off clean, as he went, working from right to left over his head; the crowd around -- jeering the victim and making comments on his ever-changing appearance as the scissors progressed, making a clean sweep at every cut. We were thus making much noise with our fun at Bob's expense, until the shears had moved up to the top of his head, leaving the whole right half of the head as clean of hair as the palm of your hand, while the other half was still covered with this long, kinky, jet black hair, which in the absence of the departed locks looked twice as long as before - and Bob did present a spectacle that would have made a dog laugh. It was just as funny as it could be.

Just at that moment, in the midst of all this hilarity, suddenly we heard a man yell out something as he came running down the hill from the guns. We could not hear what he said. The next moment, he burst excitedly into our midst, and shouted out, "For god's sake, men, get your guns. The Yankees are across the river and are making for the guns. They will capture them before you get there, if you don't hurry."

This was a bolt out of the clear sky - but we jumped to the call. Everybody instantly forgot everything else and raced for the guns. I saw McCreery running with the scissors in his hand; he forgot that he had them - but it was funny to see a soldier going to war with a pair of scissors! I found myself running beside Bob McIntosh, with his hat off, his head half shaved and that towel, still tied round his neck, streaming out behind him in the wind.

Just before we got to the guns, Bob suddenly halted and said, "Good Heavens, Billy, it has just come to me what a devil of a fix I am in with my head in this condition. I tell you now that if the Yankees get too close to the guns, I am going to run. If they got me, or found me dead, they would say that General Lee was bringing up the convicts from the Penitentiary in Richmond to fight them. I wouldn't be caught dead with my head looking like this . . "

In the meantime, the enemy guns across the river opened on us and the shells were flying about us in lively fashion. It was rather a sudden transition from peace to war, but we had been at this business before; the sound of the shells was not unfamilar - so we were not unduly disturbed. We quickly got the guns loaded, and opened on that Infantry, advancing up the hill. We worked rapidly, for the case was urgent, and we made it as lively for those fellows as we possibly could. In a few minutes a pretty neat little battle was making the welkin ring .....

The battle ceased, the picket line was restored along the river bank, and all was quiet again. Bob McIntosh was more put out by all this business than anybody else - it had interrupted his hair cut. When we first got the guns into action, everybody was too busy to notice Bob's head. After we got settled down to work, I caught sight of that half-shaved head and it was the funniest object you ever saw. Bob was No. 1 at his gun, which was next to mine, and had to swab and ram the gun. This necessitated his constantly turning from side to side, displaying first this, and then the other side of his head. One side was perfectly white and bare; the other side was covered by a mob of kinky, jet black hair; but when you caught site of his front elevation, the effect was indescribable. While Bob was unconsciously making this absurd exhibition, it was too much to stand, even in a fight. I said to the boys around my gun. "Look at Bob." They looked and they could hardly work the gun for laughing.

Of course, when the fight was over McCreery lost that pair of scissors, or said he did. There was not another pair in camp, so Bob had to go about with his head in that condition for about a week - and he wearied of life. One day in his desperation, he said he wanted to get some of that hair off his head so much that he would resort to any means. He had tried to cut some off with his knife. One of the boys, Hunter Dupuy, was standing by chopping on the level top of a stump with a hatchet. Hunter said, "All right, Bob, put your head on this stump and I'll chop off some of your hair." The blade was so dull that it only forced a quantity of the hair fast to the stump, down into the wood, where it stuck, and held Bob's hair fast to the stump, besides pulling out a lot by the roots, and hurting Bob very much. He tried to pull loose and couldn't. Then he began to call Hunter all the names he could think of, and threatened what he was going to do to him when he got loose. Hunter, much hurt by such ungracious return for what he had done at Bob's request, said, "Why, Bob, you couldn't expect me to cut your hair with a hatchet without hurting some" -- which seemed reasonable. We made Bob promise to keep the peace, on pain of leaving him tied to the stump - then we cut him loose with our knives.

After some days, when we had had our fun, Van found the scissors and trimmed off the other side of his head to match - Bob was happy.

...............and there you have it.

MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!..


Here's how it works... If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will post it here... Other members see your request, some being in the near vicinity, are willing to assist, and can email you directly (This protects your privacy) to work out the details. We HIGHLY recommend the "Requester" pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" assistance between members (with the exception of defraying film and postage costs). Do unto others as.... you know :-) Keep us posted on how this is working, so we can share them in the "Fireside"!!
HOST GFS Jim

IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED ANSWER(S) TO YOUR QUESTIONS, PLEASE BE SURE TO LET US KNOW!!!!!
Thanks!! - The Editors

We have had some gracious members offer their assistance in this area. Their screen names and areas they have offered to help in are listed.... Please honor their "goodness" and don't abuse them :-).... We ask that you do follow the guidelines indicated above....

* * * * *

Originated by LCFlu@aol.com and passed on by SusiCP:
Hello:
Is anyone related to Hugh Boon born in Washington county, PA in 1834? I am doing a page about the 1st WV Cavalry (http://rootsweb.com/~wvwags/1wvc/1wvc-frm.htm), gradually adding information about each soldier in this regiment. I am interested in a genealogy of Hugh Boon, photos, etc. He received the Medal of Honor and I have that information.
Thanks
Linda

{{Linda}} Hope spreading the request helps. We'll see if this strikes a chord in our membership..... Thanks Susi for passing it on.

* * * * *

From: SKSPIES@aol.com
I love reading these weekly articles. Unfortunately, my schedule is such that I can no longer join, so I join thru the articles. I am wondering if you can help me identify an article that is owned by a friend? It is a walking stick in a dark wood, a snake carved along its length with a frog (as if the snake is chasing the frog), the words 'Alatoon GA 1864' and other decorations. It was found in a former boarding house in Russelville, KY. I have some pictures I can send you if you'd like. We'd like to know how to research it if not who it belonged to. Thanks for any help you can give us.
- Susan

If there are any "Civil War Artifact" experts out there, drop me an email (HOST GFS Jim) and I'll send you the pictures of this walking stick that Susan sent me. I've never seen anything like it....

* * * * *

From: Sharonny45@aol.com
Jim, I have an ancestor who died at Gettysburg. I have not been able to find a list that has names of Gettysburg deaths. His name is De Alton Dwight, he was from Illinois (well his parents were there). He was a traveling minister before the war started. Do you have any suggestions? Thanks for all the work you and your team do. Years ago I was a host and it is not easy. Thanks again.

{{{Sharon}} I have learned from HOST GFS TEG that there is a "Gettysburg Role of Honor". He's checking.

A BIT OF COMMUNITY... 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedback's, Items of Interest and Plea's for HELP...

From: SBoard5005@aol.com
Sorry I haven't been in the room lately, I am going to a Community College to learn to become a Veterinary Technician! Needless to say I have had a lot of homework! Maybe I can join you next thursday! Also, we received an email from a girl who saw the info I sent to you about John Hammond in the Fireside. Apparently she has a descendant from the Civil War who also fought in the New York 5th Volunteer Cavalry and is writing a thesis about it. Isn't that cool!

Susan
{{{{{Susan}}}}} We miss you too, but good luck on your studies. We're tickled to death how the material is getting around. :D

* * * * *

From: DdHober@aol.com
Can you tell me if you know anything more about AndersonCW. His website was removed from Angelfire. He had said that he was unsure of why they had removed it, also he had said he had sent them an email asking about this also. I know his website was a very wonderful research site and he put a great many hours into the site itself. Unfortunately he informed us he had no backup of the site.
Do you know anything more on this, and if there is anything we can do to help?
Thank you
"DdHober" - I have already responded to you, but I thought others might have encountered the same problem. Kevin's (AndersonCW) site is back up and operating. For some reason nobody seems to know (including Angelfire) it just disappeared. The main thing is Kevin is back up and he has backed up everything this round.

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War", with byproducts of laughter, and comraderie!

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well. 

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly Fireside."

AND Hey!, TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :)

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We really "fire up" with what members bring to the discussions, and we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif," just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events*****

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Chat Room (On AOL Only) with hosts HOST GFS Amy, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Jim and our many faithful friends :)

03/15/2001 - In honor of St. Patrick's Day The Irish Brigade - part 1 from HOST GFS TEG

03/22/2001 - The Irish Brigade - part 2 from HOST GFS TEG

03/29/2001 - OPEN CHAT

04/07/01 - " A Summer of War" - Tom Gladwell (HOST GFS TEG). Starts with Grant crossing the Rapidan and the Battles that followed. The Wilderness, Spotsylivania, Cold Harbor, The North Ann and the Seige of Petersburg.

04/12/01 - Letters, Songs and Poems night. Send in any material you want read in the room to HOST GFS Jim, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG or HOST GFS Amy and we'll be more than happy to do the reading for you :D

04/19/01 - OPEN CHAT

We'll See You Thursday Night..!
Your Joyful, Intelligent and Fun-lovin' Host's & Hostess's :-)
HOST GFS Jim, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Amy

Hear Ye .... Hear Ye
"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 18 March 2001

Our Mission: To serve all genealogists by providing an enjoyable online environment with as many helpful and reliable resources as possible.

This Thursday night we did Part 1 of the Irish Brigade story. If you missed it, you still have a chance to see Part 2 this week on the 22nd.

Jim, Amy, Tom and I had another good session last week going over all the suggestions you've been sending in for our American Civil War History Special Interest Group. We've received some great suggestions and we encourage you to keep sending them in. We've already moved on a number of specific topics you desired and we're off working on the series ideas you gave us. We're also working on some guest speakers. We'll be sure to keep you posted as our planning comes together. This should spread out over the rest of this year. In the mean time some of those specific topics have been gathered and are scheduled in the April time frame. There are some exciting times ahead for us!!! Don't forget to check in on the Schedule of Upcoming Events---There has been a change from last week's schedule!!

Jim is a travelin' man again for the week, so I'll be doing the newsletter again next week too so he'll have some time to catch up on much needed sleep that he'll be losing this week.

I just talked to Flo and Frank Benway. They are both doing as well as can be expected under the circumstances. They both asked me to thank you all for the prayers, good wishes and nice notes they've gotten. Be sure to send mail to FVJEB@aol.com as Frank doesn't go on the computer hardly at all anymore and by sending it to Flo, he'll be sure to get your message.

{{{{{Flo and Ben}}}}} my love and prayers to you both.

Music ..... This will continue when Jim resumes the newsletter.

Civil War History & Genealogy Forum Related Announcements

War Between the States (Tracing your Civil War Ancestors)
With HOST GFS Amy and HOST GFS Wolford on
Friday evenings at 9:00 PM EDT in the Golden Gates Chat Room
of the Genealogy Forum (ONLY ON AOL) at KEYWORD: ROOTS

* * * * * 

Military Families Chat
With HOST GFS Beri, and HOST GFS Wolford
Wed, 8 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Conference Room
of the Genealogy Forum (ONLY ON AOL) at KEYWORD: ROOTS

* * * * * 

StateGenSites - Bits of Blue and Gray
http://www.stategensites.com/bitsofblueandgray/
HOST GFS Jayne is the editor of "Bits of Blue and Gray"
Watch for an annoucement of the GRAND RE-OPENING
when the site gets moved to it's new "home" The columns will
then be up to date and current
NOTE FROM JAYNE: If you have any Civil War Trivia questions
you would like to "contribute" I would be happy to have them!
BitsOBlueNGray@aol.com

Editor's Note: for those of you who are AOL members, I want to encourage you to feel entirely free to post any Civil War Letters, Stories or articles that you have in our Civil War History Files. There is also an area for you to upload photos, if you would desire to share those with the Civil War History community. Use "Keyword: ROOTS" to get to the Genealogy Main Screen. Then select Files, followed by selecting History and Culture and there you will find the two upload areas I mentioned; Civil War Files and Civil War Photos.

I would also note that the new Genealogy Forum Web Site is being constructed. On that Web Site, the Civil War History SIG will have an area to link to our Civil War Library (Lectures, Letters, Songs, Poems, Files, Firesides, and Photo's). When this is complete, anyone (not just AOL Members) will have access to all our material. We'll be sure to let you know when you can access it.

This coming Thursday is the second of a two part series on the Irish Brigade by Tom Gladwell (HOST GFS TEG) to stay in sync with the month of the Irish. We'll be watching out for you, and we'll save you a seat by the fire :D

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WE REALLY WELCOME YOU TO OUR MERRY BAND" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU, TRADING QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS AND ESPECIALLY YOUR CAMARADERIE!!! :-)... COME AGAIN OFTEN, WE DO INDEED "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY..

Every first-timer to the American Civil War History SIG gets put on the newsletter distribution automatically, because we like to send you a "Thank You Card" for coming to visit and this is our way of doing so. We hope to give you an opportunity to jump right in with us. If you desire NOT to receive the newsletter, then just drop us an email saying UNSUBSCRIBE and we will quickly remove your screen name from distribution. We certainly don't want to clog your mailbox with unwanted material. Also many of you pass on the newsletter to others that don't subscribe to AOL. We really want to thank you for spreading the word. I would also like to let you know that we would be happy to add them to our list if they have email of any sort. We distribute everywhere to those that have requested it. AOL membership is not a requirement although we'd love to see you in the Chat Room :D

THE HELP DESK

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc.
From the main Genealogy Forum screen at Keyword "ROOTS," select the "File Library Center," then "History Files". At that point select "Civil War Files." Lectures and the Letters, Songs and Poems evenings are also posted in the "File Library Center" under "History Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Fireside's" when they eventually get there, after their 30 days in the New Files section, are posted in the "File Library Center" under "Meeting Logs and Newsletters".

Weekly Web Sites we've received
From: AJWRJW@aol.com:
The Regimental Quartermaster - Civil War Sutler Product Index
http://www.regtqm.com/productindex.html 

* * * * *

From: BitsOBlueNGray@aol.com:
Hargrett Library Rare Map Collection - American Civil War
http://www.libs.uga.edu/darchive/hargrett/maps/civil.html
Maryland in the Civil War
http://home.att.net/~secondmdus/sites.html

In honor of St. Patrick's Day
From: Djoi@aol.com

An Irish saying...

Always remember to forget,
The things that made you sad.
But never forget to remember,
The things that made you glad.

Always remember to forget,
The friends that proved untrue.
But don't forget to remember,
Those that have stuck by you.

Always remember to forget,
The troubles that passed away.
But never forget to remember,
The blessings that come each day.

* * * * * 
From: Bulldogtjr@aol.com

An Irish Blessing to all of you from a son of The Auld Sod...

May there always be work for your hands to do,
May your purse always hold a coin or two.

May the sun always shine on your windowpane,
May a rainbow be certain to follow each rain.

May the hand of a friend always be near you,
May God fill your heart with gladness to cheer you.

{{{{Dottie and Ted}}}}
Thanks for the wonderful greetings!!!! I guess we're all just a little Irish on St. Patty's Day!!
Jayne

* * * * * 

From: JRose10700@aol.com

St. Pat's Ramblin Rose Column

They've cancelled St. Patrick's Day in Dublin this year.
No parades. No music fests with pipe and tin whistles and bodrhan nor harp.
No rivers of Guinness flowing in the pubs while loyal Irishmen lift their voices - and their hearts - as they lift their pints and join in song.
"'Tis fear of foot and mouth disease, they'll be telling you. That dread scourge that afflicts beef cattle. That one that is raging throughout many of the Third World Countries from which the Irish import most of their beef.
They don't want all the bands and musicians and dancers and revellers - and tourists-from around the world bringing in the deadly virus.

The news of the cancellation rocked Irishmen everywhere. Cancel St. Patrick's Day? I'm thinking it is like the Health Department cancelling Christmas because the flu bug makes merry in the shopping crowds.

And what would the Good Saint be thinking about cancelling his big day?
He who drove the snakes out of the Emerald Isle put on hold for a little old virus that lurks in foreign cows? Say it isn't so!

Now just because the Irish have opted to skip the celebration this year, it does not mean that St. Pat will be forgotten. Some of the largest celebrations each year in his honor are held elsewhere. New York City, for instance, where the Sons of Erin stage a massive blowout. Savannah, GA., for another, where the O'Hara's and the Murphy's and the Sullivan's praise their favorite saint with a decidedly Southern accent.

Nevertheless, Dublin is the capital of the March 17 worldwide fete, and its defection this year will make many a lad of the Auld Sod shed a tear of nostalgia. Funny it is about Irishmen. If you have even a smidgen of the blood of old Brien Boru or The O'Neill or the Cuchulain, come that spring day in March and it starts to bubble and dance. Which makes for big celebrations around the globe - for there are more of us in the States, in Australia, even in Spain and Hong Kong, than still live in the lower counties of the little island shaped like a sheep dog, that clings to Europe but is closest to America.
And like the good dues-paying member I am of the O'Brien Clan (as well as of the McCarthy's, Shea's and O'Neill's) it is happy I get as the day approaches.

I spent a memorable St. Patrick's holiday in Ireland one year. With a couple of friends, I rented a little car and tooled around the countryside, shivering in the B and B's (Bed and Breakfasts) where central heat is unheard of, and marveling at the greens that met our eyes in every vista. The daffodils were dancing beneath soft icy rains and the blustering brawny winds.
We skipped the festivities in Dublin because it would have entailed backtracking on our route around the island and elected instead to participate in the little towns and villages we were passing through.
And celebrate we did.
We started our day atop the Rock of Cashel, a monolith which arises from the green green fields of southern Ireland not too far from Cork. The hill is capped by the ruins of great monasteries and churches as well as dozens of Celtic crosses of moss-encrusted limestone which arise from graves long since worn flat by pilgrim's feet. "'Tis said that it was on this very hill that the Great Kings of Ireland convened to listen to St. Patrick himself explain the concept of the Trinity, how God the Father, the Son and the Holy spirit could be united in one Godhead.
Inspired, the saint grabbed up a shamrock, growing wild there, and showed how its three leafs grew from the same stem to make one.
And the High King and his vassals understood and believed, and Ireland turned from its pagan ways to embrace Christianity.
Turn from its pagan ways? Not altogether, I am thinking, since the Little People, the Leprechauns and the Faeries, still have strong hold on Irish hearts. But that is another story.
The lady in the gift shop - of course there is a gift shop atop the Rock of Cashel, tourists go there don't they?-snipped off a piece of the shamrock vine growing on the counter and pinned it on me.
The shamrock is not like the three-leafed clover that sprang from the turf of our lawn when I was a child. It is more a vine-like plant, with the tri-leaves branching from either side of the long tendril. She sold me some seed to bring home, but I never got it to germinate.
We drove on to Kilkenny with its great cathedral to Saint Canisius (Kil is the Gaelic for church in place names, and Kenny is a corruption of Canisius). There we watched a parade that wound through the little city. Mostly it was made up of school children, in what they must have considered historic dress, carrying banners and blowing their tin whistles.
I don't remember the name of the next little town where we caught up with the parade, but it was much the same. These are traditional throughout Ireland, and somehow, I am thinking, the Lord Mayor of Dublin and his festival committee will not be cancelling them. I doubt they would have a say-so there, at all, at all.
For most workers in Ireland, the day is a holiday which means stores and factories are closed. Not so the pubs. The Irish love these neighborhood gathering places, part watering hole and part restaurant. And on this day they gathered early and we joined with them.
We feasted on pub grub - typical menus but this time augmented with stews and shepherd pies and colcannon, a conglomeration of potatoes and cabbage much favored by the townspeople. And we ate it too. Perhaps, a forerunner of the corned beef and cabbage so dear to the heart of Irish-Americans.

Oh, the music. 'Twas grand. There was an Irish combo that played, as they sat in a booth at the bar. Their table was cluttered with various instruments, which they switched off into as well as tall mugs of the dark ale that wet their whistles.
And their singing! A red haired girl, with green eyes, I swear, just as you would expect, was their lead singer. I think she had a good voice. Most of the time loud choruses from the packed audience downed her out. But occasionally she would venture off into one of those sad sad songs that Celtic music is known for, and a hush would come over the merry-makers, broken only by the slosh of drink in those heavy steins carried by the waiters.
It had been a long day for us. It would be longer tomorrow. We tore ourselves away, to breathe in the fresh night air after all that smoke (the Irish have not heard of no-smoking in eating places) and drove back to shiver in our cozy B and B.
No. Dublin may have cancelled its St. Patrick's Day. But I will wager it will be alive and well in the countryside!

{{{{{{{{{{{Joan}}}}}}}}}}}}}}
What a great article. :-) You make it "glow".... LOL
Jim

...............and there you have it.

MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!..

Here's how it works... If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will post it here... Other members see your request, some being in the near vicinity, are willing to assist, and can email you directly (This protects your privacy) to work out the details. We HIGHLY recommend the "Requester" pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" assistance between members (with the exception of defraying film and postage costs). Do unto others as.... you know :-) Keep us posted on how this is working, so we can share them in the "Fireside"!!
HOST GFS Jim

IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED ANSWER(S) TO YOUR QUESTIONS, PLEASE BE SURE TO LET US KNOW!!!!!
Thanks!! - The Editors

We have had some gracious members offer their assistance in this area. Their screen names and areas they have offered to help in are listed.... Please honor their "goodness" and don't abuse them :-).... We ask that you do follow the guidelines indicated above....

* * * * *

From: Ohrose3809@aol.com

Love the Weekly Fireside!

Question: Is GFS TEG's "A Summer War" scheduled for 4/7/2001 which is Saturday? Have been on vacation, has schedule changed for that one night?

Thank You

{{{{{Ohrose}}}}} No, the schedule hasn't changed, we still "meet" on Thursday nights. We think Jim was working with a 1998 calendar when he made that schedule. In our last planning meeting we changed the schedule some, so be sure to check it out at the end of the newsletter.

* * * * *

Originated by LCFlu@aol.com and passed on by SusiCP:
Hello:
Is anyone related to Hugh Boon born in Washington county, PA in 1834? I am doing a page about the 1st WV Cavalry (http://rootsweb.com/~wvwags/1wvc/1wvc-frm.htm), gradually adding information about each soldier in this regiment. I am interested in a genealogy of Hugh Boon, photos, etc. He received the Medal of Honor and I have that information.
Thanks
Linda

{{Linda}} Hope spreading the request helps. We'll see if this strikes a chord in our membership..... Thanks Susi for passing it on.

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From: SKSPIES@aol.com
I love reading these weekly articles. Unfortunately, my schedule is such that I can no longer join, so I join thru the articles. I am wondering if you can help me identify an article that is owned by a friend? It is a walking stick in a dark wood, a snake carved along its length with a frog (as if the snake is chasing the frog), the words 'Alatoon GA 1864' and other decorations. It was found in a former boarding house in Russelville, KY. I have some pictures I can send you if you'd like. We'd like to know how to research it if not who it belonged to. Thanks for any help you can give us.
- Susan

If there are any "Civil War Artifact" experts out there, drop me an email (HOST GFS Jim) and I'll send you the pictures of this walking stick that Susan sent me. I've never seen anything like it....

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From: Sharonny45@aol.com
Jim, I have an ancestor who died at Gettysburg. I have not been able to find a list that has names of Gettysburg deaths. His name is De Alton Dwight, he was from Illinois (well his parents were there). He was a traveling minister before the war started. Do you have any suggestions? Thanks for all the work you and your team do. Years ago I was a host and it is not easy. Thanks again.

{{{Sharon}} I have learned from HOST GFS TEG that there is a "Gettysburg Role of Honor". He's checking.

A BIT OF COMMUNITY...

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedback's, Items of Interest and Plea's for HELP...

From: SBoard5005@aol.com
Sorry I haven't been in the room lately, I am going to a Community College to learn to become a Veterinary Technician! Needless to say I have had a lot of homework! Maybe I can join you next thursday! Also, we received an email from a girl who saw the info I sent to you about John Hammond in the Fireside. Apparently she has a descendant from the Civil War who also fought in the New York 5th Volunteer Cavalry and is writing a thesis about it. Isn't that cool!

Susan
{{{{{Susan}}}}} We miss you too, but good luck on your studies. We're tickled to death how the material is getting around. :D

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From: DdHober@aol.com
Can you tell me if you know anything more about AndersonCW. His website was removed from Angelfire. He had said that he was unsure of why they had removed it, also he had said he had sent them an email asking about this also. I know his website was a very wonderful research site and he put a great many hours into the site itself. Unfortunately he informed us he had no backup of the site.
Do you know anything more on this, and if there is anything we can do to help?
Thank you
"DdHober" - I have already responded to you, but I thought others might have encountered the same problem. Kevin's (AndersonCW) site is back up and operating. For some reason nobody seems to know (including Angelfire) it just disappeared. The main thing is Kevin is back up and he has backed up everything this round.

http://www.angelfire.com/ga3/ANDERSONVILLE/PRISON.html

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Subj: Re: The Weekly Fireside - 03/11/01
From: IrishInCal@aol.com

Great Newsletter!
I loved the story..and hm my Grandmother was a Shannon...LOL
See you Thurs. Had a meeting this past week, but cannot miss the Irish Brigade!
Thanks Jim..I really enjoy this Newsletter every week.
Grace

{{{{{Grace}}}}} Always good to hear folks are enjoying the Weekly Fireside!!!!

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War", with byproducts of laughter, and comraderie!

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly Fireside."

AND Hey!, TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :)

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We really "fire up" with what members bring to the discussions, and we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif," just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events*****

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Chat Room (On AOL Only) with hosts HOST GFS Amy, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Jim and our many faithful friends :)

03/22/2001 - In honor of St. Patrick's Day The Irish Brigade - part 2 from HOST GFS TEG

03/29/2001 - OPEN CHAT

04/07/01 - "The Devil's To Pay - the Tale of John Buford" Part I- Tom Gladwell (HOST GFS TEG). This is a rather long story so we've split it up into two parts for the Chat Room and the remainder will be put as a series in the Weekly Fireside.

04/12/01 - Letters, Songs and Poems night. Send in any material you want read in the room to HOST GFS Jim, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG or HOST GFS Amy and we'll be more than happy to do the reading for you :D
Note: We'll be featuring a few more of FBenway's poems since we didn't get them all read last month

04/19/01 - OPEN CHAT

04/26/01 - "The Devil's To Pay - the Tale of John Buford" Part II- Tom Gladwell (HOST GFS TEG). This is a rather long story so we've split it up into two parts for the Chat Room and the remainder will be put as a series in the Weekly Fireside.

05/03/01 - OPEN CHAT

05/10/01 - Letters, Songs and Poems night. Send in any material you want read in the room to HOST GFS Jim, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG or HOST GFS Amy and we'll be more than happy to do the reading for you :D

We'll See You Thursday Night..!
Your Joyful, Intelligent and Fun-lovin' Host's & Hostess's :-)
HOST GFS Jim, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Amy

Hear Ye .... Hear Ye
"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 25 March 2001

Our Mission: To serve all genealogists by providing an enjoyable online environment with as many helpful and reliable resources as possible.

This Thursday night we did Part 2 of the Irish Brigade story, the rest of the story is here!! A great time was had by all. Jim was on the road working at his paying job so wasn't able to join us.

Jim, Amy, Tom and I will be getting back together to see if we can "firm up" some of the new projects for our American Civil War History Special Interest Group. We've received some great suggestions and we encourage you to keep sending them in. There are some exciting times ahead for us!!! Don't forget to check in on the Schedule of Upcoming Events. We don't want you missing anything.

I talked to Flo and Frank Benway. They are both doing as well as can be expected under the circumstances. Ben is on some new medications for him and it will be a week before they know how the meds are working. They both asked me to say Hello to everyone and to once again thank you all for the thoughts and prayers. If you'd like to send them greetings be sure to send the mail to FVJEB@aol.com as Frank doesn't go on the computer hardly at all anymore and by sending it to Flo, he'll be sure to get your message.

{{{{{Flo and Ben}}}}} my love and prayers to you both.

Civil War History & Genealogy Forum Related Announcements

War Between the States (Tracing your Civil War Ancestors)
With HOST GFS Amy and HOST GFS Wolford on
Friday evenings at 9:00 PM EDT in the Golden Gates Chat Room
of the Genealogy Forum (ONLY ON AOL) at KEYWORD: ROOTS

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Military Families Chat
With HOST GFS Beri, and HOST GFS Wolford
Wed, 8 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Conference Room
of the Genealogy Forum (ONLY ON AOL) at KEYWORD: ROOTS

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StateGenSites - Bits of Blue and Gray
http://www.stategensites.com/bitsofblueandgray/
HOST GFS Jayne is the editor of "Bits of Blue and Gray"
Watch for an annoucement of the GRAND RE-OPENING
when the site gets moved to it's new "home" The columns will
then be up to date and current
NOTE FROM JAYNE: If you have any Civil War Trivia questions
you would like to "contribute" I would be happy to have them!
BitsOBlueNGray@aol.com

Editor's Note: for those of you who are AOL members, I want to encourage you to feel entirely free to post any Civil War Letters, Stories or articles that you have in our Civil War History Files. There is also an area for you to upload photos, if you would desire to share those with the Civil War History community. Use "Keyword: ROOTS" to get to the Genealogy Main Screen. Then select Files, followed by selecting History and Culture and there you will find the two upload areas I mentioned; Civil War Files and Civil War Photos.

I would also note that the new Genealogy Forum Web Site is being constructed. On that Web Site, the Civil War History SIG will have an area to link to our Civil War Library (Lectures, Letters, Songs, Poems, Files, Firesides, and Photo's). When this is complete, anyone (not just AOL Members) will have access to all our material. We'll be sure to let you know when you can access it.

This coming Thursday is OPEN CHAT. Be sure to bring all those unaswered Civil War questions and we'll try to answer them for you. We'll be watching out for you, and we'll save you a seat by the fire :D

As you'll see, this Weekly Fireside is missing a lot of the "regular" info. I am quite embarrassed and I apologize to HOST GFS TEG and those who attended Thurs night... I never finished the Irish Brigade story!!!! I don't know what happened, I thought I had the entire story formatted to read and apparently I only had half. d:( I just knew something wasn't right, but wasn't sure what... soooooooo, the rest of it is here now. I hope you enjoy

Part 3 - The Irish Brigade

The Antietam Campaign

The Brigade was far from Richmond when Shanley returned. Much occurred during the weeks at Harrison's Landing. General John Pope replaced McClellan, who sat at Harrison's Landing pouting. Lee, no longer threatened by McClellan, concentrated his forces against General Pope's Army of Virginia. On August 28th, Lee crushed Pope on the old Bull Run battlefield and sent him reeling back towards Washington. Lincoln had no choice but to return command of the Army to McClellan.

The Army of the Potomac was on its way back to Washington when Pope was defeated. Two of its Corps, the Third and Fifth, were with Pope at Bull Run. The others were near the capital. The Second Corps left Harrisons Landing during the third week in August and marched unopposed to Newport News, where it embarked for Washington. Arriving at Acquia Creek on August 26, it went into bivouac at Camp California, its starting point before the Peninsula Campaign. On September 3rd the Second Corps moved to Tenallytown, in Maryland north of the capital. On the 5th the Second and Twelfth Corps marched together to Rockville, MD.

While McClellan reorganized his forces around the Washington defenses, on September 5th Lee marched his Army into Maryland. He prayed that a defeat of the Union forces on their own soil would force Lincoln to sue for peace. If not, Lee believed that Great Britian and France would recognize the Confederacy and would force peace between the divided states. Lee advanced to Frederick, Maryland, about forty miles northwest of Washington. Feeling no pressure from McClellan, Lee divided his forces, sending Jackson to attack Harpers Ferry, and moving Longstreet back behind South Mountain, about fifteen miles west of Frederick. Longstreet was sent to Hagerstown while D. H. Hill covered the passes over South Mountain. Lee wrote detailed orders to all his commanders, one of which was never delivered.


The Battle of South Mountain

As Lee marched away from Frederick, McClellan slowly moved in. He was welcomed as a savior by the city. The Army went into camp in the field around Frederick. While McClellan did nothing, Jackson moved on Harpers Ferry and Longstreet set out for Hagerstown and Pennsylvania. Kicking about in an abandoned Confederate camp, a soldier found three cigars wrapped with a letter. The letter contained Lee's detailed orders for his Army.

Armed with Lee's own plans, McClellan ordered an immediate advance down the National Road to South Mountain. He hoped to catch Lee's Army while it was still divided and defeat it in detail before Lee could concentrate or escape. On the evening of September 13th, the First and Ninth Corps reached South Mountain.

McClellan had succeeded. Only one Confederate division, D. H. Hill's guarded the passes over South Mountain. Jackson, with half the Army, and Longstreet, with the remainder, were miles apart. McClellan was closer to each of them than they were to each other. An Aggressive attack would ensure Lee's defeat and the end of the Rebellion.

Learning of his danger, Lee ordered an immediate concentration of his Army. He chose the town of Sharpsburg, Maryland, just north of the Shepherdstown fords over the Potomac, as the place to concentrate. Jackson was ordered to complete his siege of Harpers Ferry and move to Sharpsburg. Longstreet was ordered south from Hagerstown. D.H. Hill was ordered to hold the passes at South Mountain to the last man and delay McClellan's advance.

The battle of South Mountain was fought on September 14th. Hill's men made a valiant stand and held off the First and Ninth Corps all day. By evening, the exhausted Confederates were pushed off the Mountain, and the Second Corps led the Union Army into Boonsboro on the other side. Next morning, September 15. McClellan had the entire Army of the Potomac in Boonsboro and its surroundings. He ordered Richardson's and Sykes divisions forward to Sharpsburg, only seven miles away. Three divisions, including the Irish Brigade, encountered the Confederates posted on the far side of Antietam Creek. The divisions halted at the Boonsboro Pike bridge and deployed to await the arrival of the rest of the Army.

The Army of the Potomac took two days to march the seven miles from Boonsboro to the Battlefield. In the meantime, Jackson forced the surrender of Colonel Miles Union forces of 12,000 at Harpers Ferry and marched more than twenty miles to Sharpsburg. His troops arrived late in the day on the 16th. Longstreet's also arrived on the 16th, marching just under twenty miles. McClellan's failure to attack the Army of Northern Virginia on September 15th or 16th lost the nation its best chance to end the Rebellion. The hundreds of thousands of dead and injured soldiers suffered during the balance of the Civil War are directly attributable to McClellan's inaction on those days.

The Battle of Antietam

On the morning of September 17th, McClellan was finally ready to attack. The battle opened at dawn when General Hooker sent his First Corps against the left of the Confederate line. The First Corps went in alone. The Twelfth Corps under Mansfield was on the field, but was not ordered into the attack by headquarters. Hooker's division fought gallantly, placing the names of The Cornfield and The Dunker Church forever into American military history. Only after his forces were exhausted, and Hooker himself was wounded, did Mansfield lead the Twelfth forward. The Twelfth Corps in turn fought an unsupported battle, suffering terrible losses before retreating back to the East Woods and the Cornfield. Mansfield was mortally wounded during the attack. The First and Twelfth Corps were out of the fight.

The Second Corps turn had come. Sumner commanded three divisions, led by Sedgwick, French and Richardson. The battle was more than an hour old when at 7:30 a.m. Sumner ordered the Second Corps to Hooker's and Mansfield's support. Richardson's division, which guarded McClellan's headquarters at the Pry House, was ordered to await the arrival of a replacement division from the Fifth Corps.

Sumner led Sedgwick's and French's divisions to the Pry House ford across the Antietam Creek. On the far side, he met General Hooker being carried off the field. Hooker made an urgent call for help. Without waiting for French, Sumner ordered Sedgwick to form his powerful division into line of battle on a brigade front. As soon as the division was formed, Sumner led it across the field. The three brigades of the division passed across no man's land, between the front lines of the Union First and Twelfth Corps and the Confederates. The Confederates let them pass unopposed into the West Woods beyond the Dunker Church. Then they counterattacked into Sedgwick's flank and rear, crushing his attack and sending his division running to the First Corp's positions on the north of the battlefield. By 9 a.m. Sedgwick was out of the fight.

French's division finished crossing the Antietam while this attack took place. French, separated from Sedgwick and out of touch with him, led his men to the left towards the Roulette farm. He was attracted to this site by the Confederates firing at Sedgwick. He attacked the farm, drove the Confederates from it and pushed them up the rise behind towards a sunken road.

Bloody Lane

The sunken road is a country lane running generally west to east and stretching between the Hagerstown and Boonsboro Pikes. It sits on a rise above the Roulette farm. Over the years, the road has been worn down by farmers' traffic and is from three to five feet below ground level. The road is bordered by snake rail fences, forming a perfect trench from which to fight. For much of its length, the road is set back some distance from the crest of the rise so that the men standing in the road could see into the ground around the Roulette's and stretching north. Behind the road, the land rises gently towards an orchard and fields in which Confederate artillery was posted.

The road was occupied by North Carolina troops on the left and Alabama troops on the right, all from D. H. Hill's division. These men fought at South Mountain and were still recovering from their severe losses. They looked with frightened admiration at French's division, with Weber's brigade in front, as it moved on their position. Behind Weber's brigade were two others, Morris and Kimball. Weber moved with great precision past Roulett's and up the slope towards the road.

As the first brigade crested the rise, the North Carolinians rose up from the road and fired a volley from a distance of sixty feet. The volley wrecked the brigade. Weber was down, every color was down, and the brigade reeled back behind the crest. Morris's brigade coming forward swept up the remnants of Weber's and pressed on. The Confederates had time to reload. Again they fired a devastating volley at point blank range into the Union forces. Again those forces staggered back.

Kimball's brigade coming up had seen the effects of the Confederates fire on the two leading brigades. Much more cautiously, they moved to engage the North Carolinians. Both sides settled into a firefight, the Confederates behind the cover of the road and the Union men behind the cover of the crest. As each man loaded, he rose up over cover to fire at his enemy. Although the Confederates had the better position, French's greater numbers began to tell and the casualties in the North Carolina troops climbed steadily. Sensing the danger, Hill reinforced the road with more troops. French's fight was well underway when Richardson's division was at last sent forward. Leaving the Pry House at 9:30 a.m., the Irish Brigade led the division across the Antietam at Pry ford. The sound of French's battle was overwhelming, and Meagher immediately led the Brigade towards the fight. The Irishman rushed ahead of Richardson's other two brigades, commanded by Caldwell and Brooke.

The Irish Brigade, with the 69th in front followed by the 28th Massachusetts, the 63rd and 88th, marched at the double quick in column of fours up to the Roulette Farm lane. Richardson cheered them as they advanced, shouting, " Bravo 88th, I shall never forget you!" Captain Joyce, seriously ill with camp fever, joined in the cheer for General Richardson. Joyce could not remain sick in camp while Company C went into battle.

The farm lane was covered with stragglers from French's division. Meagher halted the Brigade and ordered it into line of battle in the fields to the left and behind French's men. Confederate skirmishers on the east side of the sunken road moved to the crest of the rise and fired on the Brigade. Their fire, along with artillery fire from beyond the road, was telling on the Irish. A picket fence ran between two fields across the Brigades front. If left in place, it would break up the Brigade's formation as it advanced. Meagher halted the Brigade in its battle line and called for volunteers to tear down the fence. Seventy-five men, mainly from the 28th and armed with rifles, went forward to do the deed. The Confederates concentrated their fire on these men. The fence went down, but less than twenty five men returned to the ranks.

Father's Corby and Ouellet rode up and down the Brigades front, granting absolution to the men in the ranks. The Irishmen were unsupported, neither Caldwell nor Brooke was up yet. But French's position was desperate. Meagher Rose in his stirrups and shouted, "Irish Brigade, Raise the Colors and Follow Me!" The Brigade moved forward over the three hundred yards separating it from the sunken road.

The chaplains dismounted and with the Brigades musicians followed behind, ready to care for the wounded. As the Brigade advanced, the enemy skirmishers on the top of the rise continued to take their toll. One of those injured during this advance may have been Private McArdle. A bullet tore through his leg and knocked him down. Fortunately no bones were broken, but he was out of the battle none the less. He was helped back towards the large haystack that the Surgeons set up as the Brigade hospital.

The Brigade swept on as the enemy skirmishers fell back to the sunken road. Alerting their comrades, hundreds of Confederates prepared for the appearance of the Brigade over the rise. A great roar could be heard from below the crest. The Brigade had begun its Gaelic battle cry "Faugh a Ballagh!'' "Clear the Way!" The colors began to emerge over the rise. First the finials and streamers, then the flags themselves, emerald green and red, white and blue. Then the men appeared, in battle line as if on parade. The Alabamans rose up, leveled muskets and fired.

The Irishman saw only the flash and smoke. Death struck the front lines. Every color bearer went down, most with multiple wounds. As much as a third of the Brigade fell at that first volley. Amid the Irishmen's confusion the command of the surviving officers rang out, "Irish Brigade, Ready, Aim, FIRE!" The Confederates, waiting for the Irish Brigade to break as had all of French's brigades, were caught in the return volley. Now Meagher's insistence on arming the Brigade with smoothbore muskets bore fruit. The Irishmen fired buck and ball rounds into the Confederates that acted like shotgun blast. Dozens of the enemy fell to the Irishmen's fire.

Even more shocking to the Confederates, the Irishmen stood their ground. Standing, kneeling, laying prone, they kept up a tremendous fire into the enemy. Their position on top of the rise gave them a slight height advantage. They could fire directly into the enemy's lines and up and down the sunken road. But the contest went both ways. As each color bearer was shot down, another rose to take his place. Eight men fell carrying the 69th colors. At one point, Captain McGee of the 69th picked up the green color. The flagstaff was immediately cut in two by a rebel bullet. McGee bent down to pick up the color and a bullet snatched off his cap. He wrapped the color around his body and turned again to the fight.

Meagher rode up and down the lines, shouting encouragement to his men. Forty minutes went by as the Brigade fought the battle alone. Captain Clooney with the 88th Company E urged his men to aim low. His voice carried clearly to the regiment, over the noise of battle. Suddenly, a rebel bullet smashed his knee. Clooney fell, then struggled back up, using his sword as a crutch. His men urged him to go to the rear. In agony, he continued to shout encouragement to his men. Then another Confederate ball hit him passing through his body. Clooney fell dead, shocking the brave men in his regiment who thought him under special Papal protection. He lay still, the green plume in his hat blowing gently in the breeze.

By now, ammunition was running low. Muskets fouled by black powder could no longer be loaded. Officers and sergeants were down. The privates fought on. There was nothing fancy about this fight, it was a simple, bloody brawl.

The Confederates were faring no better. French's brigades at first contact falling back and engaging in a long range fight. The Irish were different they fought at close range. The Confederate officers and sergeants working outside the cover of the road suffered terribly. The Irish wounded Colonel Gordon, One rebel died kneeling, a fresh cartridge still in his teeth. A mortally wounded old private cradled the body of a young sergeant in his arms. It was his son, and the older soldier was waiting to join him in death. The fight was too much for the Alabamans to bear. In their twos and threes, as they ran out of ammunition, the Confederates began to run back from the sunken road to the corn field.

Caldwell and Brooke moved cautiously onto the field. Caldwell led his regiments to the left of the Irish but remained under the cover of the rise. Brooke lined his brigade three hundred yards behind the Irish on the reverse slope of a rise. There they stayed in perfect safety while the Irishmen's number dwindled.

Caldwell left his men without orders and hid behind a haystack. Seeing this Meagher rode up to Colonel Francis Barlow, commanding the rightmost regiment. " For God's sake, Barlow, come up and help!" But Barlow refused Meagher, pleading he had no orders. Brave on every other occasion, Barlow would rise to be a major general and command a division. But from that day forward, the Irish Brigade despised him.

Finally, General Richardson arrived on the field. Seeing the Irish in desperate shape and Caldwell's brigades not moving, he ran up to Barlow. Caldwell was nowhere to be found. Cursing loudly, Richardson ordered the brigade to go to the relief of the Irish. Barlow took command and led the way into position behind the Irish Brigade.

The Brigade's fight was almost an hour old when Meagher alerted it that relief was at hand. He ordered each regiment to form up. Under intense fire the Irish Brigade and Caldwell's brigade performed a parade ground maneuver, a break of companies to the front and rear. In turn, from right to left, each Irish Brigade company stood to attention and executed a wheel out of line. One of Caldwell's companies marched forward to replace it. After the terrible casualties the Irish suffered, this act was one of the most extraordinary feats in the Civil War. It showed that the discipline of the Irish Brigade was still perfect, and the leadership of its officers and NCOs is awe inspiring.

Sadly for the Irish, one slight delay in the movement cost them dearly. As the Sixty-third slowly moved out of line, the Eighty-eight's rightmost companies stood up. The Confederates poured a last volley into Companies C and D. Many fell, including Captain Joyce, killed by this parting shot.

As Caldwell's troops moved to the crest, they stepped over a human bulwark of five hundred dead and wounded. Among the dead was Captain Felix Duffy, the irascible commander of Company G, Sixty-ninth New York. His first battle was in Mexico and his last in the rolling farmland of Maryland. Lieutenant John Conway, commanding Company K, Sixty-ninth lay dead with more than a dozen of his men. Captain Patrick Clooney of the Eighty-eight's Company E , shot twice and lying dead with the men who carried the flags. His special Papal blessing could not shield him on this day. Captain John O'Connell Joyce of the Eighty-eight lay there killed as he was preparing his company to withdraw. Captain Kavanagh of the Sixty-third, Fenian and young Irelander, now dead before the sunken road. Captain Shanley, just returned after recovering from his Malvern Hill wound, lay wounded with a rifle ball in his shoulder.

Barlow's Sixty-first and Sixty-fourth New York Regiments took up the Irishmen's fight. By now the Confederates had suffered enough. They fired cartridge box loads into the Irish, only to see them march off the field with incredible arrogance. Now fresh troops moved into the attack. It was too much. The Alabama troops broke and ran up the rise behind the road.

Barlow wheeled the regiments into the road and began firing down its length. The whole Confederate position collapsed, and Kimball led the remnants of French's divisions into the road beside Barlow. They followed close behind the Confederates, but halted to repulse a counterattack from the direction of Mumma's Farm, west of the sunken road. General Richardson personally led a battery forward to fire on the retreating Confederates. As he directed its fire, a rebel shell exploded above him, inflicting a mortal wound.

What a sight greeted the Union men! The road was carpeted with hundreds of Confederate dead and wounded. In spots the rebel bodies were piled two and three deep. The Brigade gave as good as it got. The sunken road would be known forever as The Bloody Lane.

McClellan's Final Blunder

General McClellan, standing on a hill south of the Boonsboro Pike, watched the Confederates streaming from the sunken road. He slapped his hands together, '' It is the most beautiful field I ever saw and the grandest Battle!" Franklin's Sixth Corps with 20,000 men was standing ready to engage in the East Woods, less than a mile from the sunken road. Porter's Fifth Corps with another 20,000 was guarding headquarters at the Pry House, a mile and a half from the battle. General Richardson, the only senior officer who knew there was nothing in front but weak batteries and disorganized infantry, was dying. McClellan was out of touch with the battle. He did not order the reserves forward.

Then from the creek, a brigade is seen moving to the Union troops support. Green flags carried high, the Irish brigade was returning to the battlefield. Cartridge boxes full again, Meagher led his men back to the fight. The Irish Brigade was not finished yet! Meagher was enraged at his loses and meant to renew the battle just what the Union needed! As they approached the sunken road, a Confederate sharpshooter aiming at Meagher killed his beautiful bay horse. Meagher was thrown from the saddle and stunned by the fall. He was led away to the Brigade hospital. The spark was gone. Lt. Colonel Kelly of the Sixty-ninth led the brigade into the sunken road where it halted. The battle of the sunken road was over.

The Aftermath of Battle

Turning to its own casualties, the Brigade began the sad process of removing the wounded and burying the dead. More than one hundred lay dead on the rise. Over four hundred wounded were moved back to the Brigade's haystack hospital. Father's Corby and Ouellet moved side by side, administering last rites and hearing last confessions. The musicians carried the wounded to the hospital, while the soldiers buried the dead.

Most of the dead privates and non-coms were buried in groups, with as many as ten men in each grave. The locations were noted, but the names of those buried were rarely kept. Years later, most of the men buried in these graves were moved to the National Cemetery at Sharpsburg. But not all soldiers were so lucky. Recently three skeletons were unearthed from a common grave in the fields over which the Irish Brigade advanced. They were identified as Brigade dead by their location, their New York state coat buttons and the Catholic medals they carried. Forensic scientist found three minie balls in the rib cage of one of these men. Another was shot through the skull.

Officer dead were treated with more respect. They were given individual graves with simple wooden markers, so that anyone coming later would know who was there. Over the next several weeks family members of the dead officers came to recover the remains. Captains Duffy, Kavanagh, Clooney and Joyce, and Lieutenant Conway's famlies removed their loved one's bodies and returned with them to New York. Each was re-interred in Calvary Cemetery. Captain Duffy's remains were moved once more to their current resting place with its beautiful marker. The others graves have remained unmarked since 1862.

The Irish brigade faced many more ordeals: Fredricksburg, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Cold Harbor and Petersburg were in the future. But in the Army of the Potomac at Antietam, only the men of the Irish Brigade held their position until their ammunition was gone, only they retired under orders, only they left the field in military formation, and only they returned to the battlefield to fight again.


The Irish Brigade Association

The Irish Brigade Association of which I am a member, Some years ago began an annual Memorial Day ceremony honoring a famous Irish American who died during the Civil War. We have honored men such as Michael Corcoran, Michael Doheny, James Haggerty, James Rorty and Richard Byrnes. According to veterans laws, each documented veteran of any of America's wars are entitled to a grave marker provided by the government. We can request these markers for any soldier whose grave was unmarked.

Most of the Irishmen killed in the Civil War rest in unmarked graves. The vast majority are buried on the battlefields ( what better argument for preservation!), but even those returned home are mostly left unmarked. When we learn the life histories of these men and read the pension records of their loved ones, we find that most were poor and their families could not afford the cost of the headstones. By the time the government markers became available, their close relatives had died and there was no one left to request the stones.

We have taken on a lifetime's task. We in the Irish Brigade Association and the 69th New York Historical Association will continue to honor these Irishmen. They are not forgotten..

May they all rest in peace, reunited with their families in God's great Glory

Faugh a Ballagh !
Tom

ED NOTE: You may read the WHOLE story at: http://www.genealogyforum.rootsweb.com/gfnews/spot/civilwar/Irish.htm

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War", with byproducts of laughter, and comraderie!

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly Fireside."

AND Hey!, TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :)

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We really "fire up" with what members bring to the discussions, and we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif," just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events*****

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Chat Room (On AOL Only) with hosts HOST GFS Amy, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Jim and our many faithful friends :)

03/29/2001 - OPEN CHAT

04/07/01 - "The Devil's To Pay - the Tale of John Buford" Part I- Tom Gladwell (HOST GFS TEG). This is a rather long story so we've split it up into two parts for the Chat Room and the remainder will be put as a series in the Weekly Fireside.

04/12/01 - Letters, Songs and Poems night. Send in any material you want read in the room to HOST GFS Jim, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG or HOST GFS Amy and we'll be more than happy to do the reading for you :D
Note: We'll be featuring a few more of FBenway's poems since we didn't get them all read last month

04/19/01 - OPEN CHAT

04/26/01 - "The Devil's To Pay - the Tale of John Buford" Part II- Tom Gladwell (HOST GFS TEG). This is a rather long story so we've split it up into two parts for the Chat Room and the remainder will be put as a series in the Weekly Fireside.

05/03/01 - OPEN CHAT

05/10/01 - Letters, Songs and Poems night. Send in any material you want read in the room to HOST GFS Jim, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG or HOST GFS Amy and we'll be more than happy to do the reading for you :D

We'll See You Thursday Night..!
Your Joyful, Intelligent and Fun-lovin' Host's & Hostess's :-)
HOST GFS Jim, HOST GFS Jayne, HOST GFS TEG and HOST GFS Amy

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