March 2000 Weekly Firesides

Hear Ye .... Hear Ye 

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group; 
Distribution Coast to Coast 
Week ending 05 March 2000

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Mission Statement: To serve all genealogists by providing an enjoyable 
online environment with as many helpful and reliable resources as possible. 
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The Fireside Story Thursday was fun. It was the story "Old Beeswax", more 
commonly known as Raphael Semmes and his exploits in the Confederate Navy. It 
should be posted in the History Lectures Library in about a week for your access if 
you weren't able to make the SIG. 

Music: Well, as is my "want" on occasion I have tried out an artist I had never 
heard before and I "LIKED" it... Heh Heh The artist is Sean Harkness, his 
instruments are steel string and acoustic nylon guitars. Incredibly pleasing music for 
a Sunday evening or around sunset on any old day when you get home from work, 
the kids are fed, the dishes are washed and you just want to wind down. This 
particular CD is titled "Aloft". A sample listing of the songs on the CD are "Siempre 
Conmigo" (Always With Me), "Summer Solstice", "Aloft", "Paradise Road", 
"Cuchullain's Dream", "Coming Home", "Green Mountain Trail", and "Harlem River 
Drive". ............Enjoy!! 
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Editor's Note: for those of you who are AOL members, I want to encourage you to 
feel entirely free to post any Civil War Letters, or Stories or articles that you have in 
our Civil War History Files. There is also an area for you to upload photos, if you 
would desire to share those with the Civil War History community. Use 
"keyword=roots" to get to the Genealogy Main Screen. Then select Files, followed 
by selecting History and Culture and there you will find the two upload areas I 
mentioned; Civil War Files, and Civil War Photos. I would also note that the New 
Genealogy Forum Web Site is being constructed. On that Web Site, the Civil War 
History SIG will have an area to link to our Civil War Library (Lectures, Letters, 
Songs, Poems, Files, Firesides, and Photo's). When this is complete then anyone 
(not just AOL Members) will have access to all our material. We'll be sure to let you 
know when you can access it. 

This coming Thursday is "Letters, Songs and Poems" of the Civil War Era. If you 
have some to share don't forget to send them in to GFS Jayne, GFS TEG, GFH 
Amy or myself and we'll sure "read" them.
We'll keep a light on for you ....*<>*
"************************************************************************ 
FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WE REALLY WELCOME YOU TO 
OUR MERRY BAND" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU, TRADING QUESTIONS AND 
COMMENTS AND ESPECIALLY YOUR CAMARADERIE!!! :-)... COME AGAIN 
OFTEN, WE DO INDEED "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY.. 

Every first-timer to the American Civil War History SIG gets put on the newsletter 
distribution automatically, because we like to send you a "Thank You Card" for 
coming to visit and this is our way of doing so. We hope to give you an opportunity 
to jump right in with us. If you desire NOT to receive the newsletter, then just drop us 
an email saying UNSUBSCRIBE and we will quickly remove your screen name from 
distribution. We certainly don't want to clog your mailbox with unwanted material. 
Also many of you pass on the newsletter to others that don't subscribe to AOL. We 
really want to thank you for spreading the word. I would also like to let you know that 
we would be happy to add them to our list if they have email of any sort. We 
distribute everywhere to those that have requested it. AOL membership is not a 
requirement although we'd love to see you in the Chat Room:D 
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THE HELP DESK 
This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday 
night that we didn't have a chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check 
it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots," 
after which will bring you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the 
"Files Library Center," then "History Files". At that point select "Civil War Files." 
Lectures and the Letters, Songs and Poems evenings are also posted in the "Files 
Library Center" under "History Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" 
when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the New Files section are 
posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting Logs and Newsletters". 
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WEBSITES WE'VE RECEIVED.......

from: AJWRJW 
97th Pennsylvania Infantry, Company A Roster 
http://www.users.fast.net/~modolfan/compa.html  

from: IrishInCal 
12th Cavalry Rolls 
http://geocities.com/Athens/Agora/2769/12mr.html  

from GFS Taz 
They are all pretty good civil war sites.... 
http://www.civilwararchive.com/files.htm  
http://www.public.usit.net/mruddy/clayton2.htm  
http://www.usigs.org/library/military/index.htm  

from: MRB1330 
The Civil War Talk Directory 
http://www.coolboard.com/myboards.cfm?oid=676814113099021  
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And The Band Played On - An Announcement 
(Note: I'll keep this up through March)

July 2000 National Civil War Band Festival 
The American Civil War Institute of Campbellsville University and the Campbellsville University 
School of Music announced today the launching of the "greatest and most significant gathering of 
Civil War bands in the nation since 1865" with the University's sponsorship of The National 
Civil War Band Festival, July 28-30, 2000. 
The three-day music festival will be held on the campus of Campbellsville University, which is 
located in south central Kentucky (82 miles southwest of Lexington; 90 miles southeast of 
Louisville; and 150 miles northeast of Nashville). 

Organizers of the event said that they are estimating The National Civil War Band Festival to 
attract between 10,000 to 25,000 people to the City of Campbellsville. 

Host bands for the festival are the Saxton's Cornet Band, based in Lexington, Kentucky, and 
the Old Towne Brass, based in Huntsville, Alabama. Bands wishing to participate or seeking 
further information may contact either Nicky Hughes at Soyuz11@aol.com or Bob Baccus at 
wrbaccus@hiwaay.net. 

For more information concerning the festival, contact Marc C. Whitt at 270-789-5211--office 
or at whittm@campbellsvil.edu, or Dr. David McCullough, director of bands at Campbellsville 
University, at 270-789-5058--office or at mcdavid@campbellsvil.edu. 

Marc C. Whitt 
Vice President for Advancement 
Campbellsville University 
1 University Drive 
Campbellsville, Kentucky 42718-2799 
(270) 789-5211-office phone 
(270) 789-5095-office fax 

"Ted" thanks for this neat tip. It sounds like a "once in a lifetime" event..... If any of 
you Readers are interested in this, Ted has provided all the "contact" information to 
get "your dibs" in early. I would suspect this will fill up in a hurry and this is a "first 
time" gathering of this nature.... :-) I'm going to leave this up a bit so everyone can 
mark their calendars and make arrangements if they're interested. 
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From: GFS Jayne 
March 17; Maryland = Songs of the Civil War 
"In Thinking of America" songs of the Civil War featuring Robert Trentham, 8 p.m., 
Westminster High School, Westminster. Reception 6 p.m. at Carroll County Career and 
Technology Center next door. Civil War attire, no firearms, encouraged. Adult $10 advance, 
$12.50 at the door. Students $5 advance, $7.50 at the door. 
For more information, contact: 
Carroll County Community Concert Association, P.O. Box 1680, Westminster, MD 21158-
8680, (410) 857-7200 , (410) 876-8249. 

{{{Jayne}}} - thanks for sending this one. For the readers; Robert was a guest in our 
SIG two years ago, when he published his Civil War CD "Epitaph" in honor of his 
Civil War ancestors. Soooo, Jayne if you happen to attend, you give him a big hug 
from all of us. Heh Heh Annnnd leave your musket at HOME ..... 
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From: SusiCP 
I received this message on the Arkansas Genealogy Society list today. I 
thought it was pertinent to all of us. 
The National Archives will be increasing the price of 
Military Service Records from $10 to $17.50 
Pension Records (Rev. War, Civil War, etc.) from $10 to $40 
Effective July 1, 2000 
I was told this information by a staff member of the National Archives 
this last Saturday in Washington, DC. You might want to get any orders in 
before the increase. 

{{Susi}} thanks for the tip.. 
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From: SusiCP 
Saw this in the Sidney Ohio newspaper and thought it worth mentioning. 
Sorry it is so long but please read it in its entirety: 

Ohio's only Civil War battlefield (and only one of three on Northern soil) is 
about to be destroyed at the hands of a sand and gravel company. Buffington 
Island Battlefield is largely owned by the Shelley Materials of Thornville, Ohio, and company 
has filed and received permits to operate a gravel pit on the battlefield because Ohio has no 
historic preservation laws. The battle saved the North from further invasions when 8000 Union 
soldiers stopped 2200 Confederate raiders after doing huge damage across Ohio. It is the only 
battlefield where two future presidents - Hayes & McKinley -- 
participated. Between 54 and 105 US soldiers are buried in an unmarked, unlocated grave on 
the battlefield. Despite the fact that technology exists to locate these veterans, neither the gravel 
company nor the state of Ohio will do so. Currently, Ohio law does not recognize human 
remains after 125 years of burial, so these soliders do not count in the eyes of the state. If more 
info is needed contact John Rawdon, 3471 Ellen Drive, Akron, Ohio or Margaret Parker, 
president, Meigs County Pioneer & Historical Society, 
PO Box 145, Pomeroy, Ohio 45769. 
Email addresses: 
meigscountyhistoricalsociety@dragonbbs.com 
kdashley2@hotmail.com (Keith Ashley) 

Please visit the petition to save the battlefield at 
http://www.petitiononline.com/Buff/petition.html. 

Also visit the Saving Buffington island Web Site at 
http://www.geocities.com/buffington_isle/.

{{Susi}} Thanks 
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MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!..

Here's how it works.. If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or battlefield, 
to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and 
we will post it here... Other members seeing your request and being in the near 
vicinity, and are willing to assist can email you direct (this protects your privacy) and 
work out the details. We HIGHLY recommend the "Requester" pay for all film costs 
and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" 
assistance between members (with the exception of defraying film and postage costs). 
Do unto others as.... you know :-) Keep us posted on how this is working, so we can 
share them in the "Fireside"!! 
GFS Jim
IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED ANSWER(S) TO YOUR QUESTIONS, PLEASE BE SURE TO 
LET US KNOW!!!!! 
Thanks!! - The Editors

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We have had some gracious members offer their assistance in this area. Their screen 
names and areas they have offered to help in are listed.... Please honor their 
"goodness" and don't abuse them :-).... We ask that you do follow the guidelines 
indicated above.... 

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From: CW1865 
My gr gr grandfather, Pvt. Adam Schneider, 183rd Ohio Infantry, died on the Sultana on April 
17, 1865, while coming home from Confederate prison with over 2,000 other parolees. Shortly 
after, his family in Cincinnati was visited by a survivor of this disaster who was also his friend, 
Pvt. Michael Conrad, and Conrad told my gr gr grandmother what happened to her husband. I 
am looking for descendants of Conrad in the hopes that they can tell us Michael's version so 
what happened the night the Sultana went down. 
Thanks so much! 
Pam Newhouse 

{{{Pam}}} - check out the websites in last week's Fireside 

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From: LYoung144 
Can you tell me where to find a list of the men who rode with Quantrill? I would appreciate it 
very much. 
Lorita 

{{Lorita}} - my first answer is the Missouri State Archives, Civil War Section. I have 
also seen that list (unofficial I'm sure) in one or two books I've read. Now I just have 
to remember what books those were. In the mean time I'll put this in the newsletter 
and see if any of the readers knows. PLease email Lorita direct and copy me (GFS 
Jim) 
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From: JCHovermal 

Could anyone help me with this one? My great grandfather James A. Furman Truett was 
enlisted into the 14th SC Infantry in Aug.1861 in a town called Lightwood Knot Springs. Does 
anyone know where that was? 

Susan Truett Hovermale 
Mt. Pleasant,SC 

{{{{Susan}}}} Here's hoping some one of the Civil War History "Faithful" can help. 
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From: hood@rica.net (Jan Hood) and passed to us from SusiCP 
SIMON POLK enlisted in the Confederate Army on 16 April 1862 at Rudes Hill, New 
Market, VA. He went in as a Private. He was assigned to the 2nd VA Infantry, 
Company F, Winchester Rifles. This Company and Infantry rode with Stonewall 
Jackson throughout the war and was part of "Stonewall's Brigade." SIMON POLK 
was listed as 'sick' in September 1862, and in a hospital at Bunker Hill, West 
Va. He was later moved to a hospital in Martinsburg, W. Va., where he died on 
11 October 1862. The hospital is not named. 
I would appreciate anyone who may be able to help me, with any lookup or 
advice. 
Thank you VERY much. 
Jan in Shenandoah Co., Va. 

"Jan" - we're glad your "plea" was passed on to us. We'll put this to the membership 
who many dedicated and expert researchers in all aspects of the Civil War and see 
what we can find..... :-) Hey Faithful!.... What say Ye?? 
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A BIT OF COMMUNITY... 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, 
Feedback's, Items of Interest and Plea's for HELP...

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From: RCorey1998 
Last week's "Fireside" was very interesting. Thanks for sharing it. 
Ruth 

{{Ruth}} Thanks for the feedback 
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From: GLITZ01 
I know what the DAR is, but exactly what is their function? Do they do research? I hear of them 
all the time and I know I have the possibilities of joining, but I don't really know what they stand 
for. Is there a place I can read on it. 
thanks Shirley 

{{Shirley}} I had already sent you a response but then I thought: "Self, there are a ton 
of DAR members and some officers that hit the forum. Why not ask them as well?" So 
I'll do that :-) All you DAR members send Shirley a note :D 

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From: Jowhara7 
Hi Jim - I know this has nothing to do with the Civil War era, but I thought is was interesting 
enough to send to all my genie friends. See ya Thurs. 
Jacque 

"I think it is helpful in genealogy to know about a severe epidemic. It might 
explain to us why several people in a family died about the same time. This is 
something that I came across that I thought might be helpful in our local NC 
newspaper." 

THE MOST DEADLY FLU 
by Frank Tursi 
Winston-Salem Journal 
Feb. 20, 2000 

By mid-October, Dr. D.C. Speas of Bethania had learned to read the deadly signs. 
His patients' faces turned a dark brownish-purple. They started to cough up 
blood, and their feet turned black. Though he continued to prescribe aspirin to 
try to control the high fever and "dover's powder," Speas knew that it was 
hopeless. 
The end would come with his patients frantically gasping for breath. They 
drowned in the fluid that filled their lungs. The only doctor between 
Winston-Salem and Tobaccoville during that fateful October in 1918, Speas signed 
four death certificates in one day, dozens during the dreadful month. 
What was killing Speas' patients wasn't some exotic disease or a pestilence from 
the Dark Ages. It was the flu. A particularly virulent strain---uncontrolled 
by vaccines or antibiotics, which were then unknown---swept like a firestorm 
across the US in the fall of 1918 and then went on to consume the rest of the 
world. By the time it played itself out a year later, the flu had killed an 
estimated 25 million people, making it the worst pandemic in recorded history. 
Most died in eight weeks. As a comparison, World War I, which was then raging 
in Europe, would claim 9.2 million battle deaths in four years of fighting. 
In America, 25 percent of the population was infected and almost 700,000 people 
died. Whole Eskimo villages in Alaska were wiped out. That October, the 
deadliest month in the nation's history, almost 200,000 Americans---delirious 
with fever and struggling for breath---died, their bodies stacked up at funeral 
homes and hospitals because there weren't enough coffins to go around. 
Though called the Spanish flu, the plague actually started innocently at an army 
base in Kansas, where thousands of soldiers became sick in March 1918. They all 
recovered within a few days. It was this mild form of the disease that traveled 
to Europe that spring with American troops heading off to war. Soldiers on the 
Western Front fought off the flu throughout the early summer. But it was in the 
mud and grime of the trenches, where thousands of men lived in close contact, 
that the virus mutated into the deadly form that re-crossed the Atlantic in 
July. Some have since speculated that the mustard gas then used to bombard the 
troops and now known to cause genetic mutations triggered the change. 
People first started dying in the port cities of the East Coast---Boston, New 
York and Philadelphia and then Norfolk, VA and Wilmington, NC. The beginning of 
30 days of lung-congested, feverish terror began Oct. 1, when Boston reported 
that 202 people had died of flu and pneumonia. State health officials advised 
cities to close schools, churches and other buildings where people gathered in 
great numbers. Fresh air became a fetish. Streetcars kept the windows open, 
and the sick often were placed on the porch to sleep. Residents were warned to 
avoid crowds and handshakes. If couples had to kiss, they were told to do so 
through a handkerchief. Gauze masks were common pieces of apparel. 
The epidemic crested locally Oct. 19, when 1,293 cases were reported in 
Winston-Salem in 24 hours. The number of new cases and deaths gradually 
declined. Though sporadic outbursts would continue through the spring of 1919, 
the pestilence had moved on. But not without leaving its mark: 13,644 North 
Carolinians had died, 210 in this county---the highest death toll in the state. 

It is not related to the above, but when the white man first came to America, 
there was a severe problem. He brought diseases to the Indians that they had 
never been exposed to, and it almost wiped them out. In return, the Indians 
gave the white man syphilis. It was never in Europe until Columbus and his crew 
returned, and then it spread throughout, killing thousands. Everyone knows 
about "smallpox" but few know that it was called "small" because it was nothing 
compared to the real "pox," which was the name for syphilis. "A pox upon you!" 
in Shakespeare's writings meant "I hope you get syphilis!" After a few 
generations, humans were able to overcome the deadly effects. Although still 
very serious, few die from this terrible disease any more. 
Few young people are aware that dermatologists a few years ago were called 
"dermatologists and syphilogists" as syphilis was their main concern. The 
symptoms imitated many other diseases. During the draft for WW II, the large 
number of men infected with syphilis was astounding. Treatment was started for 
them and their loved ones. Health departments in just about every county set up 
syphilis treatment stations. People had to come in and lie down on a cot, and 
have bismuth and arsenic dripped slowly into their veins with an IV. It took 
weeks of this treatment before the person could be released. Although syphilis 
is still very much with us, now treatment is simply a shot or two of Bicillin, a 
type of penicillin. 
I can remember as a child that I could not go swimming or mixing with strange 
kids, due to the polio epidemic. That was pretty dreadful also, until the 
vaccine was developed. It would be good to get the dates for the past epidemics 
across the country, to help us in our genealogy. 
John Wayland 

{{Jacque}} Great article - thanks for sharing.... 
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From: TUBES14 
I'll leave this up for awhile. 

SAVING BUFFINGTON ISLAND 
Hello, My name is John , and Im a 30 year + resident of Ohio. This email 
is in regards to Buffington Island, Ohio. 
Buffington Island is Ohio's only civil war battlefield, and it is in 
grave danger of being destroyed. A gravel company owns 500 
acres of the battlefield, in which some of the heaviest fighting of the 
day was done. 60+ men , from both sides are said to be 
buried there, no markers were ever set for them and only a handful of 
the men are named. 
I have worked for over a year to prepare a report to distribute to the 
people on this battlefield and the men involved. Included in 
the report are online links to rosters for as many units as I could find 
. Im hoping that someone may find a relative that may be 
buried at Buffington Island. Until a bit ago, I could only email out the 
report, which is 2.5 megs (78 pages). I have been graced by 
a friend with the same feelings for this subject as I do.He has put my 
report together on a website, which , I can only say was a God send. 
I invite you to visit our website, it has all the same links and 
articles as my report. It will explain the battle, the commanders, where 
its situated, and of course the links to the units involved. 
There is a petition there that I respectfully ask you to sign, if you 
share the same feelings as I , on this issue. If you know others that 
might take interest in this issue , please forward this to them. 

Below you will find 2 links, one will take you to my original petition, 
the other will take you to the website, which also has a petition, 
where you can read about Buffington Island. I must say that this is of 
an urgent matter, as the gravel company is pushing to be allowed to 
begin their mining. 
I have other material on this battle if you are 
interested, email me. 
Thank You for Your Time 

John A. Rawdon 

Sign the Petition to Save Buffington Island 
http://www.petitiononline.com/Buff/petition.html 
VISIT THE SAVING BUFFINGTON ISLAND WEBSITE 
http://www.geocities.com/buffington_isle/

{{Tom}} thanks for the heads up. 
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From: FI WATROUS 
Can anyone help this fellow? 

"Subj: Re: [NYALBANY] Civil War/34th NY Infantry Regt. 
From: Trimmerrw@aol.com 
Anyone familiar with the 34th NY, sometimes called the Herkimer Regt., but 
had many from Albany including my great-great-grandfather and brother? Lt. 
Louis Chapin of Albany wrote the regimental history in 1903. 

"Ike" - we'll put this in the newsletter and see what hits..... 
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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by 
talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil 
War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of. 

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it 
so well.
"I think it is a noble and pious thing 
To do whatever we may by written 
Word or molded bronze and sculpted 
Stone to keep our memories, our 
Reverence and our love alive and 
To hand them on to new generations 
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to 
address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth 
(as we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we 
dedicate one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So 
come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a 
full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the 
Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into 
discussions on this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution 
for this "Weekly Fireside." 

AND AGAIN TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We really "fire up" with what members bring to 
the discussions, and we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire 
to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif," just drop us a line and we will comply 
with your wishes "poste- haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events***** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFH Amy, 
GFS Jayne, GFS TEG and GFS Jim and our many faithful friends :) 

03/09/2000 - Letters Songs and Poems Night 

03/16/2000 - OPEN CHAT 

03/23/2000 - When the Ozarks Burned - GFS Jim 

03/31/2000 - OPEN CHAT 

We'll See You Thursday Night..! 
Your Joyful, Intelligent and Fun-lovin' Host's/Hostess's :-) 
GFS Jim, GFS Jayne, GFS TEG and GFH Amy 

Hear Ye .... Hear Ye 

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group; 
Distribution Coast to Coast 
Week ending 12 March 2000

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Mission Statement: To serve all genealogists by providing an enjoyable 
online environment with as many helpful and reliable resources as possible. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

Ohhhhh we had some wonderful letters and poems and lots of songs Thursday night. 
Jayne kept fallin off the stump while she was reading letters but we finally tied her on 
and it was OK then. :-) Amy took her turn at story telling and it was fine, she did....... I 
was in pretty good voice for the singing and Tom kept the Cider hot to wet yer 
whistle. :D If you there, we loved havin ya and if you couldn't make it, we missed 
ya.... We hope to see you soon. 

Music: Well, this week I listened to another CD by the Chieftans. This one is called 
"Tears of Stone" and it is indeed a blockbuster. I applaud Paddy Maloney and the 
Chieftans for working so hard to gather the talent that is on this CD and not giving 
up. They spent 3 years bringing this all together and it is something. Listen to these 
artists: Brenda Fricker & Anuna, Bonnie Raitt, Natalie Merchant, Joni Mitchell, The 
Rankins, The Corrs, Sinead O'Connor, Mary Chapin Carpenter, Loreena McKennitt, 
Akiko Yano, Joan Osborne, Sissel, Eileen Ivers, Natalie MacMaster, Maire 
Breatnach, Annbjorg Lien, Diana Krall, Russell Malone, and Bishop Nathaniel 
Townsley Jr. & Gospel Jubilee. This isn't a concert, it's "an Event" by some 
incredibly talented people who love their work. Pick up a copy and then just fly away 
:D Enjoy............ 

******************* 
Editor's Note: for those of you who are AOL members, I want to encourage you to 
feel entirely free to post any Civil War Letters, or Stories or articles that you have in 
our Civil War History Files. There is also an area for you to upload photos, if you 
would desire to share those with the Civil War History community. Use 
"keyword=roots" to get to the Genealogy Main Screen. Then select Files, followed 
by selecting History and Culture and there you will find the two upload areas I 
mentioned; Civil War Files, and Civil War Photos. I would also note that the New 
Genealogy Forum Web Site is being constructed. On that Web Site, the Civil War 
History SIG will have an area to link to our Civil War Library (Lectures, Letters, 
Songs, Poems, Files, Firesides, and Photo's). When this is complete then anyone 
(not just AOL Members) will have access to all our material. We'll be sure to let you 
know when you can access it. 

This coming Thursday is "The Ozarks Burn" . 
We'll keep a light on for you ....*<>*
"************************************************************************ 
FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WE REALLY WELCOME YOU TO 
OUR MERRY BAND" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU, TRADING QUESTIONS AND 
COMMENTS AND ESPECIALLY YOUR CAMARADERIE!!! :-)... COME AGAIN 
OFTEN, WE DO INDEED "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY.. 

Every first-timer to the American Civil War History SIG gets put on the newsletter 
distribution automatically, because we like to send you a "Thank You Card" for 
coming to visit and this is our way of doing so. We hope to give you an opportunity 
to jump right in with us. If you desire NOT to receive the newsletter, then just drop us 
an email saying UNSUBSCRIBE and we will quickly remove your screen name from 
distribution. We certainly don't want to clog your mailbox with unwanted material. 
Also many of you pass on the newsletter to others that don't subscribe to AOL. We 
really want to thank you for spreading the word. I would also like to let you know that 
we would be happy to add them to our list if they have email of any sort. We 
distribute everywhere to those that have requested it. AOL membership is not a 
requirement although we'd love to see you in the Chat Room:D 
************************************************************************
THE HELP DESK 
This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday 
night that we didn't have a chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check 
it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots," 
after which will bring you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the 
"Files Library Center," then "History Files". At that point select "Civil War Files." 
Lectures and the Letters, Songs and Poems evenings are also posted in the "Files 
Library Center" under "History Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" 
when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the New Files section are 
posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting Logs and Newsletters". 
*********************************************************************** 

WEBSITES WE'VE RECEIVED

from LaddofOhio 
Libby Prison 
http://members.aol.com/jweaver300/grayson/libby.htm 

Howard, I didn't know about this one, but I do now :D Thank you 


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
And The Band Played On - An Announcement 
(Note: I'll keep this up through March)

July 2000 National Civil War Band Festival 
The American Civil War Institute of Campbellsville University and the Campbellsville University 
School of Music announced today the launching of the "greatest and most significant gathering of 
Civil War bands in the nation since 1865" with the University's sponsorship of The National 
Civil War Band Festival, July 28-30, 2000. 
The three-day music festival will be held on the campus of Campbellsville University, which is 
located in south central Kentucky (82 miles southwest of Lexington; 90 miles southeast of 
Louisville; and 150 miles northeast of Nashville). 

Organizers of the event said that they are estimating The National Civil War Band Festival to 
attract between 10,000 to 25,000 people to the City of Campbellsville. 

Host bands for the festival are the Saxton's Cornet Band, based in Lexington, Kentucky, and 
the Old Towne Brass, based in Huntsville, Alabama. Bands wishing to participate or seeking 
further information may contact either Nicky Hughes at Soyuz11@aol.com or Bob Baccus at 
wrbaccus@hiwaay.net. 

For more information concerning the festival, contact Marc C. Whitt at 270-789-5211--office 
or at whittm@campbellsvil.edu, or Dr. David McCullough, director of bands at Campbellsville 
University, at 270-789-5058--office or at mcdavid@campbellsvil.edu. 

Marc C. Whitt 
Vice President for Advancement 
Campbellsville University 
1 University Drive 
Campbellsville, Kentucky 42718-2799 
(270) 789-5211-office phone 
(270) 789-5095-office fax 

"Ted" thanks for this neat tip. It sounds like a "once in a lifetime" event..... If any of 
you Readers are interested in this, Ted has provided all the "contact" information to 
get "your dibs" in early. I would suspect this will fill up in a hurry and this is a "first 
time" gathering of this nature.... :-) I'm going to leave this up a bit so everyone can 
mark their calendars and make arrangements if they're interested. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: GFS Jayne 
March 17; Maryland = Songs of the Civil War 
"In Thinking of America" songs of the Civil War featuring Robert Trentham, 8 p.m., 
Westminster High School, Westminster. Reception 6 p.m. at Carroll County Career and 
Technology Center next door. Civil War attire, no firearms, encouraged. Adult $10 advance, 
$12.50 at the door. Students $5 advance, $7.50 at the door. 
For more information, contact: 
Carroll County Community Concert Association, P.O. Box 1680, Westminster, MD 21158-
8680, (410) 857-7200 , (410) 876-8249. 

{{{Jayne}}} - thanks for sending this one. For the readers; Robert was a guest in our 
SIG two years ago, when he published his Civil War CD "Epitaph" in honor of his 
Civil War ancestors. Soooo, Jayne if you happen to attend, you give him a big hug 
from all of us. Heh Heh Annnnd leave your musket at HOME ..... 
. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: JCHovermal 
Dear Jim: 
There is going to be a special burial service for the first Hunley crew (recently dug up from 
under a local football stadium) on March 25,2000 in Charleston, SC. There will be a memorial 
service at 10:00AM at the Battery on Charleston harbor, followed by a march to Magnolia 
Cemetery. If it's anything like the last Civil War burial they did here, it will be extremely moving! 
Horsedrawn carriages with coffins draped with flags, reinactors dressed as widows, and more! 
Susan 

{{{Susan}}} Thank you for the heads up. I'll be sure to post this one.... 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
Subj: War in Oklahoma! 
From: JRose10700 
Fort Towson is located in SE Oklahoma. -- and is scheduling a battle commemoration in 
March. Doaksville is just North of Ft. Towson. This is the location where the last Confederate 
General, Gen Stand Watie surrendered. 
March 16: 4:40 till dark: Both Armies camped at Rose Hill 
March 17: 5pm: 1 miles south of Sawyer and just west of the Kiamichi 
River: Civil War Battle 
March 18: 4:30 to 6:00pm Doaksville: Confederates and Refugees camped at 
Doaksville 
March 19: 1pm: Historic Fort Towson: Commemoration for the last confederate 
to surrender 

{{{Joan}} thanks for sending this in. I'll be sure to publish it. Oh, by the way, hold on 
to your money in "Vegas"... Heh heh 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: SusiCP & GFS TEG 
The preservation activity currently going on in Ohio concerning the Buffington Island Battlefield 
which is Ohio's only civil war battlefield, 
If more info is needed contact John Rawdon, 3471 Ellen Drive, Akron, Ohio or Margaret 
Parker, president, Meigs County Pioneer & Historical Society, 
PO Box 145, Pomeroy, Ohio 45769. 
Email addresses: 
meigscountyhistoricalsociety@dragonbbs.com 
kdashley2@hotmail.com (Keith Ashley) 

Please visit the petition to save the battlefield at 
http://www.petitiononline.com/Buff/petition.html. 

Also visit the Saving Buffington island Web Site at 
http://www.geocities.com/buffington_isle/.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!..

Here's how it works.. If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or battlefield, 
to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and 
we will post it here... Other members seeing your request and being in the near 
vicinity, and are willing to assist can email you direct (this protects your privacy) and 
work out the details. We HIGHLY recommend the "Requester" pay for all film costs 
and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" 
assistance between members (with the exception of defraying film and postage costs). 
Do unto others as.... you know :-) Keep us posted on how this is working, so we can 
share them in the "Fireside"!! 
GFS Jim
IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED ANSWER(S) TO YOUR QUESTIONS, PLEASE BE SURE TO 
LET US KNOW!!!!! 
Thanks!! - The Editors

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
We have had some gracious members offer their assistance in this area. Their screen 
names and areas they have offered to help in are listed.... Please honor their 
"goodness" and don't abuse them :-).... We ask that you do follow the guidelines 
indicated above.... 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: CW1865 
My gr gr grandfather, Pvt. Adam Schneider, 183rd Ohio Infantry, died on the Sultana on April 
17, 1865, while coming home from Confederate prison with over 2,000 other parolees. Shortly 
after, his family in Cincinnati was visited by a survivor of this disaster who was also his friend, 
Pvt. Michael Conrad, and Conrad told my gr gr grandmother what happened to her husband. I 
am looking for descendants of Conrad in the hopes that they can tell us Michael's version so 
what happened the night the Sultana went down. 
Thanks so much! 
Pam Newhouse 

{{{Pam}}} - check out the websites in last week's Fireside 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: LYoung144 
Can you tell me where to find a list of the men who rode with Quantrill? I would appreciate it 
very much. 
Lorita 

{{Lorita}} - my second answer is this website: 
http://history.cc.ukans.edu/heritage/research/quantrill.txt 
There is a pretty comprehensive roster list compiled by a Richard A. Ensminger for the 
Kansas Heritage group. He is no longer with us, but his work was passed on as a 
memorial and listed at this site. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: JCHovermal 

Could anyone help me with this one? My great grandfather James A. Furman Truett was 
enlisted into the 14th SC Infantry in Aug.1861 in a town called Lightwood Knot Springs. Does 
anyone know where that was? 

Susan Truett Hovermale 
Mt. Pleasant,SC 

{{{{Susan}}}} Here's hoping some one of the Civil War History "Faithful" can help. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: hood@rica.net (Jan Hood) and passed to us from SusiCP 
SIMON POLK enlisted in the Confederate Army on 16 April 1862 at Rudes Hill, New 
Market, VA. He went in as a Private. He was assigned to the 2nd VA Infantry, 
Company F, Winchester Rifles. This Company and Infantry rode with Stonewall 
Jackson throughout the war and was part of "Stonewall's Brigade." SIMON POLK 
was listed as 'sick' in September 1862, and in a hospital at Bunker Hill, West 
Va. He was later moved to a hospital in Martinsburg, W. Va., where he died on 
11 October 1862. The hospital is not named. 
I would appreciate anyone who may be able to help me, with any lookup or 
advice. 
Thank you VERY much. 
Jan in Shenandoah Co., Va. 

"Jan" - we're glad your "plea" was passed on to us. We'll put this to the membership 
who many dedicated and expert researchers in all aspects of the Civil War and see 
what we can find..... :-) Hey Faithful!.... What say Ye?? 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
A BIT OF COMMUNITY... 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, 
Feedback's, Items of Interest and Plea's for HELP...

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: Bipsylou 
I rarely participate in your chat room, but do read you messages and enjoy them. I learn a lot of 
history. Most of my searching in done regarding the United States Colored Troops. D. Sands 

Bipsylou - thanks for you note. Here are two regiments of Colored troops that I have 
read about recently. 54th Massachusetts and 1st Kansas. The 1st Kansas were a fierce 
group of soldiers and there are many stories about them in Missouri History. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: GLITZ01 
I know what the DAR is, but exactly what is their function? Do they do research? I hear of them 
all the time and I know I have the possibilities of joining, but I don't really know what they stand 
for. Is there a place I can read on it. 
thanks Shirley 

{{Shirley}} I had already sent you a response but then I thought: "Self, there are a ton 
of DAR members and some officers that hit the forum. Why not ask them as well?" So 
I'll do that :-) All you DAR members send Shirley a note :D 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: dalongs@earthlink.net (Don Long) 
Subject: FEW: "Our GIs Earn Enough" 
On 12 Jan, Ms Cindy Williams wrote a piece for the Washington Times 
denouncing the pay raise(s) coming service members way this year-citing 
that the stated 13% wage gap was bogus. A young airman from Hill AFB in Utah 
responds to her article below.... he ought to get a bonus for this.... 

Ms. Williams: I just had the pleasure of reading your column of 12 Jan 00, "Our GIs Earn 
Enough," and I am a bit confused. Frankly, I'm wondering where this vaunted overpayment is 
going, because as far as I can tell, it disappears every month between DFAS (The Defense 
Finance and Accounting Service)and my bank account. Checking my latest leave and earnings 
statement (LES), I see that I make $1,117.80, before taxes. After taxes, I take home $874.20. 
When I run that through Windows' Calculator, I come up with an annual salary of $13,413.60 
before taxes, and $10,490.40 after. 
I work in the Air Force Network Control Center (AFNCC), where I am part of the team 
responsible for the administration of a 25,000 host computer network. I am involved with 
infrastructure management, specifically with Cisco Systems equipment. A quick check of 
http://www.monster.com under jobs for Network Technicians in the 
Washington, D.C. area reveals a position in my career field, requiring three years' 
experience with my job. Amazingly, this job does NOT pay $13,413.60 a year, 
nor does it pay less than this. No, this job is being offered at $70,000 to $80,000 per annum. 
I'm sure you can draw the obvious conclusions. 
Also, you tout increases to Basic Allowance for Housing and Basic Allowance for Sustenance 
(housing and food allowances, respectively) as being a further boon to an already-
overcompensated force. Again, I'm curious as to where this money has gone, as BAH and BAS 
were both slashed 15% in the Hill AFB area effective in January 00. 
Given the tenor of your column, I would assume that you have never had the pleasure of serving 
your country in her armed forces. Before you take it upon yourself to once more castigate 
congressional and DoD leadership for attempting to get the families in the military's lowest pay 
brackets off AFDC, WIC, and food stamps, I suggest that you join a group of deploying 
soldiers headed for Saudi-I leave the choice of service branch up to you. 
Whatever choice you make, though, opt for the six month rotation: it will guarantee you the 
longest possible time away from your family and friends, thus giving you the full "deployment 
experience." As your group prepares to board the plane, make sure to note the spouses and 
children who are saying goodbye to their loved ones. Also take care to note that several families 
are still unsure of how they'll be able to make ends 
meet while the primary breadwinner is gone-obviously they've been squandering the vast piles of 
cash the DoD has been giving them. 
Try to deploy over a major holiday; Christmas and Thanksgiving are perennial favorites. And 
when you're actually over there, sitting in a DFP (Defensive Fire Position, the modern-day 
foxhole), shivering against the cold desert night, and the flight sergeant tells you that there aren't 
enough people on shift to relieve you for chow, remember this: trade whatever MRE you 
manage to get for the tuna noodle casserole or cheese tortellini, and add Tabasco to everything. 
Talk to your loved ones as often as you are permitted; it won't nearly be long enough or often 
enough, but take what you can get and be thankful for it. 
You may have picked up on the fact that I disagree with most of the points you present in your 
op-ed piece. But, tomorrow from Voltaire, I will defend to the death your right to say it. You 
see, I am an American fighting man, a guarantor of your First Amendment rights and every other 
right you cherish. On a daily basis, my brother and sister soldiers worldwide ensure that you and 
people like you can thumb your collective 
nose at us, all on a salary that is nothing short of pitiful and under conditions that would make 
most people cringe. We hemorrhage our best and brightest into the private sector because we 
can't offer the stability and pay of civilian companies. 
And you, Ms. Williams, have the gall to say that we make more than we deserve? 
Rubbish. 
A1C Michael Bragg 
Hill AFB AFNCC 

{{{{{Don}}}}} Glad you're back in the states and I love the article.... I will certainly get 
this in the newsletter. For you readers, I don't normally get on my soapbox, because 
that is missusing the priviledge and focus of this newsletter, but I love my country and 
I HONOR those that serve her, as I did and do. Airman First Class Bragg has spoken 
much truth, and I'm bound to share it because he is ensuring that I have the right to 
share it. Enjoy and learn!!!!! :-) I'll be quiet now .... Heh Heh !! 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: Jowhara7 
STRANGERS IN THE BOX (Author Unknown) 

Come, look with me inside this drawer, 
In this box I've often seen, 
At the pictures, black and white, 
Faces proud, still, and serene. 

I wish I knew the people, 
These strangers in the box, 
Their names and all their memories, 
Are lost among my socks. 

I wonder what their lives were like, 
How did they spend their days? 
What about their special times? 
I'll never know their ways. 

If only someone had taken time, 
To tell, who, what, where, and when, 
These faces of my heritage, 
Would come to life again. 

Could this become the fate, 
Of the pictures we take today? 
The faces and the memories, 
Someday to be passed away? 

Take time to save your stories, 
Seize the opportunity when it knocks, 
Or someday you and yours, 
Could be strangers in the box. 

{{Jacque}} Great Poem.... Thanks for sharing..
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: FI WATROUS 
Can anyone help this fellow? 

"Subj: Re: [NYALBANY] Civil War/34th NY Infantry Regt. 
From: Trimmerrw@aol.com 
Anyone familiar with the 34th NY, sometimes called the Herkimer Regt., but 
had many from Albany including my great-great-grandfather and brother? Lt. 
Louis Chapin of Albany wrote the regimental history in 1903. 

"Ike" - we'll put this in the newsletter and see what hits..... 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by 
talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil 
War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of. 

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it 
so well.
"I think it is a noble and pious thing 
To do whatever we may by written 
Word or molded bronze and sculpted 
Stone to keep our memories, our 
Reverence and our love alive and 
To hand them on to new generations 
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to 
address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth 
(as we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we 
dedicate one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So 
come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a 
full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the 
Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into 
discussions on this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution 
for this "Weekly Fireside." 

AND AGAIN TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We really "fire up" with what members bring to 
the discussions, and we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire 
to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif," just drop us a line and we will comply 
with your wishes "poste- haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events***** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFH Amy, 
GFS Jayne, GFS TEG and GFS Jim and our many faithful friends :) 

03/16/2000 - OPEN CHAT 

03/23/2000 - When the Ozarks Burned - GFS Jim. It's a sad story but one to remember about 
the land of my "Upbringing". Missouri took it hard during the Civil War, but one thing I've 
always done is to remember the hardships and the families and the towns and villages that are 
no more, so that this may never happen again. Come on out and join us for this most important 
tale.... 

03/31/2000 - OPEN CHAT 

We'll See You Thursday Night..! 
Your Joyful, Intelligent and Fun-lovin' Host's/Hostess's :-) 
GFS Jim, GFS Jayne, GFS TEG and GFH Amy

Hear Ye .... Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 19 March 2000

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Mission Statement: To serve all genealogists by providing an enjoyable online environment with as many helpful and reliable resources as possible.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Well, I sorely missed you all Thursday night, but I had a teleconference session with "Turkey" that evening. I'm still getting used to the fact that about the time I'm going to bed, they're starting to go to work for the next day. Heh Heh
Jayne sent me a copy of the Chat Log and I browsed through it and saw JRose's comment about "Shoo Fly Pie and Apple Pan Dowdy". Heh Heh - I thot I'd die laughin. About 10 years ago, this good friend at my "paying job", found out I was for all intents and purposes a "Missouri Hillbilly" and so for my next birthday she whipped up a "Shoo Fly Pie" for me and brought it into the office. Man O Man that was an incredible experience eating that pie. I was about the only one that ate any of it because it had more "Black Strap Molassas" than I have probably eaten in a lifetime... LOL Needless to say that has become a yearly tradition....
I also saw the comment about Lincoln's brother in law possibly being a Richmond Prison Commandant. Well here's the facts about that. One of the most notoriously brutal was probably Lieutenant Todd of Richmond. So your wondering is true. David Humphreys Todd, born in Lexington, Kentucky, in 1832, was the second of fourteen children in a semiwealthy, slave-owning family. He was also the half brother of Mary Todd Lincoln. The outbreak of the Civil War eventually divided the family. Eight of the children supported the Confederacy along with their father while six, including Mary, supported the Union. According to his family, even by his midteens, David had become notorious. He was in trouble with the law on several occasions and ran away from home, only to return months later with a tattoo of the Chilean flag on his arm. When the Civil War broke out, Todd was working as a plantation overseer, whose responsibility was to keep slaves in line. He was said to be brutal in that position. After receiving his commission in the Confederate army, he was stationed in Richmond and, at 29 years old, placed in charge of Confederate POWs in that city. He quickly gained a reputation for being cruel and harsh and, accordin to many prisoner's accounts, he harrassed and tortured the prisoners at every opportunity. According to a number of prison memoirs, Todd was intoxicated and belligerent most of the time. In October 1861, he was promoted to captain and transferred out of Richmond to the western front. In July 1863, Captain Todd was severely wounded at Vicksburg and died soon afterward. On the "flip-side", there were some prison commandants who were well-liked and later honored by their prisoners, such as Colonel Dimick of Fort Warren and Colonel Richard D. Owen of Camp Morton in the North, and Lieutenant Colonel Robert C. Smith of Danville and Lieutenant J.T.W. Airston and Colonel Godwin of Richmond in the South.

Music: I also noticed in the Chat Log the explosion of singing going on Heh Heh !!!! And due to the Colorado weather this last week I'll add; "the sun's so hot I froze to death, Suzanna don't you cry". And I did notice a wee bit of discussion about Western songs so here's a great CD Set for you. "Cowboy Classics - The Best of the West", a digitally remastered 4 CD Set that has all the old favorites and some of the new. Folks like "The Sons of the Pioneers", "Gene Autry", "Jimmie Davis", "Rex Allen", Mary Robbins", "Tex Ritter", "Riders in the Sky", "Slim Whitman", "Roy Rodgers and Dale Evans", "Eddy Arnold", and don't forget "Frankie Lane" doing Rawhide.... Enjoy............

A Note: as I was introducing our new Women in the Civil War series, I ran out of room for the "newsy" portions which are so good from all of you. Forgive me for this week, and I'll get them back in next week's fireside :D .......your faithful Editors....
*******************
Editor's Note: for those of you who are AOL members, I want to encourage you to feel entirely free to post any Civil War Letters, or Stories or articles that you have in our Civil War History Files. There is also an area for you to upload photos, if you would desire to share those with the Civil War History community. Use "keyword=roots" to get to the Genealogy Main Screen. Then select Files, followed by selecting History and Culture and there you will find the two upload areas I mentioned; Civil War Files, and Civil War Photos. I would also note that the New Genealogy Forum Web Site is being constructed. On that Web Site, the Civil War History SIG will have an area to link to our Civil War Library (Lectures, Letters, Songs, Poems, Files, Firesides, and Photo's). When this is complete then anyone (not just AOL Members) will have access to all our material. We'll be sure to let you know when you can access it.

This coming Thursday is "The Ozarks Burn" . "For Real this time :-)"

We'll keep a light on for you ....*<>*

"************************************************************************
FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WE REALLY WELCOME YOU TO OUR MERRY BAND" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU, TRADING QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS AND ESPECIALLY YOUR CAMARADERIE!!! :-)... COME AGAIN OFTEN, WE DO INDEED "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY..

Every first-timer to the American Civil War History SIG gets put on the newsletter distribution automatically, because we like to send you a "Thank You Card" for coming to visit and this is our way of doing so. We hope to give you an opportunity to jump right in with us. If you desire NOT to receive the newsletter, then just drop us an email saying UNSUBSCRIBE and we will quickly remove your screen name from distribution. We certainly don't want to clog your mailbox with unwanted material. Also many of you pass on the newsletter to others that don't subscribe to AOL. We really want to thank you for spreading the word. I would also like to let you know that we would be happy to add them to our list if they have email of any sort. We distribute everywhere to those that have requested it. AOL membership is not a requirement although we'd love to see you in the Chat Room:D
************************************************************************

Women in the Civil War
An Introduction to a Series to be given on future Thursday nights.

The Roswell Women - "Vanished"

On July 21, 1864, an Indiana newspaper, the "New Albany Ledger", had the following account on page one.
"A small detachment of the Southern Confederacy in the shape of two hundred and nineteen women and children, arrived in the city last evening on the Nashville train. They are the ardent admirers of Jeff Davis and the Southern cause. They were picked up 'Way down in Georgia' by order of Major-General Sherman, and forwarded to this city to be sent north of the Ohio River to remain during the war.
The population of Indiana is on a rapid increase, but we fear that the additions will not add much to the loyalty of the state. The officers in charge of the detachment report that a motley group of the disloyal citizens of Georgia, said to number fifteen hundred, of both sexes and all ages, are now at Nashville, waiting transportation to the land of freedom and drafts beyond the flow of the Ohio. These people are mostly in a destitute condition, having no means to provide for themselves a support. Why they should be sent here to be transferred North is more than we can understand".
This and other newspaper accounts constitute the last clues to the disappearance of more than four hundred women and children who were seized by Federal forces in Roswell, Georgia. These unidentified civilians upon whom Federal wrath was vented simply vanished when they put their feet on soil "north of the Ohio River," and their relatives never found out where they went, what happened to them, or where their bones lie today.
The only offense committed by these women and children: working in textile mills close to Atlanta. New York's "Commercial Advertiser" called word of the affair "a frightful disgrace" and urged readers to hope that the terse accounts of it would prove to be false. Their truthfulness, however, sheds light on a seldom-seen aspect of the life of Southern women during the war.
Coastal planter Roswell King discovered in 1835 that Vickery Creek could be dammed in such a way as to provide abundant water power. He built a thirty-foot dam and waterfall with a wooden millrace; within three years, Roswell Mills was fully operational.
By 1850 King's operation required five bales of cotton a day for production of shirting, yarn, and osnaburgs -- several kinds of coarse linen first made in Osnaburg, Germany. About one hundred and fifty women worked the mills at that time, eleven hours a day, six days a week. The war brought new, imperative demands for cloth. No Georgia community was better prepared to meet that demand than Roswell -- boasting two cotton mills and one woolen mill at the time. Many of the workers lived in sturdy, two-story apartment buildings.
With Federal forces pushing continually southward from their starting point at Chattanooga, the day of July 4, 1864, saw some furious action. Confederates tried to bar the entrance of the enemy from Ruff's Station, about five miles above Marietta, Georgia. That action showed the Federals that the Rebels would fiercely contest any approach to the rail center of Atlanta.
C.S. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston had spent weeks fortifying high bluffs along the Chattahoochee River. They constituted the most formidable obstacle that lay in front of Federal forces. Even Union Gen. William T. Sherman knew that hasty frontal attacks would be futile. Until troops could be moved across the river in great numbers, there was no way he could strike directly at his next target.
The Yankees knew that north of the city of Columbus, Georgis, there were very few bridges across the Chattachoochee. The best of them were sure to be burned by Rebels once their men and guns were across the waterway. One of these bridges was located at Roswell and ran parallel to a long Atlantic and Western Railroad bridge. Since it had been built solely for use by wagons, this structure wasn't suitable for movement of troops and heavy field artillery. However, numerous ferries were believed to operate between the railroad bridge and Atlanta.
Sherman sent Gens. James B. McPherson and John M. Schofield to locate the lower ferries. At the same time, he ordered Gen. Kenner Garrard to head for Roswell and its bridge. The cavalry leader asked what he should do on reaching Roswell, a village about which little was known. "Don't make a damned bit of difference," his commander stormed, "so you get out of here and go for the rebels."
Garrard's advance column reached Roswell on July the 5th, with the main body of his riders arriving the next day. A small opposition force, falling back toward Atlanta, had burned the bridge over the Chattahoochee as they retreated. Sherman and his commanders had learned to adapt however, preferring good fording places to bridges.
Roswell owed its very existence to one of these shallow fords. In days before white men gained control of the region, the old Native American Hightower Trail ran across the Chattahoochee River at this very fording place. Yankees secured the ford, taking stock of the assets of the captured village. To Garrard's surprise, he found that despite its small size, Roswell was a major manufacturing center. Garrard and his men set all three mills on fire. That night he reported to his commander: One of the cotton mills, he said, was equipped with 216 looms. All three mills had been working at capacity, "making cloth, thread and rope for the rebels." Several thousand yards of cloth were confiscated. As yet, however, the Yankee cavalryman had only found time to inspect one of the mills, he reported. Though it looked much like the other Roswell structures, he found a French flag flying over it. After consideration, he decided that the flag was a Rebel ruse. So he ignored the possibility of an international incident and ordered that it be torched along with the other buildings.
Sherman received Garrard's report "in the field near Chattahoochee" on the 7th of July. He promptly replied that he "had no idea that the factories at Roswell remained in operation." He then gave his full approval to the burning of the factories, even though he had not ordered it.
Furthermore, use of the French flag at Roswell triggered an outburst of Sherman's famous temper. "You will arrest the owners and employees and send them, under guard, charged with treason, to Marietta," he ordered. He then continued by saying:
"I will see as to any man in America hoisting the French flag and then devoting his labor and capital in supplying armies in open hostility to our government. Should you, under the impulse of anger, hang the wretch, I approve the act beforehand."
Sherman's long telegram to Garrard further ordered him to: "Arrest all people, male and female, connected with these factories, no matter what the clamor, and let them foot it, under guard, to Marietta, whence I will send them by cars to the North. The poor women will make a howl. Let them take their children and clothing, provided they have the means of hauling or you can spare them."
Back in Roswell, Gen. Grenville Dodge was busy attempting to rebuild the Chattahoochee River bridge with lumber salvaged from the ruined factories. Celebrating the cordial telegram from his commander, Garrard ordered a ration of whiskey for each of his men -- only the second he'd provided it since hostilities began. No one knows precisely how many women were to be treated as traitors and deported to the North. Most estimates range between 350 and 400 adults. One account says that two of the female workers were black. During a period of about seventy-two hours, all of the Roswell women and some of their children were sent to Marietta, a few miles away. According to Garrard, they went in U.S. Army wagons. Dodge recalled years later, however, that the women climbed on the backs of horses behind cavalrymen and rode to Marietta without saddles. A correspondent for the New York Tribune said he personally saw "the 400 factory girls loaded into one hundred ten wagons" for what he believed to be a thirteen-mile journey. "Only think of it!" the newsman wrote. "Four hundred weeping and terrifed Ellens, Susans, and Maggies transported in the seatless and springless army wagons, away from their lovers and brothers of the sunny South; and all this for the offense of weaving tent cloth and spinning stocking yarn!" Yankee Capt. David P. Conyngham, in a letter sent home, wrote simply that "it was feeling to witness how the women wept."
Official U.S. Army records plus letters of eyewitnesses make it clear that the women reached Marietta. Ted Upson of the 100th Indiana regiment wrote home that: "We have some 400 young women in the old Seminary Building near town. They have been working in a factory making cloth for the Confederate government. Some of them are tough and it's a hard job to keep them straight and to keep the men away from them."
Harper's Weekly artist Theodore R. Davis, who sketched occupied Marietta, didn't say where the factory owmen were housed during their brief stay. Reporting to Sherman by telegram, Gen. George H. Thomas said that "the Roswell factory hands, 400 or 500 in number, have arrived. Most of them are women. I can only order them transportation to Nashville, where it seems hard to set them adrift. What had best be done with them?"
Sherman replied tersely, "I have ordered General Webster at Nashville to dispose of them. They will be sent to Indiana."
Women forcibly deported to the North made up only part of the stream of civilians using the mostly single-track railroad held by Yankee invaders, Col. D.C. McCallum, Chief of Federal Military Railroads, estimated that for a time one thousand refugees headed for Nashville each day. According to him, most who reached that city were turned away.
Even in the emotional climate of war, Union supporters and leaders questioned Sherman's actions with respect to the Roswell women. "The capture was a novel one in the history of wars," the Cincinnati Commercial informed it's readers. No formal justification of the deportation was ever offered by U.S. officials. Since the United States had not actually declared war on the Confederacy, a scholar would probably say that the factory workers couldn't possibly have been guilty of treason. More personal -- and even more obscure -- is the question of what happened to so many women and their children. Notice of them in official records ends at Nashville. Newspaper stories indicate that they were actually dispersed in Indiana. If this took place, their economic status and the troubled times meant that all ties with their former lives in Roswell were severed.
This nearly forgotten side incident of the Civil War was, at the time, only a minor incident. Armies were in collision, cities were being shelled and burned, and generals on both sides were being shot from the saddle. Thousands of men lay dead on battlefields, and tens of thousands were being subjected to the surgeon's saw for amputation of legs and arms. Under such circumstances, who had the time, inclination, or writing materials with which to record the movements of such an obscure group of refugees?
The Roswell Historical Society has only a smattering of information about the women who were sent North from that location. Neither the Georgia State Archives, the University of Georgia libraries, nor the Atlanta Historical Society has any significant information not already included in the offical records or the letters of soldiers. The Indiana State Library has a few brief newspaper accounts of arrivals in the state, but no information about any subsequent events in which the women were involved.
All of this brings this story to a close with one question: Is it possible, even in the turmoil of war, that an estimated four hundred American women forced to go "north of the Ohio River" could have been turned loose to fend for themselves and subsequently have vanished without a trace?
************************************************************************

THE HELP DESK
This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D


Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots," after which will bring you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center," then "History Files". At that point select "Civil War Files." Lectures and the Letters, Songs and Poems evenings are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting Logs and Newsletters".
***********************************************************************

Weekly Web Sites we've received
from GFS Jim
The researched list of the Roster of Quantrill's Raiders
http://history.cc.ukans.edu/heritage/research/quantrill.txt
The late Richard A. Ensminger spent many years researching this list from various books written in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The list on this website indicates his source of each name on the roster. His work was passed on as a memorial and listed at this site by the Kansas Heritage group
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

And The Band Played On - An Announcement
(Note: I'll keep this up through March)

July 2000 National Civil War Band Festival
The American Civil War Institute of Campbellsville University and the Campbellsville University School of Music announced today the launching of the "greatest and most significant gathering of Civil War bands in the nation since 1865" with the University's sponsorship of The National Civil War Band Festival, July 28-30, 2000.
The three-day music festival will be held on the campus of Campbellsville University, which is located in south central Kentucky (82 miles southwest of Lexington; 90 miles southeast of Louisville; and 150 miles northeast of Nashville).

Organizers of the event said that they are estimating The National Civil War Band Festival to attract between 10,000 to 25,000 people to the City of Campbellsville.

Host bands for the festival are the Saxton's Cornet Band, based in Lexington, Kentucky, and the Old Towne Brass, based in Huntsville, Alabama. Bands wishing to participate or seeking further information may contact either Nicky Hughes at Soyuz11@aol.com or Bob Baccus at wrbaccus@hiwaay.net.

For more information concerning the festival, contact Marc C. Whitt at 270-789-5211--office or at whittm@campbellsvil.edu, or Dr. David McCullough, director of bands at Campbellsville University, at 270-789-5058--office or at mcdavid@campbellsvil.edu.

Marc C. Whitt
Vice President for Advancement
Campbellsville University
1 University Drive
Campbellsville, Kentucky 42718-2799
(270) 789-5211-office phone
(270) 789-5095-office fax

"Ted" thanks for this neat tip. It sounds like a "once in a lifetime" event..... If any of you Readers are interested in this, Ted has provided all the "contact" information to get "your dibs" in early. I would suspect this will fill up in a hurry and this is a "first time" gathering of this nature.... :-) I'm going to leave this up a bit so everyone can mark their calendars and make arrangements if they're interested.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
From: JCHovermal
Dear Jim:
There is going to be a special burial service for the first Hunley crew (recently dug up from under a local football stadium) on March 25,2000 in Charleston, SC. There will be a memorial service at 10:00AM at the Battery on Charleston harbor, followed by a march to Magnolia Cemetery. If it's anything like the last Civil War burial they did here, it will be extremely moving! Horsedrawn carriages with coffins draped with flags, reinactors dressed as widows, and more!
Susan

{{{Susan}}} Thank you for the heads up. I'll be sure to post this one....
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
From: SusiCP & GFS TEG
The preservation activity currently going on in Ohio concerning the Buffington Island Battlefield which is Ohio's only civil war battlefield,
If more info is needed contact John Rawdon, 3471 Ellen Drive, Akron, Ohio or Margaret Parker, president, Meigs County Pioneer & Historical Society,
PO Box 145, Pomeroy, Ohio 45769.
Email addresses:
meigscountyhistoricalsociety@dragonbbs.com
kdashley2@hotmail.com (Keith Ashley)

Please visit the petition to save the battlefield at
http://www.petitiononline.com/Buff/petition.html.

Also visit the Saving Buffington island Web Site at
http://www.geocities.com/buffington_isle/.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!..

Here's how it works.. If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will post it here... Other members seeing your request and being in the near vicinity, and are willing to assist can email you direct (this protects your privacy) and work out the details. We HIGHLY recommend the "Requester" pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" assistance between members (with the exception of defraying film and postage costs). Do unto others as.... you know :-) Keep us posted on how this is working, so we can share them in the "Fireside"!!
GFS Jim

IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED ANSWER(S) TO YOUR QUESTIONS, PLEASE BE SURE TO LET US KNOW!!!!!
Thanks!! - The Editors

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
We have had some gracious members offer their assistance in this area. Their screen names and areas they have offered to help in are listed.... Please honor their "goodness" and don't abuse them :-).... We ask that you do follow the guidelines indicated above....

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
From: CW1865
My gr gr grandfather, Pvt. Adam Schneider, 183rd Ohio Infantry, died on the Sultana on April 17, 1865, while coming home from Confederate prison with over 2,000 other parolees. Shortly after, his family in Cincinnati was visited by a survivor of this disaster who was also his friend, Pvt. Michael Conrad, and Conrad told my gr gr grandmother what happened to her husband. I am looking for descendants of Conrad in the hopes that they can tell us Michael's version so what happened the night the Sultana went down.
Thanks so much!
Pam Newhouse

{{{Pam}}} - check out the websites in last week's Fireside
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
From: JCHovermal

Could anyone help me with this one? My great grandfather James A. Furman Truett was enlisted into the 14th SC Infantry in Aug.1861 in a town called Lightwood Knot Springs. Does anyone know where that was?

Susan Truett Hovermale
Mt. Pleasant,SC

{{{{Susan}}}} Here's hoping some one of the Civil War History "Faithful" can help.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
From: hood@rica.net (Jan Hood) and passed to us from SusiCP
SIMON POLK enlisted in the Confederate Army on 16 April 1862 at Rudes Hill, New
Market, VA. He went in as a Private. He was assigned to the 2nd VA Infantry,
Company F, Winchester Rifles. This Company and Infantry rode with Stonewall
Jackson throughout the war and was part of "Stonewall's Brigade." SIMON POLK
was listed as 'sick' in September 1862, and in a hospital at Bunker Hill, West
Va. He was later moved to a hospital in Martinsburg, W. Va., where he died on
11 October 1862. The hospital is not named.
I would appreciate anyone who may be able to help me, with any lookup or
advice.
Thank you VERY much.
Jan in Shenandoah Co., Va.

"Jan" - we're glad your "plea" was passed on to us. We'll put this to the membership who many dedicated and expert researchers in all aspects of the Civil War and see what we can find..... :-) Hey Faithful!.... What say Ye??
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

A BIT OF COMMUNITY...

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedback's, Items of Interest and Plea's for HELP...


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
From: FI WATROUS
Can anyone help this fellow?

"Subj: Re: [NYALBANY] Civil War/34th NY Infantry Regt.
From: Trimmerrw@aol.com
Anyone familiar with the 34th NY, sometimes called the Herkimer Regt., but
had many from Albany including my great-great-grandfather and brother? Lt.
Louis Chapin of Albany wrote the regimental history in 1903.

"Ike" - we'll put this in the newsletter and see what hits.....
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War".

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.


Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly Fireside."

AND AGAIN TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :)

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We really "fire up" with what members bring to the discussions, and we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif," just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events*****

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFH Amy, GFS Jayne, GFS TEG and GFS Jim and our many faithful friends :)

03/23/2000 - When the Ozarks Burned - GFS Jim. It's a sad story but one to remember about the land of my "Upbringing". Missouri took it hard during the Civil War, but one thing I've always done is to remember the hardships and the families and the towns and villages that are no more, so that this may never happen again. Come on out and join us for this most important tale....

03/30/2000 - OPEN CHAT

04/06/2000 - Nurse and Spy, the Story of Sarah Edmonds - part of the Women in the Civil War Series

04/13/2000 - "Letters, Songs and Poems Night" - don't forget to send yours in. We'll be sure to read them :D

04/20/2000 - OPEN CHAT

04/27/2000 - "A Woman Who Was Banished" - the Story of Rose Greenhow - part of the Women in the Civil War Series

We'll See You Thursday Night..!
Your Joyful, Intelligent and Fun-lovin' Host's/Hostess's :-)
GFS Jim, GFS Jayne, GFS TEG and GFH Amy

Hear Ye .... Hear Ye 

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group; 
Distribution Coast to Coast 
Week ending 26 March 2000

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
Mission Statement: To serve all genealogists by providing an enjoyable 
online environment with as many helpful and reliable resources as possible. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

If you couldn't make Thursday night with us last week, we certainly missed you. 
There was a fine turn-out of the "Faithful", and the story "The Ozarks Burn" was 
great. Heh heh, Of course that has nothing to do with the fact that I got to be the 
"Storyteller". LOL :-) Missouri had such a very hard time during the Civil War that just 
about every tale about that land just breaks your heart, regardless of whether you're 
telling about the Blue or the Gray..... 
I'm also excited about the "Women in the Civil War" series we're starting. We'll do a 
mix of putting some in the "Weekly Fireside" and some as stories on Thursday 
night. We hope you'll like them. We don't hear about the ladies much in this area. 
Oh, by the way. Thanks for you feedback on AIC Michael Bragg's letter. The 
responses were mixed as they usually are, but on occassion I think it a good thing to 
post some of those to get you thinking..... :-) 

Music: Now I have a mix of music goodies this week. The first CD I have for you is 
The Fabulous Louis Armstrong. Louie has been one of my favorite Jazz artists 
since the day I heard him as a young'un. Trumpeteer extraordinaire..... This CD is a 
recent remastered version from RCA Victor, and includes all his greats. Hello Dolly, 
St. Louis Blues, Basin Street Blues, Swing You Cats, Ain't Misbehavin', Rockin' 
Chair, Mood Indigo, and What a Wonderful World. The next CD is totally different. 
For those of you with a love of religious music, I have an incredible CD called Celtic 
Psalms - Music to Soothe the Soul. And that it does. The voice of Tabitha Fair 
singing the arrangements of Deirdre Nicole Neely is something to hear. I'm listening 
now as I type this and I'm a' smilin'..... 
Enjoy............ 

******************* 
Editor's Note: for those of you who are AOL members, I want to encourage you to 
feel entirely free to post any Civil War Letters, or Stories or articles that you have in 
our Civil War History Files. There is also an area for you to upload photos, if you 
would desire to share those with the Civil War History community. Use 
"keyword=roots" to get to the Genealogy Main Screen. Then select Files, followed 
by selecting History and Culture and there you will find the two upload areas I 
mentioned; Civil War Files, and Civil War Photos. I would also note that the New 
Genealogy Forum Web Site is being constructed. On that Web Site, the Civil War 
History SIG will have an area to link to our Civil War Library (Lectures, Letters, 
Songs, Poems, Files, Firesides, and Photo's). When this is complete then anyone 
(not just AOL Members) will have access to all our material. We'll be sure to let you 
know when you can access it. 

This coming Thursday is OPEN CHAT . Bring you Civil War questions, answers 
and stories....
We'll keep a light on for you ....*<>*
"************************************************************************ 
FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WE REALLY WELCOME YOU TO 
OUR MERRY BAND" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU, TRADING QUESTIONS AND 
COMMENTS AND ESPECIALLY YOUR CAMARADERIE!!! :-)... COME AGAIN 
OFTEN, WE DO INDEED "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY.. 

Every first-timer to the American Civil War History SIG gets put on the newsletter 
distribution automatically, because we like to send you a "Thank You Card" for 
coming to visit and this is our way of doing so. We hope to give you an opportunity 
to jump right in with us. If you desire NOT to receive the newsletter, then just drop us 
an email saying UNSUBSCRIBE and we will quickly remove your screen name from 
distribution. We certainly don't want to clog your mailbox with unwanted material. 
Also many of you pass on the newsletter to others that don't subscribe to AOL. We 
really want to thank you for spreading the word. I would also like to let you know that 
we would be happy to add them to our list if they have email of any sort. We 
distribute everywhere to those that have requested it. AOL membership is not a 
requirement although we'd love to see you in the Chat Room:D 
************************************************************************
Women in the Civil War 
An Introduction to a Series to be given on future Thursday nights.

************************************************************************
THE HELP DESK 
This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday 
night that we didn't have a chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check 
it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots," 
after which will bring you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the 
"Files Library Center," then "History Files". At that point select "Civil War Files." 
Lectures and the Letters, Songs and Poems evenings are also posted in the "Files 
Library Center" under "History Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" 
when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the New Files section are 
posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting Logs and Newsletters". 
*********************************************************************** 

WEBSITES WE'VE RECEIVED 
from SusiCP, Roygcgrfa and quite a few others 
Making of America - Civil War Journals 
http://moa.cit.cornell.edu/MOA/MOA-JOURNALS2/WARO.html 
This site has been given before but it is so good. It is Cornell Univ. and there are 36 
volumns of material out here. Check it out and certainly bookmark this one for many 
future visits.


Civil WAR letter of C.W. Gallentine 
http://www.mindsync.com/tgallent/c_w__gallentine.htm 

from: IrishInCal 
Military History Online 
http://www.militaryhistoryonline.com/gettysburg/misc/photo.htm 


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
And The Band Played On - An Announcement 
(Note: I'll keep this up through March)

July 2000 National Civil War Band Festival 
The American Civil War Institute of Campbellsville University and the Campbellsville University 
School of Music announced today the launching of the "greatest and most significant gathering of 
Civil War bands in the nation since 1865" with the University's sponsorship of The National 
Civil War Band Festival, July 28-30, 2000. 
The three-day music festival will be held on the campus of Campbellsville University, which is 
located in south central Kentucky (82 miles southwest of Lexington; 90 miles southeast of 
Louisville; and 150 miles northeast of Nashville). 

Organizers of the event said that they are estimating The National Civil War Band Festival to 
attract between 10,000 to 25,000 people to the City of Campbellsville. 

Host bands for the festival are the Saxton's Cornet Band, based in Lexington, Kentucky, and 
the Old Towne Brass, based in Huntsville, Alabama. Bands wishing to participate or seeking 
further information may contact either Nicky Hughes at Soyuz11@aol.com or Bob Baccus at 
wrbaccus@hiwaay.net. 

For more information concerning the festival, contact Marc C. Whitt at 270-789-5211--office 
or at whittm@campbellsvil.edu, or Dr. David McCullough, director of bands at Campbellsville 
University, at 270-789-5058--office or at mcdavid@campbellsvil.edu. 

Marc C. Whitt 
Vice President for Advancement 
Campbellsville University 
1 University Drive 
Campbellsville, Kentucky 42718-2799 
(270) 789-5211-office phone 
(270) 789-5095-office fax 

"Ted" thanks for this neat tip. It sounds like a "once in a lifetime" event..... If any of 
you Readers are interested in this, Ted has provided all the "contact" information to 
get "your dibs" in early. I would suspect this will fill up in a hurry and this is a "first 
time" gathering of this nature.... :-) I'm going to leave this up a bit so everyone can 
mark their calendars and make arrangements if they're interested. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: frye@gnat.net 
I Just wanted to let you know I appreciate your mention of my services in your round tables 
[and newsletters] and that I have added a new page to my site in which your members might 
have an interest. Actually I have added 2 pages to my site. 
One.....Websites of Decendants of Prisoners another... just Decendants of Andersonville 
prisoners. The second shows Prisoners name, State, Regiment, Company, as well as the 
decendants name and email address. I think it will help researchers find one another. If you 
could mention it in your next roundtable, I would be very thankful. 

Kevin 
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html 
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/decendants.html 
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/Decendants.html 

"Kevin" - Thanks for the update. We'll be sure to spread the word :-) Kevin Frye has 
been most gracious in provided assistance to a number of members with his 
information and we really want to thank him for this good information. 
Jayne also sent me a note to this as follows: You will note the second two URL's are 
the same, EXCEPT for the capital "D". The URL's are case sensitive and will take 
you to two differents sites. While there are a whole lot of names on the two new 
websites, it's still being built. Be sure to check back often and if you are a decendant 
and want to be added, let Kevin know! You can send email to him at: frye@gnat.net 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: SusiCP & GFS TEG 
The preservation activity currently going on in Ohio concerning the Buffington Island Battlefield 
which is Ohio's only civil war battlefield, 
If more info is needed contact John Rawdon, 3471 Ellen Drive, Akron, Ohio or Margaret 
Parker, president, Meigs County Pioneer & Historical Society, 
PO Box 145, Pomeroy, Ohio 45769. 
Email addresses: 
meigscountyhistoricalsociety@dragonbbs.com 
kdashley2@hotmail.com (Keith Ashley) 

Please visit the petition to save the battlefield at 
http://www.petitiononline.com/Buff/petition.html. 

Also visit the Saving Buffington island Web Site at 
http://www.geocities.com/buffington_isle/.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!..

Here's how it works.. If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or battlefield, 
to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and 
we will post it here... Other members seeing your request and being in the near 
vicinity, and are willing to assist can email you direct (this protects your privacy) and 
work out the details. We HIGHLY recommend the "Requester" pay for all film costs 
and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" 
assistance between members (with the exception of defraying film and postage costs). 
Do unto others as.... you know :-) Keep us posted on how this is working, so we can 
share them in the "Fireside"!! 
GFS Jim
IF YOU HAVE RECEIVED ANSWER(S) TO YOUR QUESTIONS, PLEASE BE SURE TO 
LET US KNOW!!!!! 
Thanks!! - The Editors

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
We have had some gracious members offer their assistance in this area. Their screen 
names and areas they have offered to help in are listed.... Please honor their 
"goodness" and don't abuse them :-).... We ask that you do follow the guidelines 
indicated above.... 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: CW1865 
My gr gr grandfather, Pvt. Adam Schneider, 183rd Ohio Infantry, died on the Sultana on April 
17, 1865, while coming home from Confederate prison with over 2,000 other parolees. Shortly 
after, his family in Cincinnati was visited by a survivor of this disaster who was also his friend, 
Pvt. Michael Conrad, and Conrad told my gr gr grandmother what happened to her husband. I 
am looking for descendants of Conrad in the hopes that they can tell us Michael's version so 
what happened the night the Sultana went down. 
Thanks so much! 
Pam Newhouse 

{{{Pam}}} - thanks for you request. Membership - here's a request! If any of you have 
this individual "Pvt. Michael Conrad" as a Civil War Ancestor, and in your research 
if you have possible connections to current descendants who might just have 
information relating to the incident Pam is referring to, email us and Pam... This 
would be a great story if Pam finds information. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: JCHovermal 

Could anyone help me with this one? My great grandfather James A. Furman Truett was 
enlisted into the 14th SC Infantry in Aug.1861 in a town called Lightwood Knot Springs. Does 
anyone know where that was? 

Susan Truett Hovermale 
Mt. Pleasant,SC 

{{{{Susan}}}} Here's hoping some one of the Civil War History "Faithful" can help. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: hood@rica.net (Jan Hood) and passed to us from SusiCP 
SIMON POLK enlisted in the Confederate Army on 16 April 1862 at Rudes Hill, New 
Market, VA. He went in as a Private. He was assigned to the 2nd VA Infantry, 
Company F, Winchester Rifles. This Company and Infantry rode with Stonewall 
Jackson throughout the war and was part of "Stonewall's Brigade." SIMON POLK 
was listed as 'sick' in September 1862, and in a hospital at Bunker Hill, West 
Va. He was later moved to a hospital in Martinsburg, W. Va., where he died on 
11 October 1862. The hospital is not named. 
I would appreciate anyone who may be able to help me, with any lookup or 
advice. 
Thank you VERY much. 
Jan in Shenandoah Co., Va. 

"Jan" - we're glad your "plea" was passed on to us. We'll put this to the membership 
who many dedicated and expert researchers in all aspects of the Civil War and see 
what we can find..... :-) Hey Faithful!.... What say Ye?? 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: Bama76MBA 
Sylvester Steiner, my great, great, great grandfather, was a member of the 
28th Regiment throughout the Civil War. The unit was referred to as the 
"Goldstream Regiment" and organized at Philadelphia and mustered in June 28, 
1861. Would anyone have information on the reason for the name of the unit, 
Sylvester Steiner, or references to the service or make up of the unit. 
Thanks, Dennis 

Jim: Thank you for responding to my inquiry. I appreciate you adding me to your list. I've 
obtained info on his service through the National Archives and a history of the unit's service in 
Bates. Have never seen anything mentioning his promotion to sergeant or the reason for the 
nickname of "Goldstream Regiment". He was from Westmoreland County in Western PA, but 
was mustered in at Philadelphia in the eastern part of the state. Any info will be much 
appreciated. 

If I can help anyone in your group, please feel free to contact me. I'm in the cradle of the 
Confederacy, Montgomery, Alabama, but was raised a "Yankee" in Latrobe, PA. Guess I'm on 
the fence now!!!!!!!! thanks, Dennis 

Dennis - glad you got my reponse OK. We'll get your question posted this week and see 
what comes back. I'll bet GFS TEG or GFH Amy may know something about this one. 
And thanks for you offer of help.... 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: LaddofOhio 
Jim this lady, on another List, is requesting help with Civil War Veteran 
Census data. Can you be of help? If so, mail me and I will pass it on 
to her through the appropiate List! Thanks! 
"Hello, Does anyone have access to the Special Census taken of Civil War 
Veterans? I am looking for any BERRYHILL vets. 
My grgrGrandfather William BERRYHILL died during the war, 
and it is said that at least two of his brothers were also in the Civil War, 
but I don't know which ones; They could be: David, Matthew, James or John Thanks for any 
help, Kathy 
[a ps:] I forgot to mention that I may not have all of the sons' names. 
It is also possible that there was an Alexander and possibly others. 

[Since this is from a List concerning Putnam County, Ohio, I suspect that 
the information would fall into Ohio Ciil War Veterans.] 
Donald L LADD 
LDG Directory Manager 
to view the Directory: 
http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~ladd/id.htm
"Don" thanks for forwarding the request. We'll forward any responses back 
through you on this one. Hey FAITHFUL!!!! What do you know about Civil 
War Census records for Ohio???? While you're pondering, I'll check the my 
Family History Center Civil War research notes and see what I can find. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
A BIT OF COMMUNITY... 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for 
information, Feedback's, Items of Interest and Plea's for HELP...

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: Keskalublu 
Thanks for the additional info about the 1918 flu epidemic. I am wondering about an epidemic 
that may have ocurred in Missouri between about 1865-1870. It was probably a flu or 
something similar. I lost a gr-great grandfather and his wife. He was a Dr and they had moved 
there from MS. It is possible he may have served in the Confederacy, but I don't think so. His 
name was John Knox. Anyone having any info about him or this epidemic---please let me 
know. Thanks Linda 

{{Linda}} thanks for you feedback. The only one I know was the really bad flu 
epidemic in Missouri around 1915 or thereabouts. I have accounts from my mother of 
her mother being deathly ill and loosing all her hair during that one. (in Bates Co.). 
We'll ask the "Faithful" if anyone knows out there. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: FI WATROUS 
Can anyone help this fellow? 

"Subj: Re: [NYALBANY] Civil War/34th NY Infantry Regt. 
From: Trimmerrw@aol.com 
Anyone familiar with the 34th NY, sometimes called the Herkimer Regt., but 
had many from Albany including my great-great-grandfather and brother? Lt. 
Louis Chapin of Albany wrote the regimental history in 1903. 

"Ike" - we'll put this in the newsletter and see what hits..... 
**************************************** 
From: Pollyann9 
Thought you might be able to use this. I received it on the DODD mailing list via computer. 
Have a great day. 
Polly 

This is a copy of a letter written by a Confederate soldier to his 
parents just before his death by hanging as a spy. The letter is long, 
but may be of interest to all DODDS and descendants of the other men 
mentioned in the letter. 
Knoxville Jail, Jan. 6th, '64 
Mr. Travis Dodd 
Richmond, Ky 
My dear Father, 
Under far different circumstances to those by which I was surrounded when 
I last wrote, I take my seat to write you this letter. I am under closer 
guard and laboring under the sentence of DEATH pronounced by the 
courtmartial held in this city. I was captured in Sevier County, 16 
miles southeast of this place, while on my way to rejoin my command with 
Longstreet. By referring to the map you will notice Loudon, on the 
Holston River, on the railroad running from Chattanooga to Knoxville. 
After Longstreet came up from Bragg's army to Knoxville, preceded by our 
division of cavalry, our wagon trains (cavalry) came up to Loudon. I had 
not been with the command since Bragg's retreat from Tullahoma to 
Bridgeport and the line of the Tennessee River. 
I lost my horse on the retreat and it is almost impossible to get them in 
Ga. After we came to Loudon I bought a horse to trade for a better one, 
and went with a detail from camp, up the little Tennessee river for the 
purpose of getting a horse. While we were out I got a horse, and the 
Federal troops coming up from Chattanooga to relieve Burnside at 
Knoxville got possession of the country, our wagon trains going on to the 
army in my absence. We started to go through Blount and Sevier Counties, 
along the foot of the mountain to Strawberry Plains, in Jefferson County, 
to where we understood Longstreet was. There were nine or ten of us 
together, but we got separated in the dark and but three of went on 
together. We went on to Marysville, and there our horses were captured. 
We ran into the Federal pickets, were fired upon, ran across a field; one 
of the boys with us had his horse to fall with him, my saddle turned, 
bridle broke and my animal got away from me, the third man jumped off his 
horse, and thus we lost our horses. We made out on foot; come around the 
town and some seven miles above to Little River where we laid up the next 
day in the woods, and at night crossed the river and came to a Mr. Hiram 
Bayles, to whom I had been referred by Major Pugh, as a good Southern 
man. We got something to eat and stayed there until the next evening, 
then got directions to Timothy Chandlers, in Sevier County. We missed 
the way two or three times and had to stop and inquire. 
We passed near to where the Home Guards were camped, finally found Mr. 
Chandlers, got something to eat and directions. 'Twas dark and rainy, 10 
o'clock at night, we went to his barn and concluded to get in the straw 
and stay till the next night, and then go through, we thought we could 
make it. The next day the Home Guards got on track, searched the barn, 
found the two men that were with me and myself. I had on a blue Federal 
overcoat and blue pants, when captured. The pants is our uniform. 
I was tried by the court-martial as a spy, but the charge and 
specifications could not be sustained; yet they have condemned me to be 
hung as a spy, the execution to take place day after tomorrow, between 
the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. I feel prepared to meet my fate as a 
soldier, and firmly rely on God's promises to save the penitent. I feel, 
and know, that my past life has not been in accordance with the commands 
laid down in the Bible, but yet I know that He is able to save. All that 
is required is a full surrender of heart, which I freely give, relying 
implicitly on the promises of His Holy Word for acceptance. I find much 
comfort in the scriptures, which shall be my last and latest companion. 
I am treated as kindly by the guard as I could under the circumstances. 
The Rev. Mr. Martin, of the Presbyterian Church, is visiting me and 
affords me much consolation; also Mr. Hollington, Chaplain of the 11th 
Ohio, and the Chaplin of the Post, Mr. Bent. I feel, dear Father and 
Mother, that if I suffer penalty tomorrow, that the exchange of worlds 
will be for the better, that I will join my sainted mother in heaven, 
there worship and adore my God through endless futurity. 
I want you to give my love (after accepting for yourself and my mother, 
the deepest of my heart) to all my friends. Do not grieve for me, my 
dear parents, for I am leaving a world of sin and crime for one of 
perfect bliss. I can say no more. 
Your loving son. 
E. S. Dodd, 
Private Co. D, 
Terry's Texas Rangers 

{{Pollyann}} Great letter - thanks for sending it. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: SusiCP 
HI Jim. This might be worth a comment in the newspaper for those doing research and run into 
this oddity.. I didn't realize they recruited like this or had adds in paper.. 
LET alone kidnapped them.. MI long way from NY for joining I think but his points to ponder 
make sense.. 

Susi 
----------------- 
SkyBirdy@aol.com wrote: 
I finally got the civil war records of one of my Great grandfathers. And 
he enlisted in Queensbury, Warren Co. New York but he was in the Co. M. 1st 
Reg't Maryland Cavalry. My question is--how could someone enlist in the Maryland Cavalry in 
New York? 
Off hand I can think of a few scenarios. Some will be easier to check out and disprove than 
others. Letters from other soldiers in the Regiment and letters from your soldiers extended 
family might give some clues. Also newspapers from 'the North country' would be worth 
reading. Start with around the time he enlisted, then after every major battle the 1st MD was in, 
for a few weeks. 

1. He knew someone in that Regiment, and wanted to serve with them. 

2. The 1st Md Cav was giving a big bounty & he wanted to cash in. [some bounties went as 
high as a thousand dollars for an enlistment, depending on how much the county was able to 
raise] He could have read about them in a newspaper, heard it in a letter from someone in MD, 
or by the 'grapevine' that traveled with the news. 

3. He enlisted in a 'regiment to be formed'... but they never raised enough men, so Uncle Sam 
sent him where he was needed. Or he said 'I want to serve in the Cav', and that was one that 
had openings. 

4. A recruiter from MD took a boat ride up the coast/Hudson/Champlain canal/Lake 
Champlain, and sold some locals on the glory of the 1st MD. [you might see some mention of a 
recruiter in local papers around the time of enlistment if this is true] 

5. He was shanghaied, either at home or while visiting some other city. [NYC was a bad place 
for a healthy looking farm boy to fall asleep- or pass out- in a public place.] The recruiter got his 
bonus no matter how unhappy the new recruit was with his new lodging. 

6. He had a previous enlistment, got sick or was wounded and ended up in Hagerstown in the 
hospital. When he recovered he enlisted in a local regiment. 

7. Here's a real interesting possibility---- Are you sure it was a Union Reg? MD had a 1st Cav, 
CSA; and a 1st Cav Union. If the records you got were pension records, then some confusion 
could be possible. If you got his service record, and he appears on regular 'muster rolls', then it 
would be safe to believe it was the Union Reg't. 
[I think] 

http://home.att.net/~secondmdus/sites.html 
seems to have some good links to help sort that out. 

One of them is Dyer's Compendium, which gives a capsule history of al 
Union Regiments. [and mentions the important dates of their major 
engagements] 
http://www.civilwararchive.com/regim.htm 

If this is any clue, Peter Robarge, 29yo, of Chazy [pronounced *Shay-zee'*, about 100 miles 
north of Queensbury, in Clinton Co] enlisted in the 1st Md Cav in Oct 62 according to the 
Adjutant General's report AO389. He was still in service in Jun 1865. If Queensbury 
newspapers don't shed any light, you could try the plattsburgh papers 
for this guy. 

[interestingly, the only other Robarge in my Clinton County list of 
soldiers from AO389 is a Lewis Robarge who enlisted in the 5th Mass Cav, 
in Aug 61. He died of wounds at 29yo, in Culpepper VA in Mar 64. He 
left a widow, and both parents survived him, but he had no minor 
children. He is buried in Chazy.] 

{{Susi}} Thanks for passing this on. It gives some excellent "little known" 
information. Not many are aware of these types of incidents and they are good to 
know. The responder to this person's query is also very good at tracking this down. 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: GLITZ01 

Dearest Ancestor 
Your tombstone stands among the rest; 
Neglected and alone. 
The name and date are chiseled out 
On polished, marbled stone. 

It reaches out to all who care 
It is too late to mourn. 
You did not know that I exist 
You died and I was born. 

Yet each of us are cells of you 
In flesh, in blood, in bone. 
Our blood contracts and beats a pulse 
Entirely not our own. 

Dear Ancestor, the place you filled 
One hundred years ago 
Spreads out among the ones you left 
Who would have loved you so. 

I wonder if you lived and loved, 
I wonder if you knew 
That someday I would find this spot, 
And come to visit you. 

{{Shirley}} I love it. Thanks for the poem.... 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
From: LYoung144 
Thanks so much for the list of Quantrill's Raiders. I have downloaded it but not checked it. I 
hope I find what I am looking for. 
I am a first time Great Grandma. My Grandson had a baby girl this past Wednesday. She is 
really precious. I am sure that surprises you that I think that. 
I appreciate all of your dedication. That goes for Jayne, Ted and Amy too. Again thanks a lot. 

{{Lorita}} Congratulations Grandma :D Hope you find the ancestor you're looking 
for. And by the way; NO it doesn't surprise us at all that you might think that. LOL 
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by 
talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil 
War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of. 

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it 
so well.

"I think it is a noble and pious thing 
To do whatever we may by written 
Word or molded bronze and sculpted 
Stone to keep our memories, our 
Reverence and our love alive and 
To hand them on to new generations 
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to 
address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth 
(as we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we 
dedicate one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So 
come back and visit; we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a 
full listing of upcoming events, either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the 
Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into 
discussions on this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution 
for this "Weekly Fireside." 

AND AGAIN TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We really "fire up" with what members bring to 
the discussions, and we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire 
to be removed from distribution of this "Weekly Missif," just drop us a line and we will comply 
with your wishes "poste- haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events***** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFH Amy, 
GFS Jayne, GFS TEG and GFS Jim and our many faithful friends :) 

03/30/2000 - OPEN CHAT 

04/06/2000 - Nurse and Spy, the Story of Sarah Edmonds - part of the Women in the Civil 
War Series 

04/13/2000 - "Letters, Songs and Poems Night" - don't forget to send yours in. We'll be sure to 
read them :D 

04/20/2000 - OPEN CHAT 

04/27/2000 - "A Woman Who Was Banished" - the Story of Rose Greenhow - part of the 
Women in the Civil War Series 

We'll See You Thursday Night..! 
Your Joyful, Intelligent and Fun-lovin' Host's/Hostess's :-) 
GFS Jim, GFS Jayne, GFS TEG and GFH Amy

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