March 1999 Weekly Fireside

Hear Ye ..............Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 7 March 1999 - PART 1

We had a great night Thursday with open chat. We had some newcomers and we hope you all enjoyed our Fireside chat. There was some interesting discussion, some good questions and some good information passed out. I was hoping I'd hear from our senior partner with a report on his "travels" but I guess they're keeping him too busy. During the chat, we talked about compiling all OUR Civil War Websites into a complete set so they can be posted in the files library. SOoooo...please send us, GFS Jim, GFS TEG & me, your favorite CW Websites!!!

Ike and Nancy forwarded us a list of Web Sources for Military History by Richard Jensen. It is QUITE extensive and will be uploaded into History Files Library. One site that REALLY caught my eye was < http://www.jatruck.com/stonewall/ > Try it, I guarantee you'll like it!!!!

{{{{{Ike and Nancy}}}}} This is an absolutely incredible list!!!!!!! Mr. Jensen has outdone himself.

As you will notice, this week Fireside is in two parts. There was so much I wanted to include, there was just now way I could get it all to fit in one email... If you inadvertently delete one part, let me know and I'll send it to you.

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This Thursday is our very special Songs, Letters and Poems night. Come on out and join us. If you have any letters, etc you would like to share, please send them to GFS Jim, GFS TEG or me.
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FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE REALLY ENJOYED HAVING
YOU :-)..... COME AGAIN, WE "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY....

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NOTE: The following short stories were written by our very own GFS TEG/Tom Gladwell

PANTY RAID

Toward the evening on July 2, a Confederate officer rode out to the Cunningham farm to tell the owner that the barn would be required for hospital purposes. All night long the wounded were carried in on stretchers and by morning the barn and orchard nearby were filled with Union and Confederate men who had been hurt in and around the wheatfield.

Later in the day, a man came running to the house demanding that Mr. Cunningham give him something red to be used as a hospital flag. The rebels were retreating, he said, and the area would be shelled. A flag would offer some safety to the hospital.

Cunninghams Daughter explains what happened next:
"Father was not a handy man about the house. He opened a drawer and handed out the first thing he touched. It was white, not red, but the haste was great. In a few minutes this white thing was floating from the lightning rod of the barn. When mother came back from Grandfathers this the first spot that caught her eye. A pair of her nether garments gleaming high against the blue sky! And those garments could not, with truth, be called scanties in 1863.

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PRIVATE CHASE'S LONG JOURNEY HOME

Twenty year old John F. Chase, a private in the 5th Maine Battery, was with his unit atop a knoll between Cemetery and Culp's Hills on the evening of July 2, when Louisiana and North Carolina troops assaulted Cemetery hill. He recalls this unusual adventure: "My battery was enfilading the charging column as it dashed up the hill. Our shot, shrapnel, and canister was doing such terrible execution that the Confederates opened three or four batteries on us."

"One of their shrapnel shells exploded near me and 48 pieces of it entered my body. My right arm was shattered and my left eye put out. I was carried a short distance to the rear as dead, and knew nothing more until two days after."

"When I regained consciousness, I was in a wagon with a lot of dead comrades being carted to the trenches to be buried. I moaned and called the attention of the driver, who pulled me up among the dead, and gave me water. He said my first words were: 'Did we win the battle?' "

"I was taken to the First Army Corps hospital on the Isaac Lightner farm, three miles from Gettysburg on the Baltimore Pike. They laid me down beside the barn, where I waited three more days till my wounds were dressed. The surgeon let me lie there to finish dying, as they said, while they attended to the rest of the wounded. I lay on the barn floor then, several days, and was taken into the house, where I stopped for a week. From there I was removed to the Lutheran Theological Seminary Hospital. After about three weeks, I was carried out of the hospital to die again, and was told by the head surgeon that I could not live six hours, but I did not do him the favor. Three months later, I was sent to West Philadelphia Hospital until I was able to return to my home in Augusta, Maine."

NOTE: Chase won the Medal of Honor for his bravery at Chancellorsville, in May 1863.

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THE TWELFTH BATTLE

Just before the Battle of Gettysburg, Sergeant Edward B . Rollins of Company A, 15th Massachusetts Infantry, sent a card to his wife with the name of eleven battles he had fought, beautifully inscribed upon it. He left space for inscribing one more name, and wrote to her that after he had fought his twelfth battle he would be home.
He was killed at Gettysburg on July 2, his twelfth battle.

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THE OLD CRONE

Somewhere along the Baltimore Pike near Culp's Hill, the 3rd Wisconsin infantry noticed an old woman standing on the side of the road, her arms akimbo, resting on her broad hips, and she spoke words of cheer to us such as these: " Dot ish right, poys, go and drive dose fellows off. De has shtole enough around here!" She was the same old cone whom Colonel Morse records that when the 2nd Massachusetts Infantry was moving across the turnpike to the left on the night of July 2nd, while the rebels were yelling like devils incarnated, she said to their men, " Never mind, poys, theyer nothing but Men." She was a woman of superb nerve, and her words amused and encouraged the men in that hour of high excitement.

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TOOTHACHE

Amid all the terrible carnage and suffering that went on during the Battle of Gettysburg, one lieutenant had the ignominious misfortune to suffer a toothache on July 3.
"I received permission to go back to the hospital, to get an ugly tooth extracted that had kept me dancing all the night before. Our Surgeon, Dr. Everett, who had been hard at work all night at the amputation table, made but short work and little ado about one tooth. He laid me on the ground, staddled me, and with a formidable pair of nippers pulled and yanked me around until either the tooth had come out, or my head off. I was glad when the head conquered."
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THE HELP DESK

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files".
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the
New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting
Logs and Newsletters".

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NOTE:... Per Kevin's request, I'm leaving this in the Weekly. He has so graciously given us permission to print his address... Be "gentle" folks... and please... be sure to be as generous with your "donation" as Kevin is being with his time. d:) Excerpt from Kevin's previous note... [...have taken photos for people who sent me request, and mailed them for what small donation they are willing to send to cover my cost as well as my donation to the Museum] AND Folks.... be sure to check out the website Kevin has listed in his note BEFORE you contact him. What you need might be there.

Andersonville lookups
From: frye@gnat.net (FRYE FAMILY)

Hi Jim,
Please include my offer to do lookups and take pics at Andersonville in the Fireside " Chats". My offer has spread like wildfire and surprisingly, I am keeping up with the request pretty well. Most of my responses get answered in a few days and Im getting to Andersonville to take pics every week or two. If you could include the online Andersonville page so researchers can attempt to look up the info on their own, that would help speed things up. If researchers come up empty but have records that their ancesters were there, I have a CD and can cross check names by alphabet to check other spellings of the names. The online address is.....
<< http://www.corinthian.net/mccc/plookup.htm >>

I also have an address and contact at the Andersonville Muesum so that if
their Ancestors are not listed and they do have documents, I will send the
info on request.

Thank you so much and good hunting...

Kevin Frye
Butler Georgia

{{{{{Kevin}}}}} We thank you for your generous offer and we hope the membership doesn't inundate you.

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NOTE: Someone sent me note re Jimcone252's letter... please resend as I inadvertently deleted it.. d:(

From: Jimcone252

Hello to all:
I am a newcomer to the group and for the past several weeks, I
have read your news articles and other types of articles with great interest.
I am the great-grandson of a Confederate Navy Veteran who was aboard the
Gun Boat Spray that protected the St. Marks River, just South of Tallahassee
Fla. They kept the Union Navy from landing Soldiers at the strategic points
in an effort to capture the State Capitol. When that effort failed, they landed
approximately 5,000 Union Soldiers on the East Bank of the St. Marks River
and made an effort to cross at Natural Bridge. This effort failed when the
CSA managed to raise a mere 500 young cadets, a few seasoned soldiers
and many infirm who were in the hospital at Tallahassee. The Union suffered
losses of 2,000 of their men while the CSA lost only 5. Of these five, one of
them was a relative of my family.
If anyone can add to this story, I would certainly love to discuss this with you.
I can only add, if the determination and bravery of these 500 men were
consistent throughout the war, things would definitely turned out different
than they did.
By the way, the ole Spray did her duty to keep the big boys from coming
up the St. Marks and the State Capitol at Tallahassee was the only Capitol
East of the Mississippi that was not captured! Bravo!

{{{{Jim}}}} We're just tickled to death to have you "on board". We're posting your note here in the Fireside in hopes that there will be someone out there who can help you.

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NOTE: I meant to put this in last week's Weekly Fireside because of all the questions regarding "picking lint" after Jim read the first section but it didn't make it. Better late than never. Enjoy!!!!

PICKING LINT
J. W. Barker
Plying the busy fingers
Over the vestments old,
Not with the weary needle,
Not for some grains of gold;
Thinking of fainting heroes,
Out in the dreary night,
Smitten in Freedom's battle,
First in the gallant fight --CHORUS:

O, bright are the jewels from love's deep mint,
God bless the fingers while picking the lint,
God bless the fingers while picking the lint.
Quicker, the blood is flowing,
Hundreds were slain today,
And every warm pulsation
Is stealing life away.
"A hundred threads a minute,
A hundred drops of gore,"
The sad and thrilling measures
We've never learned before
-- CHORUS:

The shadows are weaving a silver tint,
God bless the fingers while picking the lint,
God bless the fingers while picking the lint.
We've clad the fallen heroes
With garments we have made,
By light we now are picking,
The fearful tide be stayed;
We lift our hearts to Heaven,
Our Father's blessings crave,
Behold our smitten country,
O bless the fallen brave
--CHORUS:

O, bright are the jewels from love's deep mint,
God bless the fingers while picking the lint,
God bless the fingers while picking the lint.

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From: Doie1208

Thanks so much for forwarding me "The Weekly Fireside." I enjoy reading it so much. Hope some day I can contribute, too. Keep it coming!

{{{{{Doie}}}}} We're tickled to death to send you the Weekly Fireside and hope you can join us "in person" some Thursday night 11 PM ET in the Golden Gates room


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CONTINUED IN PART 2...........

Hear Ye ..............Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 7 March 1999
CONTINUED - PART 2

MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!

Well here it is! In response to overwhelming number of emails indicating this to be a great idea, we have responded in kind..... Here's how it works.. If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or
battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will post it here... Other members seeing your request and being in the near vicinity, and are willing to assist can email you direct (this protects your privacy) and work out the details. We recommend the "Requestor" pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free" assistance between members. Do unto others as........ you know :-) Keep me posted on how this is working!!!!
GFS Jim
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PICTURES OF THE GRAVESITE OF Edwin Nichols at the New Hope Battfield Cemetery are requested
by Lkiwki@aol.com ..... If anyone can assist in this, please email this member direct and work out any
details or additional information. Lynne, if you hit paydirt, let me know and I'll remove this posting.

The New Hope Battlefield is just off (North ?) of US Hwy 278 about 25 miles northwest of Atlanta,
Georgia. Towns close or fairly close are Dallas, New Hope, Kennesaw, Braswell, Marietta.
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From: Wmdperkins
In connection with the Civil War Newsletter I am requesting assistance with the following:
On the Stone there reads the following:

Daniel RUGGLES
1/1810 - 6/2/1897
Lt. Col., USA
Maj. Gen., CSA

Edward S. RUGGLES
7/10/1843 - 3/1/1919
Maj., USA ......................(is this an error????)

Richardetta Mason HOOE
11/19/1821 - 1/4/1904

The gravesite is in the Confederate Cemetery, Fredricksburg, Va., corner of Amelia St., and
Washington St., north of the entrance road, stone is said to be "quite handsome". This is listed in
"Tombstone Inscriptions of Spotsylvania Co., Va." written by Margaret C. Klein, printed Palm Coast,
Fla., 1893. The text is stored in the NC State Archives, Raleigh, NC.
I am interested in any corrections to what is written on the stone as another source has son as a
Maj., CSA. Also, what other data the cemetery might have, and, of course, a picture of the stone would be
greatly appreciated. I have 1870, 80, and 1900 Fredricksburg, Va., census info on Daniel and
Richardetta, she a US pensioner in 1900.
Thank you for your efforts - Bill Perkins

"Bill" we'll put this out in the Newsletter and see what the readers will say...... :-)

NOTE: I received the following from Bill this week....

I just received a huge packet of printed information from the Michigan Historical Specialist concerning Brig Gen Daniel RUGGLES and his family (including info on his wife Richardetta Mason HOOE) and her family. This RUGGLES is one of many distant lines that I have followed because of the interesting events and ancestors it contains. I will share any of this wealth of information with anyone who is interested and will send a full copy of the testament as requested.

The HOOE family was aparently a very old and highly respected Virginia family.

RUGGLES was b in Barre, Mass, grad USMA 1833, served three wars, two for USA, one for CSA. Rather illustrious military carreer, inventor too, held patents.

The material includes copies of his last will and testament, handwritten; a testament published upon his death in the Daily Star, Fredricksburg, Va. (4+ pages on 8 1/2 X 11) which was written by a very old and terribly close compatriot, excerpts are as follows (some of the data is not quite correct):

"Descended from a noble and Distinguished English ancestry who held high civil and military positions from the reign of Edward the First, and fought under the Lion Hearted Richard in the Holy Land. ............................Gen RUGGLES married Miss Richardetta HOOE, of that old and influential family in King George Co., Va., whose three brothers died fighting the battles of their country, a niece of George Mason, of Gunston Hall, the author of the Virginia Bill of Rights. .......
Throughout this long, arduous, and brilliant career he was noted for skill in strategy, wisdom in counsel, and heroic daring in action.
In our city, in which he has lived since the close of the war, you cannot find a man or woman of any color who did not bow with reverence before our "grand old man".
In an age material, practical, utilitarian, "when every door is barred with gold and opens but to golden keys," such lives as those of Lee, Ruggles, and the Confederate dead, who gave life for liberty (the "noble army of Martyrs") such a life, and death, measured by the yardstick of post bellum commerce, must seem a miserable failure. Not so, we hope and believe, will it appear to our children's children; for liberty, right, and truth are indeed but words, but words are things, and these represent the high ideals of our common humanity.................
Let me speak a few earnest, true words about my honored chief and very dear friend. (the writer is Maj J. Horace Lacey, Chief of Staff to Gen RUGGLES during the WBTS) He was not only an ideal soldier, but a "man of affairs" and capable of administering a department and in a time of revolution and war he was one of the few I have known who could lay, broad and deep, the foundations of a State that should be both a fortress and a temple. His scientific attainments were of the highest.
I am standing by his open grave, stars silent above, graves silent beneath, silence and tears are the language of sorrow. Then let me say one word for my venerated and honored friend, with no loud and boastful utterance, as to his family or his own well-earned fame. He was the noblest work of God--an honest man. He was the most polite and courteous gentleman it has been my privilege to know. The Trinity in unity, before which his soul bowed in adoration, seemed to be Liberty, Truth, and Woman. "Knightliest of a knightly race," he taught the proud Virginia cavalier that New England could claim a Brahmin stock; the peer of anything humanity has offered as a proof .......
...........He whom we mourn full of years and honors, was in his eight-eighth year. Humble and reverent before his God, but not consorting with the Scribes and Pharisees. He said to me cheerfully and calmly on what he knew was his death bed: "Major, I hear the roll call, and withour fear I answer the summons of our Great Commander." ..........
And now we leave the aged warrior, hero in three great wars, to "the Peace of God which passeth all understanding."
Oh, honored chief and cherished friend, the time has come to thee, which cometh alike to all, when the warrior's crown, and the statesman's civic wreath, alike shall wither at the touch of death; but this humble garland I bind with loving hand upon thy dead brow shall bloom in immortal freshness, watered by the pious tears of a grateful people, and thy home and fame will survive the injuries of time, and be forever honored in the recollection of Him, "To Whom the memory of the just is precious." "

If only this could be said of all men.

Bill

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Subj: Locating a grave..
From: Scotlinda

I would be interested in getting a picture of the grave of my husband's gg grandfather, ROBERT
SYLVESTER, he served with the 15th Infantry Regiment Company E from NJ. The information I have is
that he is buried in the National Cemetery in Fredricksburg, VA. Division B, Section D, Grave 306. He
died December 5, 1862, of typhoid fever shortly after mustering in on August 25th, 1862.
Thanks so much for any help..of course I will pay costs for film and mailing.
Carolee Logan

{{{Carolee}}} We'll put it up and see what hits we get....

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Subj: 35th GAR
From: SkipLane@compuserve.com (Myra E. Lane)

Hello Jim:

Ike Watrous recommended that I pose the following question to your
knowledgeable Chat Room:

Can anyone help me to identify the following gentleman whose name could be
Gould, Vreeland or Post from New Jersey.

In a wonderful old photo, this uniformed gentleman wears a large brimmed
hat with an emblem comprised of laurel branches encircling 3 letters, the
central one could be an 'A,' with the number '35' at the top. Near the left
pocket of his single breasted jacket is a star-shaped medal suspended from
a (striped?) ribbon attached to an eagle at the top. He also wears what
looks like a braided mourning band on his left arm and holds a dark colored
cane topped with a white handle. The collar of his uniform is hidden by his
long beard but the top button is high on his chest suggesting the coat has
no lapels. The coat has 3 metal buttons over a vest with 6 smaller medal
buttons visible.

He most likely came from the Newfoundland-West Milford area of northern New
Jersey for his photo was among those in an album of these families dating
from between 1860-1910. I am more than willing to share a .gif image with
anyone who would be interested. My objective is to place the original photo
with a legitimate descendant of this man once identified or an interested
organization unless I find he is my own ancestor.

Any help your group can provide will be greatly appreciated.

Kind regards,
Myra Vreeland Lane

{{{{{Myra}}}}} We have about 850 on our distribution... hopefully one of them can help you.

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From: Leftyvs

I keep reading about the cemetery photo exchange every week. Sounds like a good plan but what if you have a Union ancestor who died of disease in a Jackson, Mississippi hospital & was buried as best as could be at the time. Where would he be buried? Does anyone know if there is a Civil War Cemetery in Mississippi? I have a lot of research to do on this yet. Any knowledge out there? I enjoy reading the newsletter.
Vicki

{{{{{Vicki}}}}} I'll put your question to the rest of our ever growing group... Can any of you folk from Mississippi help Vicki???

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of
Interest and Pleas for HELP................

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From: NEVassau

FRIENDSHIP

There's a miracle called friendship
That dwells in the heart
You don't know how it happens
Or when it gets its start
But you know the special lift
It always brings
And you realize that Friendship
Is God's most precious gift!

It's National Friendship Week
Friends are very rare jewels, indeed.
They make you smile and encourage you to succeed.
They lend an ear, they share a word of praise, and
they always want to open their hearts to us.

Show your friends how much you care.....
Send this to everyone you consider a FRIEND.
If it comes back to you, then you'll know you have a friend for life.
Send this to everyone whom you consider a friend, even the person who
sent this to you. Show your friends how much you appreciate them and
what
they mean to you.........

Happy Friendship Week!!!

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Jayne, Jim, Tom And Fireside Chatters

I am excitedly busy planning a battlefield hop through the South for sometime this summer (deferred from last year when I had eye problems and on tap this year only if situation improves but a lady has to have hope, right?)

I would be interested in anyone sending me information, or telling me, about particular battlefields besides the biggies that they have visited and that are interesting sites. As well as places to stay, things to look for, etc. I have purchased a couple of reference books - Lawless' Civil War Sourcebook, A Traveler's Guide and another detailing battles in each state. Using them as planners.

I am starting off from home in Oklahoma thru Arkansas with a stop at Arkansas Post. From there I will probably do a circle tour of Tennessee, Alabama and Mississippi. although I am strongly tempted to head on to 'Virginia [where I already have visited major sites but would like perhaps to do some of the lesser ones and where I also have a granddaughter and a darling great-grandbaby to visit).

And I love taking the back roads, getting on superhighways only when I need to make time.

But -- I have been so intrigued by Tom's Gettysburg stories and accounts (I hafta to find that covered bridge!) that I may extend three or four days and go that far tool But oh man! that is a lot of driving! A month? Do I have a month?

I have a good 35 mm Canon as well as a digital camera and video, so I could also take pictures for anyone. But hold that for now.

Mainly, I need help in preparing a route. I want to go to Shiloh, Chickamauga, Tunnel Hill for sure. I will bum around Vicksburg at least a couple of days again to continue my search into Adams' cavalry movements. I think I will dip along Mobile Bay and Cottonelle where my great-grandfather was captured after Appomatox.

But you get the idea. Any suggestions and must-sees appreciated.
I am starting a file for suggestions -- JRose10700@aol.com

If I may, I will mention this from time to time on the "free time" during scheduled chat.

love
joan

{{{{{Joan}}}}} Thanks for the terrific trip schedule... you don't have any room for an extra person do you OK FOLKS... HERE'S YOUr CHANCE TO TELL JOAN OF YOUR FAVORITE CIVIL WAR "MUST SEE"!!!!

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From: FI WATROUS

Immigrants through Ellis Island

Did you know that only 2nd class and below tickets went
through Ellis Island? First class ticket holders went to the South
Street Seaport. If you can't find them in Ellis, look there.

NOTE: The following from GFS Carol is in regard to the above item...

Here is some more little known information.

The U.S. Immigrant Receiving Station in New York was located in various places, but Ellis Island itself did NOT open for business until 1 Jan 1892.

If you have ancestors who came through Ellis Island (or so they say) in 1891 (which I found out that Ellis Island was temporarily closed so they must have been filtered through "The Barge").

As you will note in this paragraph, what I am trying to say is that my ancestors like a lot of others, found it easiest to say that they came through Ellis Island, but my research had already uncovered that they did not in fact come through Ellis Island, because it was closed at that time. That is why I stated that they must have come through the "Barge" office.

The chronology given by John Philip Colletta in his book, _They Came in Ships_ for the U.S. Immigrant Receiving Station in New York is as follows:

Castle Garden: 1 Aug 1855 - mid-Apr 1890
Barge Office: mid-April 1890 - 31 Dec 1891
Ellis Island: 1 Jan 1892 - 13 Jun 1897

There was a major fire on Ellis Island on 13 Jun 1897 which almost entirely destroyed the immigration buildings, so the Barge Office, at the southern most tip of Manhattan Island was again pressed into use.
Barge Office: 14 Jun 1897 - 16 Dec 1900
Ellis Island: 17 Dec 1900 - late 1954

Everyone should be aware of this chronology and exercise caution in claiming that an ancestor arrived at "Ellis Island." Even many immigrants who arrived after 1 Jan 1892 did NOT arrive at Ellis Island.

So now you desperately want the passenger manifest info that can only be gotten after knowing the name of the ship and the exact date since "The Barge" is unindexed at the National Archives!

The lack of an index for the Port of New York is not unique to the Barge Office. New York records, for various reasons, were not indexed, for the most part, between 1847 and 1897.

You need to do some homework to locate naturalization records. Either declarations of intent or final papers may give (at a minimum) the date and port of arrival. Some records also mention the name of the ship.

Carol

{{{{{Ike, Nancy and Carol}}}}} Thanks for the information. This will mean a whole lot to alot of people.
NOTE: If you are on AOL, you can click the following link, for the rest of you, I've included the URL also The American Immigrant Wall of Honor
http://www.wallofhonor.com/

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From: TDonoho528

Greetings. I am glad you were able to put me on your list. I have been sent many firesides by my cousin, Janet Johnson. I wish to share one incident I experienced recently. I attended the memorial service for Davil O. Dodd. It was cold and that kept the crowd down but that not stop a great unit of reenactors from doing a wonderful job. Young Mr. Dodd was hanged for spying at 17. He was given the medal of honor of the conf posthumously. They believe he was the first recipient of that medal. Jerry Russell of the round table group gave a very nce explanation. Since retirement, i have looked harder to find the last bits of a non homogenized americana. Thanks for allowing me to join your group. I will try for Thurs but have many conflicts then but will look forward to firesides. Thank You Jerry Donoho

{{{{{Jerry}}}}} We're pleased as punch to have you with us and we'll be looking for you at the fireside.

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From: GLITZ01
Have you ever heard of the "BUTTERMILK RANGERS" that served in the Civil war. John Myrick
Montgomery was supposed to have served in this unit and it was probably a rifle unit. Shirley

{{{Shirley}}} We'll leave this in for another week... ANY OF YOU UNIT EXPERTS
OUT THERE HEARD OF UNIT ABOVE??????

NOTE: Shirley reports she hasn't gotten any answers on this yet....

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From: GFH JimmA

I was researching in Bradford Co PA for my Avery ancestors. Bradford Co is combined with Tioga Co PA and Chemung Co NY and the Chemung Co page has a listing of all prisoners from Elmira POW Camp buried in National Cemetery there in Elmira. Also an interesting history of the camp. Also has a photgraph or two of the National Cemetery. Joyce Tice does a wonderful job with web pages. Here is url http://www.rootsweb.com/~nychemun/chemweb.htm. The link to the POW page is right in middle of this page. Prisoners who are buried there are listed alphabetically with their units.

National Cemetery is called Woodlawn. It is right next to a private cemetery also called Woodlawn. My grandfather is buried there with his first wife. Their daughter and her husband and their son and his wife are there too. Also of more note Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain) and his family are buried in the private cemetery too.

Jim Avery

{{{{{Jim}}}}} Thanks so much for the heads up... I know there are some folk who will rush right to that URL...
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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT………….

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War".

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died
because of.

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate
one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit;
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events,
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly
Fireside."

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :)

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste-
haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events******

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFS Jim, GFS TEG
and GFS Jayne and our many faithful friends :)

3/4/99 - OPEN CHAT

3/11/99 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. Don't forget to send in any that you would like shared....
These are great evenings. These are indeed special evenings.

3/18/99 - OPEN CHAT

3/25/99 - "Gettysburg Night - Part III - stories and tales collected over the years by GFS TEG (our own
Tom :-)) Yes, there are more :)

.............and that take's us to the end of the month of March.

We'll See You Thursday Night……….!
Your Hosts
GFS Jim, GFS TEG and GFS Jayne

Hear Ye ..............Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending March 14, 1999 

If you missed last Thursday's Songs, Letters, and Poems night you really missed a good one!!!!! We had quite an appreciative group there. There were lots of good things shared and everyone was in good voice for the songs. We probably even had a few neighborhood dogs singing with us.
Jim is still "on the road" and his paying job is keeping him quite busy... he said the 10 and 12 hour days don't leave much time for anything else. I also received a note from him after Thursday night's SIG apologizing for "dropping out" of the room. Seems he lost his connection with AOL and couldn't get back on. He had asked that I tell everyone "Goodbye" for him but by the time I knew I had mail, we had locked the doors and gone home.
We asked last week that you share your favorite Civil War Websites with us... I've received two... Now, with nearly 850 on the distribution list, there has to be more than two favorite sites. Send them in to GFS Jim, GFS TEG or me and we will compile a complete list and share them with everyone.

**************
This Thursday is Open Chat. Come on out and join us. If you have any questions, this is the night to get them answered.

**************
FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE REALLY ENJOYED HAVING
YOU :-)..... COME AGAIN, WE "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY....

*************************************************************************************

In tribute to St. Patrick's Day, I've included the following story from GFS TEG. We were talking about the Irish Brigade one day and he wrote the following from his research notes. This is what he wrote:

Thanks Sis for getting me talking and thinking of the Irish Brigade, This story is for You and my Irish ancestors and the Brave men of the IRISH BRIGADE.
Tom

William Corby: The Pride of The Irish Brigade

During the Civil War, thousands of young men eagerly joined in the four-year fight for various reasons. Some believed in preserving the Union, others were for secession, some fought for or against slavery. Many, however, thought they were embarking on a glorious adventure, thrilled to be away from home to escape the watchful eyes of their parents. Clergymen in the army filled that void left by mothers and fathers, a constant reminder of duty and guilt when times were dull and grim reminders of death during battles. Few were appreciated, many were ignored, some were even despised. Father William Corby was one of the handful of religious men whose influence can still be felt, whose life was truly useful and appreciated on and off the Battlefield.

William Corby was born in Detroit, Michigan on October 2, 1833. His father Daniel, was an Irish immigrant, his mother Elizabeth, was Canadian. Not much is known about William's childhood, except that his father was a devoted Catholic, often donating large sums of money anonymously to the church and poor of the community. Daniel Corby was a wealthy man, a real estate dealer, and for a time William worked with his father in the business. Then William attended Notre Dame in 1853, a fledging university in nearby South Bend, Indiana. There he became the protege of Father Sorin, Notre Dame's founder and president. It was perhaps Sorin's influence that caused the young Corby to make the church his profession. William, under Sorin's tutelage, prepared for the priesthood, taking his vows in 1860.

Other events were transpiring in 1860 that would forever alter Corby's life. Secession carried to the end of the year after the election of Abraham Lincoln to the Presidency. Father Sorin, though a staunch Unionist, insisted that Notre Dame remain neutral. But, when the war commenced in 1861, priests from Sorin's diocese were sent to serve the Union as chaplains. Father Corby headed east in the fall of 1861 to serve as chaplain for the 88th New York.

It is not known if Father Corby was immediately accepted by the regiment, but before long he had the respect of the men he served. Corby was benevolent with a lighthearted sense of humor and he endured the hardships of army life side by side with the enlisted men. The 88th New York Volunteers were mostly Irish immigrants from New York City, part of the Irish Brigade. They were rapidly earning a reputation for fighting, and were almost always thrown into the hottest part of the contest. Father Corby, unlike other Chaplains, willingly braved the front lines in order to administer to the wounded and dying of the 88th New York, often helping out in other regiments as well. Many letters survive that attest to his calm presence in the whirlwind of battle. He stood near the Bloody Lane at Sharpsburg, at Marye's Heights in Fredericksburg, and witnessed the panicked rout of the Union 11th Corps at Chancellorsville. "A panic has a strange effect on men," he later wrote, "precisely as when it enters a herd of cattle."
It was during the Battle of Gettysburg, though, where Father Corby's mark became indelible upon the page of history. In the early afternoon of July 2, 1863, men of the Union Third Corps suddenly vacated their position to the left of the Union Second Corps on Cemetery Ridge. The Irishmen watched in amazement as the troops left the Union lines for a Wheatfield and a Peach Orchard far ahead, the peril they were entering obvious to the men from Erin.

As the battle commenced that afternoon, the men of the Third Corps under General Dan Sickles, were overrun by the Confederate forces. General Hancock, who commanded the Union Second corps, ordered Caldwell's Division which included the Irish Brigade, into the fray to hold the line and keep Sickles' men from being annihilated.

Father Corby was concerned about his men. "They had had absolutely no chance to practice their religious duties during the past two or three weeks, being constantly on the march," he said. He knew many of the Brigade would not come back alive. In his memoirs, Father Corby states that he asked the commanding officer (which most historians agree was Colonel Patrick Kelly of the Irish Brigade, not Hancock) if he could briefly address the men. Permission granted, Corby then stood on a large rock and urged the men to do their duty, reminding them of the sacred nature of their trust as soldiers. He then gave a general absolution, promising all that were within the sound of his voice that if they were contrite and made their country, and their God proud, their sins would be forgiven.

"My eye covered thousands of officers and men…That general absolution was intended for all… not only for our brigade, but for all, North and South, who were susceptible of it and who were about to appear before their Judge." Corby's speech impressed all who heard it, from the lowest private to General Hancock, who reverently removed his hat during the benediction. One officer of the Irish Brigade later remarked that "the scene was more than impressive; it was awe inspiring."

Today a memorial to Father Corby stands near the spot where he gave Absolution at Gettysburg, the only monument to a chaplain on the battlefield, dedicated in 1910. An identical statue of the beloved priest graces the University of Notre Dame, where Father Corby attended as a youth, and where he served as president after the war.

William Corby died on December 28, 1897, of pneumonia. A man of service all his life, his memory is etched in modern minds as the priest who crossed religious barriers and lines of loyalty on a hot July afternoon in 1863, near a field of wheat in a small Pennsylvania town called Gettysburg.

{{{{{Tom (lil' brother)}}}}} Thank you so much for sending this to me and allowing me to share it with the "faithful"

*************************************************************************************

THE HELP DESK

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files".
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the
New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting
Logs and Newsletters".

*****************************************************************************
NOTE:... Per Kevin's request, I'm leaving this in the Weekly. He has so graciously given us permission to print his address... Be "gentle" folks... and please... be sure to be as generous with your "donation" as Kevin is being with his time. d:) Excerpt from Kevin's previous note... [...have taken photos for people who sent me request, and mailed them for what small donation they are willing to send to cover my cost as well as my donation to the Museum] AND Folks.... be sure to check out the website Kevin has listed in his note BEFORE you contact him. What you need might be there.

Andersonville lookups
From: frye@gnat.net (FRYE FAMILY)

Hi Jim,
Please include my offer to do lookups and take pics at Andersonville in the Fireside " Chats". My offer has spread like wildfire and surprisingly, I am keeping up with the request pretty well. Most of my responses get answered in a few days and Im getting to Andersonville to take pics every week or two. If you could include the online Andersonville page so researchers can attempt to look up the info on their own, that would help speed things up. If researchers come up empty but have records that their ancesters were there, I have a CD and can cross check names by alphabet to check other spellings of the names. The online address is.....
<< http://www.corinthian.net/mccc/plookup.htm >>

I also have an address and contact at the Andersonville Muesum so that if
their Ancestors are not listed and they do have documents, I will send the
info on request.

Thank you so much and good hunting...

Kevin Frye
Butler Georgia

{{{{{Kevin}}}}} We thank you for your generous offer and we hope the membership doesn't inundate you.

*********************************************************************************
NOTE: Someone sent me note re Jimcone252's letter... please resend as I inadvertently deleted it.. d:(

From: Jimcone252

Hello to all:
I am a newcomer to the group and for the past several weeks, I
have read your news articles and other types of articles with great interest.
I am the great-grandson of a Confederate Navy Veteran who was aboard the
Gun Boat Spray that protected the St. Marks River, just South of Tallahassee
Fla. They kept the Union Navy from landing Soldiers at the strategic points
in an effort to capture the State Capitol. When that effort failed, they landed
approximately 5,000 Union Soldiers on the East Bank of the St. Marks River
and made an effort to cross at Natural Bridge. This effort failed when the
CSA managed to raise a mere 500 young cadets, a few seasoned soldiers
and many infirm who were in the hospital at Tallahassee. The Union suffered
losses of 2,000 of their men while the CSA lost only 5. Of these five, one of
them was a relative of my family.
If anyone can add to this story, I would certainly love to discuss this with you.
I can only add, if the determination and bravery of these 500 men were
consistent throughout the war, things would definitely turned out different
than they did.
By the way, the ole Spray did her duty to keep the big boys from coming
up the St. Marks and the State Capitol at Tallahassee was the only Capitol
East of the Mississippi that was not captured! Bravo!

Jim, I'm leaving this in again in hopes that the person who sent the info that I deleted my mistake will resend it..

*********************************************************************************

MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!

Well here it is! In response to overwhelming number of emails indicating this to be a great idea, we have
responded in kind..... Here's how it works.. If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or
battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will
post it here... Other members seeing your request and being in the near vicinity, and are willing to assist
can email you direct (this protects your privacy) and work out the details. We recommend the "Requestor"
pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free"
assistance between members. Do unto others as........ you know :-) Keep me posted on how this is
working!!!!
GFS Jim
***********************************************
PICTURES OF THE GRAVESITE OF Edwin Nichols at the New Hope Battfield Cemetery are requested
by Lkiwki@aol.com ..... If anyone can assist in this, please email this member direct and work out any
details or additional information. Lynne, if you hit paydirt, let me know and I'll remove this posting.

The New Hope Battlefield is just off (North ?) of US Hwy 278 about 25 miles northwest of Atlanta,
Georgia. Towns close or fairly close are Dallas, New Hope, Kennesaw, Braswell, Marietta.
##########################
Subj: Locating a grave..
From: Scotlinda

I would be interested in getting a picture of the grave of my husband's gg grandfather, ROBERT
SYLVESTER, he served with the 15th Infantry Regiment Company E from NJ. The information I have is
that he is buried in the National Cemetery in Fredricksburg, VA. Division B, Section D, Grave 306. He
died December 5, 1862, of typhoid fever shortly after mustering in on August 25th, 1862.
Thanks so much for any help..of course I will pay costs for film and mailing.
Carolee Logan

{{{Carolee}}} We'll put it up and see what hits we get....
#####################
Subj: 35th GAR
From: SkipLane@compuserve.com (Myra E. Lane)

Hello Jim:

Ike Watrous recommended that I pose the following question to your
knowledgeable Chat Room:

Can anyone help me to identify the following gentleman whose name could be
Gould, Vreeland or Post from New Jersey.

In a wonderful old photo, this uniformed gentleman wears a large brimmed
hat with an emblem comprised of laurel branches encircling 3 letters, the
central one could be an 'A,' with the number '35' at the top. Near the left
pocket of his single breasted jacket is a star-shaped medal suspended from
a (striped?) ribbon attached to an eagle at the top. He also wears what
looks like a braided mourning band on his left arm and holds a dark colored
cane topped with a white handle. The collar of his uniform is hidden by his
long beard but the top button is high on his chest suggesting the coat has
no lapels. The coat has 3 metal buttons over a vest with 6 smaller medal
buttons visible.

He most likely came from the Newfoundland-West Milford area of northern New
Jersey for his photo was among those in an album of these families dating
from between 1860-1910. I am more than willing to share a .gif image with
anyone who would be interested. My objective is to place the original photo
with a legitimate descendant of this man once identified or an interested
organization unless I find he is my own ancestor.

Any help your group can provide will be greatly appreciated.

Kind regards,
Myra Vreeland Lane

{{{{{Myra}}}}} We have about 850 on our distribution... hopefully one of them can help you.

***********************************************************************************

From: Leftyvs

I keep reading about the cemetery photo exchange every week. Sounds like a good plan but what if you have a Union ancestor who died of disease in a Jackson, Mississippi hospital & was buried as best as could be at the time. Where would he be buried? Does anyone know if there is a Civil War Cemetery in Mississippi? I have a lot of research to do on this yet. Any knowledge out there? I enjoy reading the newsletter.
Vicki

{{{{{Vicki}}}}} I've already forwarded FAD33's note to you... but we'll leave your note in to see if anyone else has any other suggestions. Can any of you folk from Mississippi help Vicki???
-------------------
From: FAD33

This is in relation to Vicki's question about an ancestor who died in Mississippi of a disease. There is a huge Union Cemetery at Vicksburg in the National Park. Unfortunately, when the bodies of Union dead were brought into the cemetery in 1865-66, the wooden markers of their graves were no longer readable. Therefore, the majority of the graves of Union veterans are marked "unknown". Unless Vicki gets in touch with the Mississippi Funeral Home Association to find out if there was a funeral home operating in Jackson at the time of her ancestor's death, I do not know how she will find his grave. Perhaps Vicki might want to contact the State Archives for information.

Frances Ann

************************************************************************************
From: CayugaMAD

Request for direction.

I am looking for someone who will share information on how to find a Livingston County Illinois ancestor who was an infantry soldier in the Civil War. I know he served, I am having difficulty finding his regiment. I desire documentation, leads for other research, and to know if he may have been transferred to Fort Scott during or after the Civil War. He died in 1871 very near Fort Scott, Kansas.

Myron

{{{{{Myron}}}}} Many state and county historical societies have books listing the men who served in the Civil War. You may want to contact the Odell Historical and Genealogical Society, Box 82, Odell, IL 60460 and don't forget to include as SASE with your inquiry.
************************************************************************************

From: Wmdperkins

Hi

Thanks for posting the info on Daniel RUGGLES, I am surprised that there has been no response, Especially in light of the fact that we just discovered that he was the commanding officer at Aquia Creek, Va, first engagement of the Civil War. One of his sons, Edward RUGGLES, grad Annapolis, was on his staff at that time.

Also, Edward was one of the men who rowed J Wilkes Booth across the river after the Ford Theatre incident. :(

You have printed it in a number of the newsletters, so I would ask that you give my space to someone else.

Our RUGGLES List is engaged in group projects. One just begun is the collating of all the RUGGLES who served in any military. Do you know of any other surname lists who might be doing likewise?

Really enjoying the info

Bill

{{{{{Bill}}}}} I'm a bit surprised too that you haven't heard anything, but maybe this note will "trigger" a response!

*********************************************************************************

A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of
Interest and Pleas for HELP................

************************************************************************************

From: GLITZ01
Have you ever heard of the "BUTTERMILK RANGERS" that served in the Civil war. John Myrick
Montgomery was supposed to have served in this unit and it was probably a rifle unit. Shirley

{{{Shirley}}} We'll leave this in for another week... ANY OF YOU UNIT EXPERTS
OUT THERE HEARD OF UNIT ABOVE??????

NOTE: Shirley reports she hasn't gotten any answers on this yet....

*************************************************************************************

NOTE: VFTurner2 sent me the following:

From: Linda Stevens

HI,
I have in my possession the civil war pension record of WILLIAM GAULT of Bucks
Co. PA.. According to the record he was married to a ELIZA LITHGOW, who died
11/8/1879.

In the record one daughter is mentioned, HESTER GAULT.

As this man doesn't seem to be linked to my GAULT line, I would be more than
happy to give this record to a relative. I would only ask for copy costs and
postage.

Anybody who might be interested can contact me about it.

Linda

{{{{{Vern}}}}} Thanks so much for forwarding this. I hope we can locate the relative!!!

*********************************************************************************


From: SusiCP
To: GFS Jayne, GFS Jim, GFS TEG

Thankyou all a great big hard working news group. HUGS God Bless SusiCP

{{{{{Susi}}}}} WOW, do you ever know how to "make a person's day"!!!! It's this kind of comment that keeps us doing what we do and makes us want to try even harder. THANKS God Bless you too lady... and HUGS right back at ya!!!!

*********************************************************************************

The following was also sent by SusiCP

From: adco@rmi.net (Bob Huddleston) thru the ANDERSONVILLE-L@rootsweb.com

Marvel is the newest and best book on Andersonville.

A man named Fitch wrote a small book on Andersonville a few years back that is also good.

In addition, William B. Hesseltine wrote _Civil War Prisons: A Study in War
Psychology_ back in the thirties which is still the best book on the PW system, both
North and South. It is available in a new hardback printing for $29.95. Hesseltine
also edited a special issue of _Civil War History_, which is a quarterly scholarly
magazine. That is separately available for $10. It consist of a half dozen articles on
various specific prisons.

You can get both from Morningside Books (800-648-9710).

Finally, Marvel has some warnings about published prison diaries. While no CW prison was a country club, and Andersonville was *very* bad, take *any* of the diaries with a grain of salt: the men who published them were trying to get pensions and much of the detail is flat out incorrect! As a check, do you really think guys sat around writing daily diary entries while they were starving at Andersonville?

Bob Huddleston

{{{{{Susi}}}}} You sure do come up with some "goodies"

*********************************************************************************

The following came from the Ancestry Daily Newsletter:

Missouri Confederate Death Records

Although Missouri remained a part of the United States during the American
Civil War, many military units formed within the state fought for the
southern cause. This list, originally published in the "St. Louis Republic"
in the spring of 1895, reveals important information regarding many of
these volunteers. Researchers will find the soldier's name, place of
residence, location and/or cause of death, and death date. Containing over
1,700 names, this collection can be useful in finding Missourian ancestors
who died in the Civil War.

Bibliography: Weant, Kenneth. "Missouri Confederate Deaths." Orem, UT:
Ancestry, Inc., 1999.

To search this database, go to:
http://www.ancestry.com/ancestry/search/3697.htm

*********************************************************************************

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT………….

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War".

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died
because of.

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate
one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit;
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events,
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly
Fireside."

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :)

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste-
haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events******

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFS Jim, GFS TEG
and GFS Jayne and our many faithful friends :)

3/18/99 - OPEN CHAT - heh, heh, heh Today is the Wedding Anniversay of GFS Jim and his "Honey"........ {{{{{{Jimmy & Sherri}}}}}} CONGRATULATIONS!!!

3/25/99 - "Gettysburg Night - Part III - stories and tales collected over the years by GFS TEG (our own Tom :-)) Yes, there are more :)

4/1/99 - OPEN CHAT

4/8/99 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. Don't forget to send in any that you would like shared....
These are great evenings. These are indeed special evenings.

4/15/99 - OPEN CHAT

4/22/99 - "Gettysburg Night - Part IV - stories and tales collected over the years by GFS TEG (our own Tom :-)) Yes, there are more :)

4/29/99 - TO BE ANNOUNCED

.............and that take's us to the end of the month of April.

We'll See You Thursday Night……….!
Your Hosts
GFS Jim, GFS TEG and GFS Jayne

Hear Ye ..............Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending March 21, 1999

What a night we had Thursday!!!! Jim joined us again from Shreveport LA. JRose10700 asked Jim if he'd had any gumbo yet... quite a discussion ensued!!! There was talk of mudbugs, crawdads, shrimp, catfish, crabcakes and cajun cooking!!!! Everyone was getting hungry and drooling on their keyboards. d:) It wasn't quite Civil War but enjoyable just the same! Conversation was brought back "home" with discussion of preparing Hard Tack.
I want to thank those of you who have shared some of your favorite websites with us this week. We're stilling look for more if you have any and you can send them to GFS Jim, GFS TEG and me. We will compile a complete list and share them with everyone.

**************
This Thursday is GETTYSBURG PART 3. You won't want to miss it... Written by our very own GFS TEG the stories tell about the people of Gettysburg and how the war affected them. Come on out and join us.

**************
FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE REALLY ENJOYED HAVING
YOU :-)..... COME AGAIN, WE "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY....

*************************************************************************************
NOTE: The following were sent by GFS TEG... He found them while doing research.

These Honored Dead?


The Soldiers National Cemetery at Gettysburg is one of the most important places to visit while viewing the Battlefield. It is the final resting place of many of the Federal soldiers killed in the battle. Only Union dead were, of course, allowed to be interred there, and Lincoln humbly and beautifully consecrated the ground when he delivered his famous address near there in November 1863. But are all of the dead in the National Cemetery actually Union men?

It may be interesting to know that at least six graves have been identified so far which contain, not the supposed sacred bodies of Northern heroes, but the bones of Rebels; enemies of the very men they lie beside!

One of these Confederates is buried in the Massachusetts section under the name of J. L. Johnson, Company K, 11th Massachusetts Infantry. Johnson was actually a member of the 11th Mississippi and was somehow incorrectly identified and ended up in a Yankee grave.
How many more Southerners rest here, uneasily, so far from home?


Lost at Gettysburg

George Dietz, a one-time resident of Chester, Pennsylvania, and a Civil War veteran had a most unusual experience in October of 1899. Dietz, who became a Honolulu jeweler, had lost a watch during the fighting at Gettysburg, thirty-six years earlier.

Harry Ellis, a Spanish-American War Volunteer from Kansas, was docked in the Hawaiian Islands for a short time, on his way to Manila on a military transport. While ashore, Ellis went into Dietz's jewelry store and offered a watch for sale. On being asked where he got it, he said his father, who had found it on the field at Gettysburg, had given it to him. The jeweler, George Dietz, opened it and found his own name scratched inside! He lost no time making a trade with the solider.

They Met Again 50 Years Later

During the 50th Anniversary of the battle of Gettysburg, a number of old men, some in Confederate grey, others in blue, congregated near the Angel on Cemetery Ridge, the focal point of Longstreet's Assault. It was July 3, 1913, and the average age of these ex-soldiers was 74 years.

A Union veteran overheard a former Confederate explaining : "The place is right here; I was shot right here where I stand now. I would have died if it hadn't been for a Union soldier who saved my life."

The old Federal turned around and remarked, "that's a funny coincidence, I was at the Angle too and there was a Rebel there who was pretty badly hurt. I first gave him a drink of water, and then took him upon my back and carried him out of the line of fire to the field hospital."

But, "my God," cried the Confederate, "that's just what that Yankee did for me. There couldn't have been two cases just like that at the same time. Let me look at you." He grabbed the Yankee and looked at him long and earnestly. "You are the man," he said. Further inquiry put it beyond doubt. The Confederate was A. C. Smith of the 56th Virginia and the Union man was Albert N. Hamilton of the 72nd Pennsylvania.

After a comparison of notes, it was made certain that Hamilitom had saved Smith as he sank under the Union fire at the Angle, fifty years ago.


Miss "Tommy" Kamoo

It is an unfortunate fact that woman's participation in the Battle of Gettysburg, as well as the Civil War, has mostly been overlooked. Too often, stories involving women in the ranks are not documented well enough to positively identify either the person or her actions. The following is such a case.

In 1904, a Lancaster, Pennsylvania, newspaper reported that Mrs. Abrev Kamoo had recently died in a Boston hospital. According to the article, Kamoo had been born in Tunis in 1825, and had attended the University of Heidelberg. In 1862 she had come to the U.S. where she disguised herself as " Tommy " Kamoo and immediately joined the Union Army. During the War she served as a nurse and drummer, her sex being kept hidden all the while. Mrs. Kamoo said she took part in the Battle of Gettysburg where she was slightly wounded in the nose.



*************************************************************************************

THE HELP DESK

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files".
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the
New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting
Logs and Newsletters".

NOTE: Gettysburg - Part 2 has now been uploaded into the History Lectures Library.
*****************************************************************************
NOTE:... Per Kevin's request, I'm leaving this in the Weekly. He has so graciously given us permission to print his address... Be "gentle" folks... and please... be sure to be as generous with your "donation" as Kevin is being with his time. d:) Excerpt from Kevin's previous note... [...have taken photos for people who sent me request, and mailed them for what small donation they are willing to send to cover my cost as well as my donation to the Museum] AND Folks.... be sure to check out the website Kevin has listed in his note BEFORE you contact him. What you need might be there.

Andersonville lookups
From: frye@gnat.net (FRYE FAMILY)

Hi Jim,
Please include my offer to do lookups and take pics at Andersonville in the Fireside " Chats". My offer has spread like wildfire and surprisingly, I am keeping up with the request pretty well. Most of my responses get answered in a few days and Im getting to Andersonville to take pics every week or two. If you could include the online Andersonville page so researchers can attempt to look up the info on their own, that would help speed things up. If researchers come up empty but have records that their ancesters were there, I have a CD and can cross check names by alphabet to check other spellings of the names. The online address is.....
<< http://www.corinthian.net/mccc/plookup.htm >>

I also have an address and contact at the Andersonville Muesum so that if
their Ancestors are not listed and they do have documents, I will send the
info on request.

Thank you so much and good hunting...

Kevin Frye
Butler Georgia

{{{{{Kevin}}}}} We thank you for your generous offer and we hope the membership doesn't inundate you.

*********************************************************************************
From: Jimcone252

Hello to all:
I am a newcomer to the group and for the past several weeks, I
have read your news articles and other types of articles with great interest.
I am the great-grandson of a Confederate Navy Veteran who was aboard the
Gun Boat Spray that protected the St. Marks River, just South of Tallahassee
Fla. They kept the Union Navy from landing Soldiers at the strategic points
in an effort to capture the State Capitol. When that effort failed, they landed
approximately 5,000 Union Soldiers on the East Bank of the St. Marks River
and made an effort to cross at Natural Bridge. This effort failed when the
CSA managed to raise a mere 500 young cadets, a few seasoned soldiers
and many infirm who were in the hospital at Tallahassee. The Union suffered
losses of 2,000 of their men while the CSA lost only 5. Of these five, one of
them was a relative of my family.
If anyone can add to this story, I would certainly love to discuss this with you.
I can only add, if the determination and bravery of these 500 men were
consistent throughout the war, things would definitely turned out different
than they did.
By the way, the ole Spray did her duty to keep the big boys from coming
up the St. Marks and the State Capitol at Tallahassee was the only Capitol
East of the Mississippi that was not captured! Bravo!

Jim, I've left this in again in hopes that the person who sent the reply that I deleted by mistake will resend it..

*********************************************************************************

MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!

Well here it is! In response to overwhelming number of emails indicating this to be a great idea, we have
responded in kind..... Here's how it works.. If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or
battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will
post it here... Other members seeing your request and being in the near vicinity, and are willing to assist
can email you direct (this protects your privacy) and work out the details. We recommend the "Requestor"
pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free"
assistance between members. Do unto others as........ you know :-) Keep me posted on how this is
working!!!!
GFS Jim
***********************************************
PICTURES OF THE GRAVESITE OF Edwin Nichols at the New Hope Battlefield Cemetery are requested
by Lkiwki@aol.com ..... If anyone can assist in this, please email this member direct and work out any
details or additional information. Lynne, if you hit paydirt, let me know and I'll remove this posting.

The New Hope Battlefield is just off (North ?) of US Hwy 278 about 25 miles northwest of Atlanta,
Georgia. Towns close or fairly close are Dallas, New Hope, Kennesaw, Braswell, Marietta.
##########################
Subj: Locating a grave..
From: Scotlinda

I would be interested in getting a picture of the grave of my husband's gg grandfather, ROBERT
SYLVESTER, he served with the 15th Infantry Regiment Company E from NJ. The information I have is
that he is buried in the National Cemetery in Fredricksburg, VA. Division B, Section D, Grave 306. He
died December 5, 1862, of typhoid fever shortly after mustering in on August 25th, 1862.
Thanks so much for any help..of course I will pay costs for film and mailing.
Carolee Logan

{{{Carolee}}} We'll put it up and see what hits we get....
#####################
Subj: 35th GAR
From: SkipLane@compuserve.com (Myra E. Lane)

Hello Jim:

Ike Watrous recommended that I pose the following question to your
knowledgeable Chat Room:

Can anyone help me to identify the following gentleman whose name could be
Gould, Vreeland or Post from New Jersey.

In a wonderful old photo, this uniformed gentleman wears a large brimmed
hat with an emblem comprised of laurel branches encircling 3 letters, the
central one could be an 'A,' with the number '35' at the top. Near the left
pocket of his single breasted jacket is a star-shaped medal suspended from
a (striped?) ribbon attached to an eagle at the top. He also wears what
looks like a braided mourning band on his left arm and holds a dark colored
cane topped with a white handle. The collar of his uniform is hidden by his
long beard but the top button is high on his chest suggesting the coat has
no lapels. The coat has 3 metal buttons over a vest with 6 smaller medal
buttons visible.

He most likely came from the Newfoundland-West Milford area of northern New
Jersey for his photo was among those in an album of these families dating
from between 1860-1910. I am more than willing to share a .gif image with
anyone who would be interested. My objective is to place the original photo
with a legitimate descendant of this man once identified or an interested
organization unless I find he is my own ancestor.

Any help your group can provide will be greatly appreciated.

Kind regards,
Myra Vreeland Lane

{{{{{Myra}}}}} I'm leaving this in for another week in hopes that may one of our members can help you.

***********************************************************************************

From: Leftyvs

I keep reading about the cemetery photo exchange every week. Sounds like a good plan but what if you have a Union ancestor who died of disease in a Jackson, Mississippi hospital & was buried as best as could be at the time. Where would he be buried? Does anyone know if there is a Civil War Cemetery in Mississippi? I have a lot of research to do on this yet. Any knowledge out there? I enjoy reading the newsletter.
Vicki

{{{{{Vicki}}}}} .We've got a couple other suggestions for you!!!!!!

-----------------------
From: Alf B Hill

....in reply to Vicky's Union dead in MS prison. Betty Couch Wiltshire has published quite a number of abstract-type books in MS, extending at least through 1991, when she published a two-volume set nof Mississippi Confederate Graves Registrations. I'm sure either the publishers or Mrs. Wiltshire could help with Vicky's problem. The publisher is
Heritage Books, Inc.
1540-E Pointer Ridge Place
Bowie, MD 20716

Phone (301) 390-7709

Al Hill

{{{{{Al}}}}} Thanks for passing on this info.

-----------------
From: FAD33

Also tell Vicki she can contact the Miss. Archives by e mail. Go to http://www.hotbot.com and when you get to that site, type in Mississippi Archives in the search area. This should do it.

Frances Ann

{{{{{Frances}}}}} Thank you!!!! and I'm sure Vicki thanks you also.

************************************************************************************
THE FOLLOWING ARE JUST A FEW OF THE WEBSITES GATHERED BY VARIOUS PEOPLE Have fun!!!!!!!
************************************************************************************

From: SgtABJ (Carol)

Civil War Battle Summaries by Campaign
http://www2.cr.nps.gov/abpp/battles/bycampgn.htm#Gulf65

American Civil War Information Archive
http://www.access.digex.net/~bdboyle/cw.html

The American Civil War Homepage
http://sunsite.utk.edu/civil-war/

AltaVista: Main Page
http://www.altavista.com/cgi-bin/query?pg=aq

Military Service Records on Microfilm
http://www.nara.gov/publications/microfilm/military/

Mississippi Civil War Information
http://www.shepherd.wvnet.edu/gtmcweb/cwcenter.htm

Center for the Study of the Civil War Home
http://www2.msstate.edu/~gam3/cw/

The United Daughters of the Confederacy
http://www.hqudc.org/

Civil War Battle Summaries by Campaign
http://www2.cr.nps.gov/abpp/battles/bycampgn.htm#Gulf65

****************


From: MBram10513 (Jennie)

Sons of Confederate Veterans Home Page

http://www.scv.org/

Civil War Soldiers & Sailors System
http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/

Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War

http://suvcw.org/

The Civil War Trust Home Page
http://www.civilwar.org/

The Oldest and Largest Civil War Park within the National Park Service.
Chickamauga and Chattanooga
http://www.nps.gov/chch/

Shiloh NMP Home Page
http://www.nps.gov/shil/

Kennesaw Civil War Museum
http://www.ngeorgia.com/history/kcwm.html

Civil War @ Charleston
http://www.awod.com/gallery/probono/cwchas/main.html

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania Welcome Center
http://www.gettysbg.com/

The Page County, Virginia Gallery of Confederate Photos
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Hills/1850/PageCoConfedGallery.html

Welcome to the U.S. Civil War Center!
http://www.cwc.lsu.edu/

The American Civil War
http://mirkwood.ucs.indiana.edu/acw/

Civil War Resources in the VMI Archives.
http://www.vmi.edu/~archtml/cwsource.html

A Barrel of Genealogy Links (also many civil war links)
http://cpcug.org/user/jlacombe/mark.html

Civil War Genealogy
http://homepages.dsu.edu/jankej/civilwar/genealog.htm

United States Civil War (1861-1865)
This one is HUGE!!!! Lots of information..
http://www.cfcsc.dnd.ca/links/milhist/usciv.html


USIGS Military Collection - The Civil War Era
http://www.usigs.org/library/military/links/civ.htm

Cyndi's List - U.S. - Civil War / War for Southern Independence
http://www.cyndislist.com/cw.htm

***************

From: rosewebb@datasync.com (Rose C. Webb)
Louisiana UDC
http://www.rootsweb.com/laudc/index.htm

***************
From GFS Jayne

Welcome to the Fort Delaware Society
http://www.del.net/org/fort/

American Civil War Alphabetic List of Civil War Battles
http://www.californiacentralcoast.com/commun/map/civil/statepic/alpha.html

Andersonville Prisoner Lookup
http://www.corinthian.net/mccc/plookup.htm

U.S. Army Military History Institute

http://carlisle-www.army.mil/usamhi/

Eclectic Projects, Including Civil War Histories, Indexes
http://www.tarleton.edu/~kjones

National Cemeteries and Soldier's Lots
http://www.citynet.net/mostwanted/articles/natcems1.htm

Gettysburg National Military Park

http://www.nps.gov/gett/home.htm

American Civil War Map Exhibits Timeline State Battle Maps
http://iis.dai.net/AdCast/765284/E01.html?http://americancivilwar.com/civil.html

U.S.CWC -- Civil War Links -- USCWC Cemetery Listings
This is a great site.... covers many cemeteries and lists burials in them
http://www.cwc.lsu.edu/cwc/projects/cemindex.htm


U.S. CWC -- Civil War Links -- Historic Places 1
http://www.cwc.lsu.edu/cwc/links/hist.htm#Cemeteries

Poetry and Music of the War Between the States
http://www.erols.com/kfraser/

Behind the Stonewall - 360 Degree Panoramic Images From Civil War Battlefields (Gettysburg/Chickamuaga/79th PA Infantry)

http://www.jatruck.com/stonewall/

MHI Photograph Database
http://carlisle-www.army.mil/usamhi/PhotoDB.html

Brothers Bound

http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~south1/bound.htm

Yahoo! Arts:Humanities:History:U.S. History:19th Century:Civil War (1861-1865)

http://dir.yahoo.com/Arts/Humanities/History/U_S__History/19th_Century/Civil_War__1861_1865_/

*****************
From: SusiCP

The Sultana Association

http://sultana.org/

*****************
From: SOrwick914


Patriot
http://members.aol.com/viking1807/patriot.html

*****************
From: GFS LindaE
(Linda sent many, many more than are listed below!!!!!!!!!!)

New York in the Civil War

http://www.rootsweb.com/~nycivilw/

Genealogy Military
http://www2.primecomm.net/trees/military.htm

James River Publications
http://www.erols.com/jreb/civilwar.htm

The Civil War Archive Home Page
http://www.civilwararchive.com/

AMERICA'S CIVIL WAR (magazine)
http://www.thehistorynet.com/americascivilwar/


CIVIL WAR TIMES (magazine)
http://www.thehistorynet.com/civilwartimes/


North & South magazine (magazine)
http://www.northandsouthmagazine.com/

*****************
From: IrishInCal

Philadelphia in the Civil War

http://searches.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/ifetch2?/u1/data/pa+index+763713061+F

**************
From: FI WATROUS


Genealogy CD List
http://genweb.net/~gen-cds/cdlist.html

Google (a beta search engine)
http://www.google.com/

The Civil War Artillery Page

http://www.cwartillery.org/artillery.html

Overview of Confederate Military History
http://www.civilwarhome.com/confederateoverview.htm

The Official Records of the War of the Rebellion
http://www.civilwarhome.com/records.htm

Civil War Women - Internet Sources
http://scriptorium.lib.duke.edu/women/cwdocs.html

Civil War Index Page
http://homepages.dsu.edu/jankej/civilwar/civilwar.htm

*********************************************************************************

A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of
Interest and Pleas for HELP................

************************************************************************************

From: GLITZ01
Have you ever heard of the "BUTTERMILK RANGERS" that served in the Civil war. John Myrick
Montgomery was supposed to have served in this unit and it was probably a rifle unit. Shirley

{{{Shirley}}} We'll leave this in for yet another week... ANY OF YOU UNIT EXPERTS
OUT THERE HEARD OF UNIT ABOVE??????

NOTE: Shirley reports she hasn't gotten any answers on this yet....

*************************************************************************************


NOTE: VFTurner2 sent me the following:

From: Linda Stevens

HI,
I have in my possession the civil war pension record of WILLIAM GAULT of Bucks
Co. PA.. According to the record he was married to a ELIZA LITHGOW, who died
11/8/1879.

In the record one daughter is mentioned, HESTER GAULT.

As this man doesn't seem to be linked to my GAULT line, I would be more than
happy to give this record to a relative. I would only ask for copy costs and
postage.

Anybody who might be interested can contact me about it.

Linda

NOTE: I'm leaving this in another week hoping someone new will recognize Mr. Gault.

*********************************************************************************

From: Docflats

Dear GFS Jayne,
Thanks so much for remembering the Irish contribution to the War. My father used to tell me of going up to his father's attic as a small child and caressing the uniform the sabre and the hat of his grandfather. He was a member of the Michigan 1st regiment of Engineers. They built bridges and I believe repaired railroads. Have read accounts of their movements, made me proud.
Thanks,
Mary Lou

{{{{{Mary Lou}}}}} Thank you for sharing this with us... and you should be proud!!!!


*********************************************************************************
From: BJSTulsa

I have not contributed to the chat or the Weekly Fireside but enjoy it immensely.
I had several ancestors in the Civil War. Zachariah Beckham and Calloway Stephens are the two that I would like to know more about. We know quite a lot
about the military life of Zack but would like to know who his parents are. Census
records of Newton County, Arkansas 1850 show his birthplace as TN 1824.

{{{{{Betty}}}}} I've put your note here.. maybe one of the "faithful" will know your "Zack".
*********************************************************************************
From: FI WATROUS

If you are planning a trip with your family, consider looking at the website for the new
PAMPLIN HISTORICAL PARK AND THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF THE CIVIL WAR SOLDIER
scheduled to open in its expanded facilities Memorial Day, May 29, 1999, near Petersburg, VA

The emphasis for this museum is on what life was like for the ordinary people
who fought in Civil War and the civilians whose lives were affected.
The 25,000 sq ft museum completes the expansion of the site which first opened in 1994, as well as purchase of additional acres which brings the total acreage of the site to 3643 acres. It is located on the battlefield where Union troops broke through Confederate defenses around Petersburg on April 2, 1865

The museum features seven galleries that trace soldiers' experiences from their civilian days to their final fate. 21st century technology, life-size dioramas, interactive programs, audio tours, artifacts, videos and computer games, reproductions of soldiers' huts, a sutler's cabin and a supply wagon. There are battlefield trails and a plantation home.

Of special interest in the emphasis on education for the whole family. Many children's events are included, including a day camp program. I wholeheartedly support getting young people involved in our nation's history at an early age.
They are the ones who will make the decisions in the future about preserving our nation's heritage by supporting and funding restoration and preservation of battlefields and other historical sites.

A museum store offers a large selection of books, videos, music & gifts. These can also be ordered online.

Park's website: http://www.pamplinpark.org

(I have no connection with this organization - thought I would like to share the information with interested parties.)

Ike Watrous
FIWATROUS@aol.com

{{{{{Ike}}}}} Thanks for the heads-up. Maybe JRose10700 will put this on her trip itinerary. d:)

*********************************************************************************

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT………….

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War".

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died
because of.

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate
one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit;
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events,
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly
Fireside."

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :)

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste-
haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events******

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFS Jim, GFS TEG
and GFS Jayne and our many faithful friends :)

3/25/99 - "Gettysburg Night - Part III - stories and tales collected over the years by GFS TEG (our own Tom :-)) Yes, there are more :)

4/1/99 - OPEN CHAT

4/8/99 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. Don't forget to send in any that you would like shared....
These are great evenings. These are indeed special evenings.

4/15/99 - OPEN CHAT

4/22/99 - "Gettysburg Night - Part IV - stories and tales collected over the years by GFS TEG (our own Tom :-)) Yes, there are more :)

4/29/99 - TO BE ANNOUNCED

.............and that take's us to the end of the month of April.

We'll See You Thursday Night……….!
Your Hosts
GFS Jim, GFS TEG and GFS Jayne

Hear Ye ..............Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending March 28, 1999

If you weren't with us Thursday night, you really missed another good one!!! It was Gettysburg Series - Part 3. We're so sorry GFS Jim couldn't be with us, seems he had to take a little "side trip" to Alaska before going home. You'll see his note a little further on. I need to send a VERY special thank you to LADYTUBES1 for greeting folks at the door for us. Sis, we appreciate your "volunteering" to help.
I want to thank those of you who have shared some of your favorite websites. We're stilling look for more if you have any and you can send them to GFS Jim, GFS TEG and me. We will compile a complete list and share them with everyone.

******************

A Note from our wandering partner:

...Your wandering partner has returned to the "Family Nest" finally. I was planning on getting home Thursday night, but I got a call Thursday morning in Shreveport as I was getting ready to pack up and informed that I needed to take a side trip to Fairbanks, Alaska, travel up to Eielson AFB, spend a day with the base commander wrapping up test activity from there and THEN head home. So instead of being able to give my honey a hug on Thursday night, I had to wait until Saturday night.....

...I did get about half a day on Wednesday last to drive down to Mansfield, Louisiana and visit the Civil War State Memorial there ... That was the site of the Battle of Mansfield. Met a neat Park Ranger who is also a re-enactor from the Texas Cavalry. I took a bunch of notes which I'll put in the newsletter next week. He is about to get online and I invited him to come visit our group.

Well "Nuff" for now. I'm gonna go hug my honey again. It's good to be home. It's the first full day off I've had in a month... Whew...

Jimmy

**************
This Thursday is Open Chat, when you can get answers to all those questions you have answered. Come on out and join us. We'll have the warm cider ready and extra logs for the fire.

**************
FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS ON THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE REALLY ENJOYED HAVING
YOU :-)..... COME AGAIN, WE "RELISH" YOUR COMPANY....

*************************************************************************************
From: MMeadPond - Maureen thought we all might enjoy the following story.

From: acfjsl@pcola.gulf.net (SweetShrub)
Reply-to: acfjsl@pcola.gulf.net
To: FERGUSON-L@rootsweb.com

Dear Sandra and all,
I would like to add a few things to your article about
Confederate Guerilla, Champ Ferguson. Something this article
doesn't mention is that the Sandusky's and the Ferguson's were
related by marriage. Mr. Pinkowski mentions the comments of
descendants of Anthony Sadowski (Sandusky). They said that Champ
was the most desperate and fiendish guerilla chief in the
Confederate Army. What they failed to mention is that they are
related to Champ by the marriage of Anthony Sandusky's first
daughter, Susan, to Champ's uncle Benjamin. He also failed to
mention that it is well believed among those who hold Champ in
esteem that he was defending the honor of his wife and daughter.
Champ lived among Union sympathizers who, while he was away from
home scouting for the Confederates, caused his wife and daughter
to march down the road naked and cook a meal for them in that
state of undress. When Champ found out about this, he swore to
get his revenge on these 10 or 12 men. In those days in Kentucky,
if someone offended your family, you sought revenge on that man's
whole family. That was the law of the mountains. Hatfield's and
McCoy's come to mind. So Champ killed the men who abused his
family and some of their family members as well. I cannot defend
him, as I don't believe murder is right, of course, but he did
have reason to want those men's hides. Capt. Champ Ferguson is
now considered a hero by some militia groups because he was a
large, fierce frightening man who was an expert at scouting,
deceiving the Union army and an excellent weaponsman. Even the
soldiers of Morgan's raiders waited in anticipation to meet the
infamous Champ Ferguson. He knew the land of the
Kentucky/Tennessee border like no one else. He could recapture
rebel prisoners who had been taken by the Union army before the
yankees knew what hit them. He was an excellent marksman and was
fearless when faced with hand-to-hand combat with the enemy.

In the book "Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come", by John Fox, Jr.,
Champ is called by the name Rebel Jerry Dillon. While the book is
a work of fiction, Mr. Fox researched the work very well. He
describes the horror of the Civil War and the way in which both
armies went about recruiting soldiers. The Union army conscripted
any man who owned a slave. According to some of my families
papers and Civil War letters, the Confederates simply came to
people's homes and "stole" the men of the household. It was
nothing for a woman to stand in her kitchen and watch her family
members gunned down before her eyes. The atrocities were on both
sides, not just the Confederate side. It was the order of the day
to steal anything the army could use from anyone who had food,
horses, cows, guns. Mr. Fox also shows the tender side of Champ
Ferguson when he tells how Champ took to one of the young Rebel
soldiers, protecting him like he was his own son. He recaptured
the young boy when the boy was taken prisoner by the Union army.
Champ's own son had died as a child of one of the plagues of the
time. His wife also was taken by the disease. He remarried after
that and had a daughter. Champ's home was burned because of his
involvement with the rebels. He had much to be angry about. So
you see, to me Mr. Pinkowski didn't tell the whole story about
Capt. Champ and one must know the whole story to stand in
judgment of him. By the way, I am not a descendant of Champ
Ferguson's family but I believe (but so far have not proven) that
I am Champ's 1st cousin 6 times removed. I believe that my
ggg-grandfather, William Ferguson was Champ's grandfather's
brother. My family and Champ's lived in the same area of Clinton
Co. KY and both my grandfather's and gg-grandfather's names were
Champion Ferguson. Guerilla Champ's daughter's name was Anne
Ferguson. And so is mine.

Keep on Rootin"
Anne Ferguson (aka SweetShrub)

{{{{{Meaux}}}}} Thank you for sending this story....... very interesting indeed.
*************************************************************************************

THE HELP DESK

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files".
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. The "Firesides" when they eventually get there after their 30 days in the
New Files section are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting
Logs and Newsletters".


*****************************************************************************
NOTE:... Per Kevin's request, I'm leaving this in the Weekly. He has so graciously given us permission to print his address... Be "gentle" folks... and please... be sure to be as generous with your "donation" as Kevin is being with his time. d:) Excerpt from Kevin's previous note... [...have taken photos for people who sent me request, and mailed them for what small donation they are willing to send to cover my cost as well as my donation to the Museum] AND Folks.... be sure to check out the website Kevin has listed in his note BEFORE you contact him. What you need might be there.

Andersonville lookups
From: frye@gnat.net (FRYE FAMILY)

Hi Jim,
Please include my offer to do lookups and take pics at Andersonville in the Fireside " Chats". My offer has spread like wildfire and surprisingly, I am keeping up with the request pretty well. Most of my responses get answered in a few days and Im getting to Andersonville to take pics every week or two. If you could include the online Andersonville page so researchers can attempt to look up the info on their own, that would help speed things up. If researchers come up empty but have records that their ancesters were there, I have a CD and can cross check names by alphabet to check other spellings of the names. The online address is.....
<< http://www.corinthian.net/mccc/plookup.htm >>

I also have an address and contact at the Andersonville Muesum so that if
their Ancestors are not listed and they do have documents, I will send the
info on request.

Thank you so much and good hunting...

Kevin Frye
Butler Georgia

{{{{{Kevin}}}}} We thank you for your generous offer and we hope the membership doesn't inundate you.

*********************************************************************************
From: Jimcone252

Hello to all:
I am a newcomer to the group and for the past several weeks, I
have read your news articles and other types of articles with great interest.
I am the great-grandson of a Confederate Navy Veteran who was aboard the
Gun Boat Spray that protected the St. Marks River, just South of Tallahassee
Fla. They kept the Union Navy from landing Soldiers at the strategic points
in an effort to capture the State Capitol. When that effort failed, they landed
approximately 5,000 Union Soldiers on the East Bank of the St. Marks River
and made an effort to cross at Natural Bridge. This effort failed when the
CSA managed to raise a mere 500 young cadets, a few seasoned soldiers
and many infirm who were in the hospital at Tallahassee. The Union suffered
losses of 2,000 of their men while the CSA lost only 5. Of these five, one of
them was a relative of my family.
If anyone can add to this story, I would certainly love to discuss this with you.
I can only add, if the determination and bravery of these 500 men were
consistent throughout the war, things would definitely turned out different
than they did.
By the way, the ole Spray did her duty to keep the big boys from coming
up the St. Marks and the State Capitol at Tallahassee was the only Capitol
East of the Mississippi that was not captured! Bravo!

{{{{{Jim}}}}}, Finally...........Here is the answer I inadvertantly deleted!!!!!!!!

---------------------

From: AslanJ

Jim - could it have been my response re: the cadets from Tallahassee? The Military School was where FL State University is now. I mentioned that my Daddy was a "Gator", from U of F in Gainesville and made fun of my husband, the NOLE (FSU Seminole) for going to a "girl's school", and we later found out that before FSU was a girl's college, it was a BOY's Military School, and they were the heros of the battle you speak of.

I didn't answer before, because I thought that my answer had been printed, but now I am not sure.

Judy Canant

{{{{{Judy}}}}} Thanks for resending this!!!!... I was so mad at myself for hitting the delete button instead of Keep as new.

*********************************************************************************
From: MaryARoots

I have this book: A Battlefield Atlas of the Civil War by Craig L. Symonds. It has pictures of maps of famous battle, plus pictures of Generals and various other pictures. If this could be helpful to anyone, let me know. I could scan a picture & email it to whoever.

Also, I just ordered an 8 X 10 glossy photo of my Civil War ancestor's brother, who fought at Chatanooga, TN in 1863. I was delighted to find this photo from the US Army Military Institute of History. Their site is online. MHI Photograph Database
Perhaps you already know about it. If not, let me know, & I'll send you the link.
Mary

{{{{{Mary}}}}}} I'm sure our members will be delighted also should they find their ancestor's picture.

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MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!

Well here it is! In response to overwhelming number of emails indicating this to be a great idea, we have
responded in kind..... Here's how it works.. If you are trying to get photographs of a gravesite or
battlefield, to collect for your Civil War ancestor research and records, then send us a request and we will
post it here... Other members seeing your request and being in the near vicinity, and are willing to assist
can email you direct (this protects your privacy) and work out the details. We recommend the "Requestor"
pay for all film costs and any postage involved for a helping member. This is intended to be a "Free"
assistance between members. Do unto others as........ you know :-) Keep me posted on how this is
working!!!!
GFS Jim
***********************************************
PICTURES OF THE GRAVESITE OF Edwin Nichols at the New Hope Battlefield Cemetery are requested
by Lkiwki@aol.com ..... If anyone can assist in this, please email this member direct and work out any
details or additional information. Lynne, if you hit paydirt, let me know and I'll remove this posting.

The New Hope Battlefield is just off (North ?) of US Hwy 278 about 25 miles northwest of Atlanta,
Georgia. Towns close or fairly close are Dallas, New Hope, Kennesaw, Braswell, Marietta.
##########################
Subj: Locating a grave..
From: Scotlinda

I would be interested in getting a picture of the grave of my husband's gg grandfather, ROBERT
SYLVESTER, he served with the 15th Infantry Regiment Company E from NJ. The information I have is
that he is buried in the National Cemetery in Fredricksburg, VA. Division B, Section D, Grave 306. He
died December 5, 1862, of typhoid fever shortly after mustering in on August 25th, 1862.
Thanks so much for any help..of course I will pay costs for film and mailing.
Carolee Logan

{{{Carolee}}} We'll put it up and see what hits we get....
#####################
Subj: 35th GAR
From: SkipLane@compuserve.com (Myra E. Lane)

Hello Jim:

Ike Watrous recommended that I pose the following question to your
knowledgeable Chat Room:

Can anyone help me to identify the following gentleman whose name could be
Gould, Vreeland or Post from New Jersey.

In a wonderful old photo, this uniformed gentleman wears a large brimmed
hat with an emblem comprised of laurel branches encircling 3 letters, the
central one could be an 'A,' with the number '35' at the top. Near the left
pocket of his single breasted jacket is a star-shaped medal suspended from
a (striped?) ribbon attached to an eagle at the top. He also wears what
looks like a braided mourning band on his left arm and holds a dark colored
cane topped with a white handle. The collar of his uniform is hidden by his
long beard but the top button is high on his chest suggesting the coat has
no lapels. The coat has 3 metal buttons over a vest with 6 smaller medal
buttons visible.

He most likely came from the Newfoundland-West Milford area of northern New
Jersey for his photo was among those in an album of these families dating
from between 1860-1910. I am more than willing to share a .gif image with
anyone who would be interested. My objective is to place the original photo
with a legitimate descendant of this man once identified or an interested
organization unless I find he is my own ancestor.

Any help your group can provide will be greatly appreciated.

Kind regards,
Myra Vreeland Lane

{{{{{Myra}}}}} seems we've gotten lucky this week with answers... see below
---------------------------
From: QNavyWife

Hi,
Didn't know which one of you I should send this to, but figured if I got it to all of you, I'd get the right one! This is in response to the query from SkipLane@compuserve.com (Myra Vreeland Lane)
She was describing a picture she has of a Civil war soldier from NJ...
on his hat she said there was an emblem that was laurel leaves encircling 3 letters, the middle on maybe an "A"....well, that sounds like a GAR emblem to me.... I'd have to see the picture to be certain but from it's description, it sounds like a GAR emblem, and the 35 on it would probably be the GAR post number..... Also, the man was wearing a medal that was star shaped hanging from a ribbon with an eagle at the top. This is a GAR medal....I have seen quite a few pictures of them on uniforms....and yes, the ribbon was striped, red, white and blue.... I don't know anything about the NJ GAR posts but on the NJ GENWEB site she might be able to verify if there was a GAR post 35 near the area she thinks the man came from. I hope that this info might help her out a bit!
Thanks
Robin Moore
QNavyWife@aol.com

{{{{Robin}}}}} What a week this has been... so many responses to the postings!!! This is great!!!! Makes everything we do worth it!!!
***********************************************************************************
From: Met52950

Thank you for the report of-The Weekly Fireside-of 3-21-1999.

It was not helpful, but extremely interesting. If there is a weekly up date list I would like to be on that list.

I hopefully will be at the Weekly Fireside, but would appreciate the same type of report you sent.
Thanks Again!

{{{{{Carol Lynn}}}}} We're glad you enjoyed the Weekly Fireside.. One day we hope you will also find it helpful as well as interesting. You are on our distribution list until you tell us to take you off!!!

*******************************************************************************
From: Keskalublu
To: GFS Jayne
Sent on: AOL 4.0 for Windows 95 sub 205

First let me say THANKS for continuing to send me the WEEKLY. I do not get to attend the chat due to work schedule, but enjoy reading the WEEKLY report.
I just returned from MS on a search for info and burial site of my gg grandfather Wm. (Bill)
W. Ingram, a CSA veteran. I had no luck even though I know he died 5/5/15 in Halcombe, Carroll Co MS. He does not appear to have a CSA noted grave site. Nor does it appear that a pension was ever filed for. The family story is that he was badly wounded in the leg and returned to N. Carolina to his wife and son John J--my g grandfather and daughter Florence. Do not know his wife's name but she left him and the 2 children. He moved to MS where it appears he had other family and by 1867 was remarried to Elizabeth and had started a new family. If anyone can help me with any info or ideas how to continue my search, I would be greatly appreciative and excited. Keskalublu@aol.com
PS I visited the national cemetary at Vicksburg. I highly recommend it for a true visual "feel" for a strategic battle in this war and the beautifully preserved memory of loved-ones past.

************************************************************************************
THE FOLLOWING ARE JUST A FEW OF THE WEBSITES GATHERED BY VARIOUS PEOPLE Have fun!!!!!!!
************************************************************************************

Good Genealogy Sites to Check
http://www.alaska.net/~bearpaw/sites.htm

Military libraries
http://www.cfcsc.dnd.ca/links/millib/index.html

Veteran/Military Web Sites
http://members.aol.com/veterans/warlib6.htm

How to do Genealogy Research in Military Records - Links
http://www.rootsquest.com/%7Emilitary/howto.htm

United States, Civil War Regimental Histories Index, All States
http://www.tarleton.edu/%7Ekjones/unions.html

--------------------------

From GFS LindaE
The Virginia Civil War Home Page

http://members.aol.com/jweaver300/grayson/vacwhp.htm

--------------------------

From: JRose10700

NARA's Civil War Records page

http://www.nara.gov/genealogy/civilwar.html

Civil War History - Bullrun.com by Encyberpedia
http://www.bullrun.com/

Bull Run Photos from the Library of Congress: American Memories
http://memory.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/v?ammem/cwar:0001-0014:T1

Bull Run Civil War Round Table
http://members.aol.com/brcwrt/index.htm

Prologue: Civil War Records
Civil War Records: An Introduction and Invitation
by Michael P. Musick
http://www.nara.gov/publications/prologue/musick.html

Preserving the Legacy of the United States Colored Troops
by Budge Weidman
http://www.nara.gov/education/teaching/usct/usctart.html

The Record: March 1998: Headstones of Union Civil War Veterans
by Claire Prechtel-Kluskens
http://www.nara.gov/publications/record/mar98/family.html

Civil War Rosters - Ancestral Trails (by state)
http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/9787/cw.html

CWSS.4 Discover more information on Civil War soldiers
http://www.itd.nps.gov/cwss/cwss4.html


Genealogy and the American Civil War
http://www.outfitters.com/illinois/history/civil/cwgeneal.html

-----------------------

From: Genkidlet1

Resource Links for the Civil War Historian or Genealogist
http://www.erols.com/brant/GeorgiaBrigade/links.html

Forsyth's Unknown Confederate Soldiers
http://www.inetnow.net/~ehallman/cem.htm

Civil War Web Sites
http://members.aol.com/Shortyhack/links.html

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of
Interest and Pleas for HELP................

*********************************************************************************
From: GLITZ01
Have you ever heard of the "BUTTERMILK RANGERS" that served in the Civil war. John Myrick
Montgomery was supposed to have served in this unit and it was probably a rifle unit. Shirley

------------------

ED. NOTE: I received the following note from Shirley herself this week...

My sister in law had an awful time sending this to me-I am having trouble opening it. It is the answer to the question you have been postingh for me looking for the "Buttermilk Rangers"
Company K, Sixteenth (16) South Carolina, Taylor's Rosters and Notes <http://www.geocities.com/BourbonStreet/Square/3873/franklin7k.html> This is another part of it 16th South Carolina, Battle of Franklin,-2

ED. NOTE: Since she couldn't get the first one open, I opened it copied and pasted all the info into email and sent it to her. The following is her response.
---------------
Thank you so much-that was so kind of you... ...
At least we finally got the answer to our Buttermilk Rangers. Pat is slowly running across distant relatives who hold the answers. I will print this-thank you so. much. Shirley

{{{{Shirley}}}}} This just must be our lucky week!!!!! Glad to be of help.
*************************************************************************************


NOTE: VFTurner2 sent me the following:

From: Linda Stevens

HI,
I have in my possession the civil war pension record of WILLIAM GAULT of Bucks
Co. PA.. According to the record he was married to a ELIZA LITHGOW, who died
11/8/1879.

In the record one daughter is mentioned, HESTER GAULT.

As this man doesn't seem to be linked to my GAULT line, I would be more than
happy to give this record to a relative. I would only ask for copy costs and
postage.

Anybody who might be interested can contact me about it.

Linda

NOTE: I'm leaving this in another week hoping someone new will recognize Mr. Gault.

*********************************************************************************

From: Docflats

Because you printed my comment regarding the contribution of the Irish in the Civil War I received a letter from another descendant of the Michigan 1st regiment of
Engineers and mechanics. Turns out her grandmother had two brothers who served
in that same regiment and a coworker's great-grandfather was thier Captain. He wrote a history of the regiment. Can't wait to get my hands on it!!! Thank you so much.
Mary Lou

{{{{{Mary Lou}}}}} It just doesn't get anybetter than this!!!!!


*********************************************************************************
From: BJSTulsa

I have not contributed to the chat or the Weekly Fireside but enjoy it immensely.
I had several ancestors in the Civil War. Zachariah Beckham and Calloway Stephens are the two that I would like to know more about. We know quite a lot
about the military life of Zack but would like to know who his parents are. Census
records of Newton County, Arkansas 1850 show his birthplace as TN 1824.

{{{{{Betty}}}}} I've put your note here.. maybe one of the "faithful" will know your "Zack".
*********************************************************************************
From: FI WATROUS

This should be helpful to anyone researching their POW ancestor, or if they think they might have been a POW.
The URL is: http://searches.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/listsearch.pl ( type in CW-POW into the data base )

{{{{{Ike}}}}} Thanks... I'm sure there are lots of folks who will be trying this one

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT………….

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the American (United States) Civil War".

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died
because of.

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate
one Thursday a month to the sharing of Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit;
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events,
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly
Fireside."

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :)

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste-
haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events******

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Hosts GFS Jim, GFS TEG
and GFS Jayne and our many faithful friends :)

3/25/99 - "Gettysburg Night - Part III - stories and tales collected over the years by GFS TEG (our own Tom :-)) Yes, there are more :)

4/1/99 - OPEN CHAT

4/8/99 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. Don't forget to send in any that you would like shared....
These are great evenings. These are indeed special evenings.

4/15/99 - OPEN CHAT
retur
4/22/99 - "Gettysburg Night - Part IV - stories and tales collected over the years by GFS TEG (our own Tom :-)) Yes, there are more :)

4/29/99 - TO BE ANNOUNCED

.............and that take's us to the end of the month of April.

We'll See You Thursday Night……….!
Your Hosts
GFS Jim, GFS TEG and GFS Jayne

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