June 1998 Weekly Fireside

Hear Ye ..............Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group
Week ending 7 June 1998

What a great crowd Thursday night. By the time we finished up OPEN CHAT, Jayne and I were both “PANTING”!!!! Y’all were indeed a lively bunch and “Tons” of great questions.... Heh Heh.... 

There were two questions relating to Gratiot Street Prison in St Louis, Missouri, and the Rock Island Prison in Illinois. I sent responses to those asking the questions, but I’m also going to post them (as they are rather healthy) in the Civil War Files area of the Genealogy Forum Files Library, so be watching for them. Also, I’m getting such a great response to the “Fireside” that I’m filling up the newsletter to the max allowed by AOL every week. Sooo if you don’t see your notes immediately, don’t panic... I’m putting them in as space allows.... There’s only about a week’s backlog so far.. :-)

This, being about half way between Mother’s Day in May and Father’s Day in June and as I was listening to the sound track from Ken Burn’s “Lewis and Clark Expedition”, I heard the following......

“Honored Parents
I am now on an expedition to the “Western Lands” with Capt. Lewis and Capt. Clark through the interior parts of North America. We are to ascend the Missouri River with a boat as far as it is navigable and then go by land to the Western Ocean if nothing prevents it. I will write next winter if I have a change.
Sgt. John Ordway”

................................................................................oh my!!

I'm going to keep this ANNOUNCEMENT up so you will all be able to plan for it when we get it actually nailed on the schedule.. GFS Karen and GFS BB are going to leave the Native American SIG for one night and come visit us to give a Guest Fireside on the "Redstick War". The role of the Native Americans in the Civil War. We’ve RESCHEDULED for the END OF JULY, because GFS Karen just “had to go play grandma to her brand new grandson”, so PASS THE WORD.... This is a rarely covered topic but so pertinent to the history we focus on in this SIG..... We're now looking at the 23rd of July. I'll keep you posted.

FOR ALL THE 1ST TIMERS - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED YOUR PARTICIPATION..... COME AGAIN....

Now this version of "The Fireside" continues a series of information about Confederate Prisons.. Hope you find this useful...... This week is Savannah, Georgia and Tulcaloosa, Alabama. THIS WILL COMPLETE THIS SERIES ON CONFEDERATE PRISONS.

As this week finishes the above series, I’m going to start a section called “Did You Know!”........ Let me know what you think......

The other continuing series is on the Civil War Military Records which can be found at, or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers........ So many of you have been astonished that those records are available through the FHCs, that I thought this would also be very useful....

This upcoming Thursday is the Letters Songs and Poems (our highlight of the month), send your Letters, Songs and Poems. Don't forget to check the schedule are at the end of the Newsletter in the "Upcoming Schedule" area.
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THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. Meeting Logs are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters".
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CIVIL WAR MILITARY PRISON INFORMATION;
taken from "GUIDE TO THE ARCHIVES OF THE GOVERNMENT OF THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA"; compiled by Henry Putney Beers; "The National Archives".

Savannah, Georgia -- In July 1864 Federal prisoners arrived at Savannah from Macon and Cahaba prisons. The prison was located on grounds adjoining the old U.S. marine hospital. By the end of the first week in September there were 1,500 prisoners at Savannah. Since there were not enough soldiers to guard the prisoners, they were moved to Charleston, Millen, and Blackshear, Georgia, within a short period of time. Savannah was occupied by U.S. Forces on Dec. 21, 1864. 
The commandant of this prison was Col. Richard A. Wayne.
No records of this prison have been found.

Tuscaloosa, Alabama. -- [pronounced Tus-ka-oo-sa] -- On instructions dated Oct. 28, 1861, Maj. J.L. Calhoun, assistant quartermaster at Montomery, rented an abandoned papermill at Tuscaloosa for use as a military prison. Prisoners were brought from Richmond, Montgomery, and Pensacola. Early in Mar. 1862, 214 prisoners captured at Fort Donelson were held temporarily here. Although this was originally a small prison when it started, by 1864, more than 4,000 prisoners were imprisoned.
The commandant of this prison was Maj. Elias Griswold
No records of this prison have been found.

................................................This completes this Series........
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U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers.............................

The next stage of series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

Now for some more Civil War Specific Information...............

The Civil War was fought between the Northern and Southern (Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia) states, beginning on 12 April 1861 when troops in South Carolina fired upon the garrison at Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor. Approximately 3.5 million soldiers fought in the war. The war resulted in almost 600,000 deaths and affected nearly every family in those regions of the country.

GENERAL REFERENCE SOURCES: 

U.S. War Department. “The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Unon and Confederate Armies.” 70 volumes in 127 parts. 1880-1900. Reprint. Gettysburg, Pa.: The National Historical Society, 1985. National Archives Microfilm Publication M262. (FHL book 973 M29u; films 845,306-426; FHLC computer number 207767.) The four series of this compilation, known as the OR (Official Records), contain correspondence, battle reports of officers, information on prisoners, and activities of the war departments of both governments.

the following is an index to this set.......................

Ainsworth, Fred C., and Joseph W. Kirkley. “The War of the Rebession: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies ... General Ind3ex and Additions and Corrections. 1901. Reprint. Gettysburg, Pa.: The National Historical Society. 1972. (FHL book 973 M29u index; film 430.054.) This index contains names of officers who submitted reports and the names of military units. The names of individual soldiers who were killed, captured, wounded, missing, drafted, and pensioned and the names of itical prisoners are not found in the index, so you must search the index under the names of battles, regiments, prisons, government agencies, and bureaus for such for such lists. References to the OR series number (a Roman numeral) are followed by the number of the volume (an Arabic number). You must then refer to the index in that volume to get the page number.

U.S. Navy Department. “Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion.” 30 volumes. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1894-1922. National Archives Microfilm Publication M275, (FHL book 973 M2unr; films 1,490,058-88; FHLC computer number 367656.) Similar to the official records of the armies, it is known as the ORN (Official Records .... Navy). Its two series contain reports and correspondence on the Northern blockade of southern ports and on matters concerning the Convederate Navy. Volume 1, series II has an index to Union and Confederate ships, statistical data, and muster rolls of confederate vessels. To find specific film numbers with the Family History Library Catalog on microfiche, search the Locality section under UNITED STATES - HISTORY - CIVIL WAR, 1961-1865 - NAVAL OPERATIONS.

The following is an index to this set:

Knox, Dudley W. “Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion.... General Index ... 1927. Reprint. New York: Antiquarian Press, 1961. (FHL book 973 M2unr index, film 924,604, item 2.)

.........................to be continued...

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From: MMeadPond

Hi!! Just in case you don't subscribe to the SC list, I thought I'd pass this your way! Maureen
-----------------

On 20 August 1864, a chosen group of 600 Confederate Officers left Ft.
Delaware, as prisoners of war, bound for the Union Army base at Hilton
Head, SC. They were to be placed in a stockade in front of Union
batteries at the seige of Charleston. They were placed on Morris
Island, at the mouth of the harbor in an open 1 1/2 acre pen, under
shelling of friendly artillery fire. This was in retaliation for the
conditions of Union prisoners at Andersonville, GA. and Salisbury, NC.

On Oct 21, after 45 days under fire, the weakened survivors were removed
to Ft. Pulaski, Ga., here crowded into the cold, damp casemates of the
fort. On 19 Nov., 197 of the men were sent back to Hilton Head to
relieve the overcrowding. Here they spend another 45 days on starvation
rations. 13 died at Ft. Pulaski and 5 more at Hilton Head.

On 12 March, 1865, the remaining members of this group were returned to
Ft. Delaware where an additional 25 died., thus leaving their numbers
about one-third what it began. They were not released until July 1865.

This group of men became known throughout the south as The Immortal Six-
Hundred. Several books have been written about them.

If you think one of your Confederate Officer ancestors might have been
in this group, I'd be happy to look them up for you. Please give me a
complete name if it's a common one, i.e., Smith, Brown, etc.

Doris


==== SCROOTS Mailing List ====
Search Features for a RootsWeb Mailing List 
http://www.shelby.net/shelby/jr/robertsn/rwsearch.htm

Steven J. Coker, carolina@yours.com
Manager, The South Carolina Genealogy Forum
http://members.tripod.com/~SCROOTS

{{{Mosey}}} thanks for the help.....
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Subj: Form NATF 80 and records in the National Archives
From: NEVassau

I have come across so many people who are not aware of the remaining document records portion of the Civil War pension records as well as other records that are in the archives that go unknown to people. These records go unknown because the National Archives does not advertise the fact that they have them. It is in these unknown records that I personally have gained the most genealogy facts on Civil War ancestors and I thought I would share with you on how to obtain these unkown records. I first found out about them in a book titled below.

The following is from a book by Bertram Hawthorne Groene called "Tracing Your Civil War Ancestor". Mr. Groene writes.........

"What may not be quite so clear to the beginning reseacher is the the record of a man's military service in any one organization is wholly separate from the record of his service in any other organization. This means that if your ancestor joined the Sixteenth New York and later transferred to the Twenty-eighth, your NATF Form 80 request will get you his service in only the one unit you requested, the Sixteenth New York. It will take another NATF Form 80 to get his service record with the Twenty-eighth New York. You will be billed for each form answered.
Send the forms and see what your inquiry brings. If your soldier was an enlisted volunteer, the chances are that not more than ten pages of records exist. If, however, your soldier was an officer, there is a much better chance that there are extensive records. This is especially true if he was a commanding officer, an inspector, a commissary officer, a regimental adjutant, a surgeon, or perhaps a chaplain. Where officers are concerned, there may be thirty more pages of which you are totally unaware and of which no one will tell you unless you inquire. If you have reason to believe from the rank and position of responsibility of your soldier that there may be more than ten pages, the best approach is to staple a note or write across the tops of your NATF form "Send all military records". Then take another NATF form and write across the top "Send all pension records". With luck, your requests will be returned to you with an estimate of the cost of the additional records. You will never get research done less expensively, no matter what the extra costs are.
If the military records indicate that great-grandfather was given a general court-martial ( a secret the family has successfully hidden for a hundred years or so), reach for another NATF Form 80, fill it out, and staple a note or write across the top "Please send all court-martial records". You need to do this because military records do not include court-martial records, nor will you be informed of their existence unless you request them. Unfortunately for descendants, Confederate court-martial records are almost nonexistent, so there is little need to bother asking for them.
This is not the end of the use of NATF Form 80. If you either suspect, or the pension or military records show, that your soldier was sick, wounded, or disabled in any way, reach for yet another NATF Form 80, fill it out, and staple a note or write across the top " Please send complete medical records." You must do this because, as in the case of court-martial records, medical records are not included in the military records and reseachers in the archives will not tell you that they exist unless you specifically request them."

Jim, the author goes on to explain how he was able to trace his ancestor extensively in the National Archives by just using the extra NATF Form 80's and requisting all of the records be they military, pension, court-martial or medical records. I personally have all of the remaining document records of the pension records for our ancestors (except for the ones who died during the war)---and they contain some very useful information. Mr. Groene gives other examples of how to use the NATF Form 80 in his book--that I consider my Civil War bible. I would advise everyone to read it because it is a small book and easy reading for the researcher.
Eileen

{{{Eileen}}} Thank you dear lady :-) This is great information... All of you ancestor research during Civil War make sure you print this OUT.... It is most helpful and very seldom talked about.... Thanks again Eileen ......
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From: Kujen

Here is a book published in 1992
The Salisbury Prison
A Case Study of Confededrate Military Prisons
1861-1865
Revised and Enlarged
by Louis A Brown
I believe this book is available in most large libraries or through inter-library loan. Mr. Brown pretty well covers all the known facts about Salisbury Prison in a readable fashion and he has unearthed a few little known facts such as the son of the famous Dr. David Livingstone died in the prison under an assumed name while father searched for him fruitlessly.

“Kujen” Neat info... Thanks for sharing it....
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DID YOU KNOW?? ...................................

It was the year 1809................. on a bed made of cornhusks, inside a cabin with just one door and one window and a dirt floor, a young frontier woman bore down hard one February morning and squeezed out from her womb a baby.............. ahhhh “a boy”.
A little later that same Sunday, a nine-year-old cousin asked the mother what she was going to name the baby boy. “Abraham”, she said, “after his grandfather”
The next morning, the same nine-year-old boy held his new cousin for the first time. But the baby cried, and young Dennis Hanks quickly gave him up. “Take him,” he said, “He’ll never come to much.”

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of Interest and Pleas for HELP................

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From: MsGem1000

Hi,
I thought I knew something about the "war between the states" but just learned this week about the "regulators" who where paid to retrieve fleeing and uncooperative soilders on the confederate side. Is this information correct? Thanks, Joyce

{{Joyce}} for that aspect of the Regulators, YES I’m thinking you’re right
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Subj: request for help
From: WCR MAJOR

I am in need of help with regards to marked confederate grave sites at or near Petersburg, Va. My grt-grt grandfather was killed there on June 28, 1864. He was: Private John Barfield, Co. E, 22nd S.C. Reg., CSA. Does anyone know of a comprehensive listing for this area, and for that matter Richmond. Thanks in advamce for any help.

WCR: thanks for the posting.... Hey all, here’s a good one. Where do we find a layout, listing, etc. of the marked Confederate Grave sites in or near Petersburg, Virginia. My only thought is the Veteran’s Administration.....
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From: Shanri

Have enjoyed reading your Weekly Fireside for a long time now but have never been able to join you online. I finally dug up all of my family letters sent from ancestors and other relatives during the war and have them typed some of them up now.....will put the originals away again....someone years ago pilfered all the envelopes and stamps. I would like to share these letters.....mygggreat uncles were young but quite intelligent for the day and some of the letters are very descriptive of their lives and surroundings. The 2 brothers both died in the war...one at Hilton Head and the other at Andersonville Prison. The letters are all dated and signed......beautiful penmanship. Have a total of thirteen, some lengthy, some not.

Please let me know just how I should go about sharing these great pieces of history. Some of my dad's relatives also served.....even my grandfather, but only one left any mail behind and I have not typed that up yet. But I will.

Sincerely, Shirley Ann (Shanri@aol.com)

{{{Shirley}}} What a precious treasure..... You watch out for those! If you have typed some up and as you say are typing up others, GFS Jayne would be most honored to share them during our Letters Songs and Poems nights on the 2nd Thursday of every month. Just send them in to us as an attachment to an email and we can work from that... Thank you for the offer....
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Subj: Excellent CW Book References!
From: DLux2BlueH

I hope you enjoyed the recently past Memorial Day Weekend.
Thank you so much for forwarding those Civil War research reference titles to me! My cousin is an AOL member, and is also doing genealogy. His brother is a veteran & a military history enthusiast. We are trying to document the life, heritage and death of our common Civil War soldier-ancestor. I may recently have discovered yet another CW soldier\ancestor. We are learning such an overwhelming heap of history of our country and ancestors, with the pivotal motivation and information folks like ya'll generously lend. What people these were, to take off at ripe ages like 51, young children at home, farms and jobs in limbo--to fight and die for ideals and futures that, hopefully we graciously reflect, in some remnant!

Thank you for all of your efforts to assist us in the Chat and the "above-and-beyond" achievements through the Weekly Fireside and the log monitoring, file library uploads, etc... You are both Greatly appreciated!

Sorry, Jayne, that the email didn't go through. The current software and system that AOL employs for prevention of spam\scam, etc, unfortunately, only allows 100 addresses to be included in the "allow" list. This limits me greatly, but, hopefully there are still enough "channels" through which I can receive and deliver communication. Thank you for your perseverance and ingenuity! Sharp!
Have a Fantabulous week!

Grateful regards,
Dlux

“Dlux” - thanks for the kind words and the encouragement to us to keep this “bit of lore” going :-) There is just soooooo much material, that in the words of my “Firefighter” neighbor; “It’s just like takin’ a drank out of a firehose”. LOL So we’ll keep putting what we find and are “given” in here for all of you. By the way, check out Eileen’s submittal on the Pension Records up in the “Help Desk”. Now there’s a “Land” few of us have been and it is huge.....
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From: Gen4Jan

Thanks so much for the article in the 5/24 Weekly Fireside regarding the Richmond Military Prisons. My Great Great Great Uncle, William Sanford McConnaughhay with Co. L. 16 Reg't Illinois Cavalry died a prisoner of war at Belle Isle Va on 15 Jan. 1864, so I was extremely interested in the article. Most of his regiment who survived Belle Isle were transferred from Belle Isle to Andersonville where the majority of them died.

My Great Great Grandfather, James A. Donoho with Co. H 42 Reg't Illinois Infantry, fought in the Battle of Franklin. The Adjutant General's Report on the History of Forty-Second Regiment states "November 22, commenced retreat for Nashville, engaging with the enemy at Spring Hill and Franklin, and losing 24 killed, 95 wounded, and 30 prisoners. Arrived at Nashville, December 1. December 15 and 16, engaged in the battle of Nashville. My husband also had a Great Great Grandfather in the Battle of Franklin, although I do not remember off-hand which Regiment he was with. My husband and I stopped at the battle site last fall and toured the Carter home and grounds. I am going to try my darndest to stay awake late enough to attend the Fireside chat tomorrow, but if I don't make it, will certainly look forward to receiving the Weekly Fireside.

Enjoy receiving all of the Weeklys. Thanks a bunch!!!

Janet

{{Janet}} GREAT!!!! Glad that bit of information was pertinent.... Here’s another source to get a much better set of history background on Belle Isle. The book is called “Portals to Hell”, Military Prisons of the Civil War by Lonnie R. Speer. Bulldogtjr (Ted) turned me on to this book and it is by far the best of it’s “ilk” I have ever devoured. This number is not accurate but close.... The book covers over a hundred prisons (Northern and Southern) in surprising detail. The author must have really dug to gather all this information under one book cover.
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From: Seenelson

Thanks very much for the Memorial Day/VietNam Memorial piece. I especially remember Keith Christoffersen, a schoolmate from So. St. Paul, Minnesota, still MIA the last I heard.
Thanks also for the information about Libby Prison in Richmond. I have an ancestor who was imprisoned there--his name was Hannial Hess--or possibly Johan Hess. He is something of a mystery figure; is there any one who could help me locate the names of prisoners there with the last name of Hess, or with whom I could explain the confusion which surrounds him? 
Thanks very much. Cindy

{{Cindy}} Thanks for dropping us a note.... Hannibal Hess really rang on my mind while reading your note... Anyway - if there are ANY OF YOU FOLK THAT ARE DIGGING INTO Libby Prison, and might have run across that name, drop Cindy a line. AND copy me so I can put it in the newsletter.. :-)
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From: BettyLAtw

INSIDE THE WALL..................................

Jim- I seldom cry over sentimental pieces but I did over this one. Thank you very much for sharing it. I do hope that someday the author can be located and recognized for the fine remembrance he or she wrote.

Betty

{{{Betty}}} Ike sure found a treasure on that one :D 
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From: Lorgriff

Even though I haven't been able to get to the Fireside for quite some time, I'm grateful that you've kept me on the weekly newsletter list. The info you provide all of us is invaluable. Many, many thanks.

Thank you for including the poem about the Vietnam Veterans' Memorial Wall is this week's Fireside. Having been to the Wall twice (and having shed tears both times), I was struck by the power of this unknown author's words. Thanks, too, to Ike for sending it on to you.

Kindest Regards,
Lorrie -- lorgriff

{{{Lorrie}}} Thanks for the note.... Ike, we have been getting a “truck load of these”..... Ya did good “ole son”!!!! :-)

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Subj: Photo of MY ancestor!!
From: CRAN8441

Jim,
After I left tonight, I went to keyword and civil war just to look around...never been
there but have heard you all talking about it. Anyway, clicked here and there a bit
then decided to look at the photos...and what do you know, but there was my Gen.
Abner Perrin!!!!! I still can't believe it. I was so excited, I went back into the chat room but there were only a couple people there. They were, however, the most excited two people besides me..how nice they were to share my excitement. They told me I should let you know, so here I am. Am I just lucky or what? This would have never happened if I hadn't been in the chat room and found all you wonderful
people. Many many Thanks!!!
Carol

{{{Carol}}} Yippee!!!!!! What a find.... CONGRATULATIONS to you.. That must have been a shocker.... Heh Heh Oh, :) Our pleasure. Now read this back to yourself and you know why we do this LOL.....
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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT………….

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War".

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "fun" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of.

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, people and social happenings. In addition we dedicate one 
Thursday a month to sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save 
you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look 
on 
the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest in this topic and our Thursday 
sessions, we automatically add you to our Weekly Notices.

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we 
hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, you desire to be removed from distribution of this 
"Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste-haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events******

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Host GFS Jim and our many fill-in friends :)


6/4/98 - OPEN CHAT

6/11/98 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. Don't forget to send in your "Treasures".

6/18/98 - OPEN CHAT

6/25/98 - “An Ending and a Beginning” - GFS Jim I’m trying something a little different on this one....

7/2/98 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. NOTE: I’m doing this early this month as I’ll be travelling the next weeks.

7/9/98 - OPEN CHAT (GFS Jim is on the road)

7/16/98 - OPEN CHAT (GFS Jim is on the road)

7/23/98 - "The Redstick War" A Guest Fireside by two great ladies, GFS Karen and GFS BB.

7/30/98 - OPEN CHAT

We'll See You Thursday……….
Your Hosts
GFH Jayne and GFS Jim

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group
Week ending 14 June 1998

Letters, Songs and Poems Night was just awesome last Thursday. We had more material sent in than we could get to the room. Many, many thanks to all of you that contributed. It was enjoyed by all, and their thanks join ours. 

HERE’S A FORUM ANNOUNCEMENT.....................
This month’s Genealogy Forum Newsletter is featuring , Patriotic Ancestors In The Military. Sooooo If you have an ancestory you want to “Blow Your Horn About”, send the story to GFS Carol “post haste”..... 

Carol writes me “Well it is panic time again. :) I only have one story for our theme which is, Patriotic Ancestors In The Military. I bet we have more than one person around here who have ancestors that served in the Military. <G>“ Here’s you chance :-)

Gratiot Street Prison in St Louis, Missouri, and the Rock Island Prison in Illinois are both posted now in the "New File Postings area". 

I'm going to keep this ANNOUNCEMENT up so you will all be able to plan for it when we get it actually 
nailed on the schedule.. GFS Karen and GFS BB are going to leave the Native American SIG for one 
night and come visit us to give a Guest Fireside on the "Redstick War". The role of the Native Americans 
in the Civil War. We've RESCHEDULED for the END OF JULY, because GFS Karen just "had to go 
play grandma to her brand new grandson", so PASS THE WORD.... This is a rarely covered topic but so 
pertinent to the history we focus on in this SIG..... We're now looking at the 23rd of July. I'll keep you 
posted.

FOR ALL THE 1ST TIMERS - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED YOUR PARTICIPATION..... COME 
AGAIN....

The final continuing series is on the Civil War Military Records which can be found at, or through film 
ordering at your local Family History Centers........ So many of you have been astonished that those 
records are available through the FHCs, that I thought this would also be very useful....

This upcoming Thursday OPEN CHAT. I also had to adjust the schedule for the remainder of this month as the family and I are taking a breather.... Don't forget to check the schedule are at the end of the Newsletter in the "Upcoming Schedule" area.
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THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". 
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. Meeting Logs are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters".
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U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers.............................

The next stage of series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records 
available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

To continue the more Civil War Specific Information...............

"Other Civil War sources.......................

Amann, William Frayne, ed. Personnel of the Civil War. 2 vols. New York: Thomas Yoseloff, 1961. (FHL book 973 M2a). The volumes list the names of local militias and their Union and Confederate Army designations. I also inclues geographical commands of the Confederacy and of generals in the Union Army.

Bibliography of State Participation in the Civil War. 
3d ed. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1913. (FHL film 1,465,569) This lists veteran organizations; regimental histories; and state, county, and town histories (Northern and Southern) that have rosters.

Davis, George B., et al. The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War. Compiled by Calvin D. Cowles. 1891-95. Reprint. New York: the Fairfax Press, 1978, 1983. (FHL book Atlas Stand 973 E7wd.) This atlas was published to accompany the Official Records.

Dornbusch, Charles E., comp. Military bibliography of the Civil War. 3 vols. New York. New York Public Library, 1961-72. Reprint. and Vol. 4. Dayton, Ohio: The Press of Morningside Bookshop, 1987. (FHL book 973 H2dn.) This set is a bibliography of 8,241 regimental and unit histories, narratives, and biographies for both the North and the South.

Faust, Patricia L. ed. The Historical Times Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Civil War. New York: Harper & Row, 1986. (FHL book 973 H26h.) This book has 2,100 entries for war related topics including battles, famous regiments, and numerous biographical sketches of military and civilian leaders

.........................to be continued...


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DID YOU KNOW?? ...................................

Another family..... In 1810, a father imprisoned for owing money, released in the spring of the year. Mother and father consider their situation and decide they cannot afford to remain at the grand family estate in Westmoreland County, Virginia. They travel north by carriage to take up residence in a small house in Alexandria, across the Potomac from the newly established Federal capital.
Young Robert was three years old as his parents passed into "genteel poverty." But not into a gently life. Two years later, his military-hero father, Henry "Lighthouse Harry" Lee, once governor of Virginia and a congressman, was beaten and mutilated by a mob in Baltimore. Recovering with difficulty, left disfigured, broken in spirit, he made his farewells in 1813 to family, commonwealth, and contry ... all for a new life in Barbados. he meant to return soon, and after a few years, he indeed was on his way back. But he fell ill aboard ship, went ashore at Cumberland Island, Georgia, and died there March 25, 1818. Son Robert I. by then was just eleven years old.

************************************************************************************
A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of 
Interest and Pleas for HELP................

************************************************************************************
Subj: request for help
From: WCR MAJOR

I am in need of help with regards to marked confederate grave sites at or near Petersburg, Va. My grt-grt 
grandfather was killed there on June 28, 1864. He was: Private John Barfield, Co. E, 22nd S.C. Reg., 
CSA. Does anyone know of a comprehensive listing for this area, and for that matter Richmond. Thanks 
in advamce for any help.

WCR: thanks for the posting.... Hey all, here's a good one. Where do we find a layout, listing, etc. of 
the marked Confederate Grave sites in or near Petersburg, Virginia. My only thought is the Veteran's 
Administration.....
************************************************************************************
From: FI WATROUS

Alabama Farmer

A farmer in his pickup truck in Alabama was driving across a bridge when he
noticed a man standing on the rail of the bridge ready to jump to his death
in the river below.

The man stopped his truck ran up the the man and said, "Hey fellow, why are
you doing this?" The man replied, "Well, I have nothing to live for."

The Alabama man replied, "Well, think of your wife and children!" The
jumper replied, "I have no wife or children."

The Alabama man then said, "Well, then think of your mother and father!"
The man replied, "Mom and Dad passed on many years back."

The Alabama man then said, "Well, think of General Robert E. Lee!" The
would-be jumper replied, "Who?"

With that the Alabama man said, "Jump you stupid yankee, jump!"

“Ike” Heh Heh I love it.....
************************************************************************************
From: PRISS

I know you are a very busy man but just wanted to let you know how much I enjoy reading "The Weekly Fireside." I wanted to know if you had discussed the prison at Rock Island yet. I don't remember reading about it but could have missed that one. Thanks again for the newsletter and a belated HAPPY BIRTHDAY.
Judy 

{{{Judy}}} And everybody else seems to be just as busy... Heh Heh BUT.... never too busy to thank a nice lady :D YES the Rock Island Prison info has been posted in the “New Files” Postings in the Genealogy Forum AND in the Civil War Files of the Files Library....
*************************************************************************************
From: PinkPJ1934

Thank you sincerely for the information you sent to me. I don't know much about genrealogy or this computer. Getting pleasure out of learning about both.I don't know much about our family roots, and the little I do know is not news worthy and only exciting to me, can't even get family interested in the search,but for some reason I have this strong desire and thirst to search out my history.I relish each new piece of information. Again thank You.
Most sincerely 
Pink pj [ Eleanor ]

{{{Eleanor}}} What a nice note :-) Every last one of us started out the same way, so you’re not alone in your thoughts Heh Heh!!!! What really is exciting is your last statement about your “thirst for History”... We are all addicts in that sense and I’m a believer that the quest we all have for History is a trait and love that makes a difference. We’re very glad you have come to join us :D
*************************************************************************************
From: Seenelson

Thanks very much for the Memorial Day/VietNam Memorial piece. I especially remember Keith 
Christoffersen, a schoolmate from So. St. Paul, Minnesota, still MIA the last I heard.
Thanks also for the information about Libby Prison in Richmond. I have an ancestor who was 
imprisoned there--his name was Hannial Hess--or possibly Johan Hess. He is something of a mystery 
figure; is there any one who could help me locate the names of prisoners there with the last name of Hess, 
or with whom I could explain the confusion which surrounds him? 
Thanks very much. Cindy

{{Cindy}} Thanks for dropping us a note.... Hannibal Hess really rang on my mind while reading your 
note... Anyway - if there are ANY OF YOU FOLK THAT ARE DIGGING INTO Libby Prison, and 
might have run across that name, drop Cindy a line. AND copy me so I can put it in the newsletter.. :-)
*************************************************************************************
Subj: Civil War Hospital In LaPorte IN
From: JMatuch537

I keep missing the Civil War SIG and I am trying to research the Civil War Hospital In LaPorte IN because my daughter and son-in-law now own and live in it. LaPorte Co Historical Society has only a mention of it and I have not had any success in finding any information about it. Could you please Email me some suggestions on where to look?
Thank you
Ruth and Jerry Matuch

Jerry and Ruth :-) Thanks for dropping us a line. I did a quick search through my AOR records and came up dry. But I have some suggestions. The 9th Indiana Infantry Regiment was mustered in LaPorte and maybe the Regimental History MAY have some mention. Another thought is to check the Indiana State Archives in Indianapolis for some mention or writeup. A final possible is the National Archives and specifically the Surgeon General’s Records of the Civil War or any other Medical Information. I’m thinking the state SHOULD have the Medical Records of the hospital and that period “rat-holed” away somewhere.... 

“”””FRANK CRAWFORD (IllinoisCW) do you have any access in your “wondrous” collection of CW material to any Medical Records for that hospital ????? AND not just Frank, but any of the rest of you have any information here, let us know......
*************************************************************************************
Subj: Re: Some Info on the Gratiot Street Prison
From: GENESGENE

How very dedicated you are.You rise above and beyond. The material is interesting, informative, and very much appreciated.I did say he was a civilian, and at long last
the question that has plagued me for years, has been answered, "Why was a civilian buried in a national cemetery? His name, not specifically mentioned ,could have easily been on the list. 
Sure hope none of the regulars are still fighting the civil war, if so, also had many on
side of Union, and many others in Confederacy. 
Thank you again.
Jean

{{{Jean}}} It was our pleasure :-) It’s great fun to hit paydirt. We are not often this fortunate :-)
*************************************************************************************
From: MsGem1000

Hi,
I thought I knew something about the "war between the states" but just learned this week about the "regulators" who where paid to retrieve fleeing and uncooperative soilders on the confederate side. Is this information correct? Thanks, Joyce

{{{Joyce}}} GREAT!!
*************************************************************************************

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT………….

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War".

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "fun" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of.

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it).

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, people and social happenings. In addition we dedicate one 
Thursday a month to sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save 
you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look 
on 
the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest in this topic and our Thursday 
sessions, we automatically add you to our Weekly Notices.

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we 
hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, you desire to be removed from distribution of this 
"Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste-haste".

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events******

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Host GFS Jim and our many 
fill-in friends :)


6/4/98 - OPEN CHAT

6/11/98 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. Don't forget to send in your "Treasures".

6/18/98 - OPEN CHAT

6/25/98 - OPEN CHAT

7/2/98 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. NOTE: I'm doing this early this month as I'll be travelling the 
next weeks.

7/9/98 - OPEN CHAT (GFS Jim is on the road)

7/16/98 - OPEN CHAT (GFS Jim is on the road)

7/23/98 - "The Redstick War" A Guest Fireside by two great ladies, GFS Karen and GFS BB.

7/30/98 - OPEN CHAT

8/6/98 - "An Ending and a Beginning" - GFS Jim I'm trying something a little different on this one....

We'll See You Thursday……….
Your Hosts
GFH Jayne and GFS Jim

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group 
Week ending 28 June 1998 

Whoopee !!!! GFH Jayne is NOW GFS Jayne...... She be promoted. She was just great handling the 
SIG last Thursday night while "Yours Truly" was out in the middle of "Very Hot" Kansas having a few 
words with a rented RV that had decided "it weren't going noooo more"... mumble, mumble. Outside 
of the driving portion of the trip, had a great time and missed ya.... The highlight of the trip, was 
stopping off in-route and meeting Ike and Nancy Watrous (FI WATROUS). We had a late dinner 
together near an "ole river town" (Rochport) overlooking the Missouri River and watched the sun sink 
over the land of Lewis and Clark and the emmigrant water road from St. Louis to Independence.... So, 
Ike and Nancy; "Here's to 'Gentleman Ike' and his 'Gracious Lady'for a grand evening and new 
memories with two fine new friends"..... :-) Heh heh, "Jayne", I got a great big hug!!!!!!! 
You know this is a neat opportunity to encourage all of you to meet your Internet Friends if the opportunity ever presents itself to you. It is such a neat experience. Go for it :D

I'm going to keep this ANNOUNCEMENT up so you will all be able to plan for it.. GFS Karen and GFS 
BB are going to leave the Native American SIG for one night and come visit us to give a Guest Fireside 
on the "Redstick War". The role of the Native Americans in the Civil War. GFS Karen just confirmed 
23 July as our date.... This is a rarely covered topic but so pertinent to the history we focus on in this 
SIG..... Mark your calendars, because you surely won't want to miss this one. 

FOR ALL THE 1ST TIMERS - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED YOUR PARTICIPATION..... COME 
AGAIN.... 

The final continuing series in the newsletter, is on the Civil War Military Records which can be found at, 
or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers........ So many of you have been astonished 
that those records are available through the FHCs, that I thought this would be very useful in your 
research.... 

This upcoming Thursday "Letters, Songs and Poems" night. I know; this is a week early, but I'm on the 
road again for two weeks and didn't think if fair on Jayne to saddle her with that night all my herself, 
although she is very capable, it would be "nasty" of me. Heh Heh.... Don't forget to check the schedule 
are at the end of the Newsletter in the "Upcoming Schedule" area. 
************************************************************************************* 

THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". 
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. Meeting Logs are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters". 
************************************************************************************* 
U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers............................. 

The next stage of series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records 
available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

To continue the more Civil War Specific Information............... 

"Other Civil War sources....................... 

Katcher, Philip. "The Civil War Source Book." New York: Facts on File, 1992. (FHL book 973 M2ka.) 
This book has biographies of important leaders; a state-by-state analysis of state militias; descriptions of 
the Federal and Confederate forces, U.S. Veteran Volunteers, Signal Corps, Sanitary Commission, and 
Medical Department; a section on the life of the common soldier; and a general history of the war. 

Long, E.B., and Barbara Long. "The Civil War Day by Day: An Almanac 1861-1865." 1971. Reprint. 
New York: Da Capo Press, 1987. (FHL book 973 M2leb.) This is a chronology of important military and 
political actions. "Personal note: highly used by this person; excellent source book; indexing is great." 

Navy Department. Naval History Division, comp. "Civil War Naval Chronology." 6pts. Washington, 
D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1961-65. "FHL film 1,550,320.) This is a chronological listing of the 
naval war and important events. 

Sifakis, Stewart. "Who Was Who in the Civil War." New York: Facts on File, 1988. (FHL book 973 
H2sif.) This biographical compendium has histories of 2,500 civilian and military notables of the North 
and South, including 1,008 generals. 

Silverstone, Paul H. "Warships of the Civil War Navies." Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 1989. 
(FHL book 973 M2sil.) This book gives brief service histories of naval vessels and includes many 
photographs of naval ships. 

Civil War Soldiers System...... 

The National Park Service, the National Archives, the Federation of Genealogical Societies, the 
Genealogical Society of Utah, and numerous volunteers are working together to make a computerized 
index to all Union and Confederate soldiers. When completed, this index will be available at Nation Park 
Service Civil War sites. The database will have 5.5 million names (some names will be duplicated 
because of spelling variations and multiple enlistments), will tell whether the soldier was Union or 
Confederate, and will give regiment and rank. It will also give the location of some of the soldiers buried 
in cemeteries managed by the National Park Service and provide references identifying the source of 
information. Eventually information from other sources such as regimental histories, prisoner of war 
records, and burial and cemetery records will be added....... 

"Personal Note: as I'm writting this, I'll fire off an email to Curt Witcher of the Allentown Public Library 
and get details for those of you who would be interested in volunteering to help in this massive (and Oh so 
desired) effort..... Hope to have that information in the next Fireside." 

.........................to be continued... 

************************************************************************************ 
Subj: Salisbury Prison 
From: mass55th@earthlink.net (Katherine Dhalle) 

I'm writing to see if you can make an announcement in the chat room and/or post an announcement in 
the Civil War message board. Yesterday I received a note from a friend who lives in Salisbury, N.C. She 
and her husband are members of the United Sons and Daughters of Confederate Veterans. July 24, 25, 
and 26th, 1998, there will be a symposium on Salisbury Confederate Prison. It will be held at several 
different sites in Salisbury. The Symposium will consist of a banquet, lectures, Union and Confederate 
Memorial Services at the National Cemetery and a walking tour of the prison site, along with tours of 
Josephus Hall House (Confederate Surgeon's Home) and the Rowan Museum. 

Registration fee: $50.00. This includes Refreshments, banquet, lectures, exhibits, memorial services, and 
the tours. Checks should be made out to: Robert F. Hoke Chapter, No. 78, UDC and can be mailed to: 
P.O. Box 5093, Salisbury, N.C. 28144. A contact phone number is: 704-636-6102. Email contact: 
bogles@rocketmail.com. Seating is limited to the first 100 people. They are trying to locate 
descendants of Confederate Prison guards and the Union men incarcerated there. 

Accommodations and directions to Salisbury can be found at: 
www.visitsalisburync.com/ or call 800-332-2343. 

{{{{{{Kathy}}}}}} Thanks for this news.... We'll put it in the "Fireside" for all to benefit from. For 
any that have the information Kathy has stated or if you're interested in attending, check the phone 
contacts, email addresses, etc. above and give'um "a ring"!!!!! 
************************************************************************************ 
DID YOU KNOW?? ................................... 

For the second time in four years, South Carolina acted to nullify tariffs imposed by the Federal 
government in Washington. Andrew Jackson, president at the time, was on the Federal side of the issue, 
while his vice president, South Carolina's own John C. Calhoun, was on the other side -- so much so that 
he resigned the vice-presidency to carry on the fight in the U.S. Senate. For months the air was full of 
impassioned, dangerous words for the still-young Republic: nullification, states' rights ... secession. 
After winning reelection in 1832 with Martin Van Buren of New York as his ticket mate, 
Tennessee's "Old Hickory" still had to deal with the South Carolina thorn in his side. By now, the 
disgruntled state had canceled its earlier nullification actions, only to try another -- this time to nullify 
congressional action authorizing the use of Federal force against the state. 
Here was a most delicate dilemma for President Jackson. In the midst of deliberations with 
Cabinet members, senators, and others, he called for a faithful comrade-in-arms from old wars against the 
Creek Indians in Alabama and the British at New Orleans. Closeted in the White House, they shared a 
decanter of whiskey and talked of old times and new ... and new issues. Like the thorny nullification 
issue.... 
To Sam Dale, Jackson said, "They are trying me here; you will witness it; but by the God in 
heaven, I will uphold the laws." 
Dale said he hoped things would go right. Whereupon Jackson slammed his hand down on a 
table so hard he broke a pipe and replied, "They shall go right, sir!" 
It wasn't long after Dale's visit that Andrew Jackson sent fighting ships to Charleston Harbor, 
denounced any state's pretension to rights of nullification or secession, and on December 10, 1832, issued 
his Proclamation on Nullification, after which the storm died down for the time being. 
In Illinois, meanwhile, a country lawyer named Abraham Lincoln read Jackson's Proclamation 
most carefully. He would read it again when composing his inaugural address of 1861. 

************************************************************************************ 
A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................ 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of 
Interest and Pleas for HELP................ 

************************************************************************************ 
Subj: request for help 
From: WCR MAJOR 

I am in need of help with regards to marked confederate grave sites at or near Petersburg, Va. My grt-grt 
grandfather was killed there on June 28, 1864. He was: Private John Barfield, Co. E, 22nd S.C. Reg., 
CSA. Does anyone know of a comprehensive listing for this area, and for that matter Richmond. Thanks 
in advamce for any help. 

From: NEVassau
WCR MAJOR --GFS Jim--and GFH Jayne,

There may be another way you could find the answers you are looking for and that is by contacting the the 
historian and park ranger at the Petersburg National Battlefield. His name and address is Chris Calkins; 
Petersburg National Battlefield; Box 549; Petersburg, VA 23804......office phone number is 804-732-
6092. Mr. Calkins has written many articles about siege of Petersburg, as well as the battles and raids in 
the summer of 1864 around Petersburg, plus the final days of the Civil War. Chris Calkins was most 
helpful to me with my questions about the location of an ancestor who was captured in June 1864 around 
Petersburg and he would be someone to ask with your questions too. If he would not know the answers to 
your questions, he would be one who could direct you to best sources for help --- but I am betting he 
knows the information you are looking for.

Good luck to you,
Eileen Vassau
************************************************************************************ 
From: AvalonPark 

I am a computor enthuisiast, and enterested in genealogy. In fact, I work one night a week at our local 
Family History Center. I was logged on to the genealogy site today and in following many links, I 
happened on to your monthly genealogy forum news, regarding Civil War SIG, updates. 
In following it through I read the poem that had been sent into you from Rosie(Acadian99). You can't 
imagine how happy I was to read that poem, as I had heard it done by Johnnny Cash one day on my car 
radio and at the time, I wished I could obtain a copy of it. I never really did any investigating to try to 
find the poem, in fact I guess I forgot about it. Thank you, thank you, for including it in your news letter. 
I hope I can log onto your site again on Thursday night. 
Sincerely, Marjorie Parker Avalonpark@aol.com 

{Marjorie} Thanks for the note :-) I really loved that one as well. Rosie comes up with some great ones 
on her "romps" through the internet....... I have added you to our "Fireside" distribution, so at least you 
can get our newsletter, even if you can't make Thursday nights. 
************************************************************************************ 
From: Grimuspf42 

As usual, thanks again for great newsletter. You guys are the greatest. 
Later. 
BAG (grimuspf42) 

"Bag" thanks for the note. These are really appreciated by Jayne and I... Keeps us trying to do better :-) 
************************************************************************************* 
From: CMBarker 

In a message dated 98-06-10 00:31:52 EDT, you write: 

<< This was in retaliation for the 
conditions of Union prisoners at Andersonville, GA. and Salisbury, NC. 
>> 
I beg to differ...the conditions to which the 600 were subjected were far different..in fact were malicious... 
than the conditions facing Union POWs at Andersonville and Salisbury. The real purpose was to prevent 
Confederate batteries firing back at the Union batteries on Morris Island. That purpose was not achieved. 

Mark 

{Mark} - thanks for your update. My statement on that prison was quoted from a National Archives list 
of information on the prison in question. As ever you are my sounding board to stay on the "straight and 
narrow" !!!!!. :-) 
************************************************************************************* 
From: EConard1

Did you know--
that, say, in 1850, census, the respondent who said he was b in IA meant Indiana
and not Iowa? Sometimes genies are poor historians/geographers. I pulled this up
on the LDS Ancestor File, "born 12 Feb 1815, Ottawa, Franklin co, KS." Of course
you know KS did not even become a Territory until 1855. By the way, almost all the
papers ever published in KS exist, are filmed and circulated via interlibrary loan.
But the IA originally stood for Indiana--may steer someone to a real find.
Regards, Erik Conard--Denver

Erik - neat information.... Thanks
*************************************************************************************
From: MMeadPond
-----------------
Subj: Florence Stockade

FRIENDS of the FLORENCE STOCKADE 
The Society for the Preservation of the Civil War Stockade Site, and the memory
of the prisoners and those who guarded them.

* * *

Project to Identify the Soldiers Buried as Unknowns

Many of the dead were marked "Unknown". What a burden of sorrows, disappointed
hopes, and miseries were embodied in that word! Their names, their history all
unknown, uncared-for, they died. Some mother, wife, father, or sister mourns
them, or vainly waits for their coming. Each sound of footsteps at the door may
cause their hearts to throb with expectancy; but no more in life shall they
behold those faces which once gladdened the household. "Sick and in prison,"
they lingered and died, unknown. -- Sergeant Warren Lee Goss, 2nd MA Heavy
Artillery, POW, Florence Stockade. 

The Old Darlington District Chapter of the SC Genealogical Society, in
conjunction with our society, is attempting to identify the 2300 "Unknown" Union
soldiers buried at the Florence National Cemetery. Most, if not all, of these
soldiers came from the Florence Stockade. The project is going very well, with
close to 850 soldiers being identified. Anyone with proof of a soldier dying at
the Florence Stockade should forward that information so that the list can be
more complete. Please include the source of this information as well. All
inquires concerning this project should contact: 

John L. Andrews, Jr.
JAndr45985@aol.com 
PO Box 175, Hartsville, SC 29551-0175 
http://members.aol.com/qmsgtboots/florence.html

* * *

Florence Stockade History: 

The Florence Stockade was in operation for approximately 5 months during the
time period of Sept 1864 through Feb 1865. During this time, as many as
15-18,000 Union soldiers were held captive. Of these, approximately 2,802 Union
soldiers died; 2,300 of whom are buried as unknowns today. It is through this
organization that we hope to educate the public about this little known and very
seldom heard of Civil War Stockade. 

The idea of building a stockade at Florence, SC began when General Sherman,
after capturing Atlanta, posed a great threat towards liberating the Union
soldiers held captive at Andersonville and other southern Georgia stockades. It
was determined that the prisoners had to be moved away from Sherman's advancing
troops. Florence was chosen by Confederate authorities for the site of a new
stockade due to the fact that there were three railroads that centered in the
town, which would ease the operation of transporting and receiving prisoners. 

Major General Samuel Jones ordered Major Frederick F. Warley, who had been
recently exchanged from a Northern prison camp, to construct a stockade in
Florence. Work began with approximately 1,000 slaves being assigned to the
project. 

At Andersonville in late August and early September 1864, thousands of Union
prisoners were told by Captain Wirz that they would all be paroled, except those
who could not walk. The talk of parole was merely a way to keep the prisoners
under control and a way of trying to prevent escape during their relocation. The
prisoners being relocated were divided into two groups and sent to Savannah, GA
& Charleston, SC. Left behind at Andersonville were those who could not walk and
who would be no threat if liberated. Many of these died off rapidly. 

Most of the prisoners that were sent to Savannah would eventually find
themselves back at Andersonville after being held captive in various prisons in
Georgia. Those that arrived in Charleston were mainly held at the Charleston
Race Course, which today is known as Hampton Park. Some were also held in the
jailyard of the Charleston City Jail. Both of these were holding areas for the
prisoners until the building of the stockade at Florence could be completed. 

During the construction of the stockade, there was a rapidly deteriorating
situation in Charleston due to the spread of such diseases as Small Pox & Yellow
Fever. Due to this situation, 5 to 6,000 of the prisoners were sent to Florence
before the completion of the stockade, arriving in Florence on the 14th of
September. The prisoners were assembled in an open field, which made the
possibility of escape a reality and was of great concern to Major Warley, not to
mention the fact that the prisoners were "in a state of mutiny" and could cause
major problems in the surrounding area including the possible destruction of the
railroads. Warley requested assistance from Major General Roswell S. Ripley, the
commander at Charleston, to help with the situation. Due to the imminent danger
involved, Warley couldn't wait and sent out trains to the surrounding community
to gather every available man to assist in the completion of the stockade. Even
though the stockade was far from complete, the prisoners were gathered into the
enclosure on the 18th of September to help gain some control of the situation. 

The design of the stockade was much like that of Andersonville. Upright un-hewn
timbers were sunk about 5 feet into the ground encasing about 23 1/2 acres; six
of which were swamp. The walls of the stockade were roughly 1,400 by 725 feet
and approximately 12 - 16 feet tall. Like Andersonville, a stream (Pie Branch)
ran through the center of the stockade. This stream was slightly larger than the
one at Andersonville, but still proved to be inadequate. 

One major difference in the design changes between Andersonville and Florence is
that a deep trench was dug around the Florence Stockade to eliminate prisoners
from trying to tunnel out. The soil from the trench was then pushed up against
the outer walls of the stockade, which provided a platform for the guards to man
their posts and also added stability to the log walls. Some accounts also state
that there was a trench, as well as a row of boards, used for a deadline. 

An additional difference, comparing Andersonville to Florence, was that the
trees previously within the boundaries of the walls had recently been cut,
leaving many stumps behind, which were used as firewood. There were also several
smaller trees left inside, which were put to the same use. Also, wood was
furnished to the prisoners at Florence, although in small amounts. 

Major Warley had been wounded prior to his imprisonment and the building of the
Florence Stockade. His wounds began to bother him and he requested to be
relieved of his duties at the stockade, being replaced by Colonel George P.
Harrison, Jr. of the 32nd GA by the 20th of September, with Lt. Thomas G.
Barrett in command of the interior of the stockade. Harrison became known for
his fair treatment of prisoners. While, on the other hand, Barrett was known for
being the most brutal. 

By October 12th of 1864 there were 12,362 prisoners at the stockade, with a
death rate of between 20 & 30 per day. At this time, three-fourths of the
prisoners were without blankets, and quite a few were close to being naked.
Luckily, a supply of goods and clothes were delivered to the stockade from the
Sanitary Commission about the middle of October. 

Around the first of November, another supply of clothes arrived at the stockade
from the Sanitary Commission. These items were dispersed to the prisoners who
were in most need of them. Also, around this time, the northwest corner of the
stockade was separated from the main part for the construction of a hospital,
which consisting of rude barracks. 

The prisoners totaled 11,424 for November, and towards the end of the month,
orders came to make out parole rolls for the most severely sick and wounded
prisoners. Any prisoner wishing to be paroled had to undergo an inspection to
determine if his case was severe enough. 

On December 6, 1864, public criticism led to the appointment of Lieutenant
Colonel John F. Iverson as the commander of the stockade. During the middle of
December the prisoners who were selected for parole were sent by rail to
Charleston where they would stay for a few days before boarding the
flag-of-truce boats. After their parole, they were shipped to Camp Parole,
Annapolis, Maryland. Due to these paroles the number of prisoners had decreased
to 7,538 with the death rate decreasing to 6 per day for January 1865. 

Brigadier General John H. Winder, commander of all of the Southern prisons east
of the Mississippi, was at Florence when he died of a heart attack on February
6th, 1865. Due to an inadequate water supply and its close proximity to Federal
cavalry, Winder had been trying to close the stockade at Florence. After
Winder's death, Colonel Henry Forno made preparations to have the prisoners
relocated. Sherman had cut the last railroad link to southwest Georgia, so it
was decided to have the prisoners relocated to North Carolina. After much
discussion about what to do with the prisoners, all able-bodied prisoners were
sent to Greensboro, where they would be paroled and sent to Camp Parole,
Annapolis, MD. Most of the sick and wounded prisoners were sent to Wilmington to
be paroled as well. By the end of February 1865, the stockade was empty. 

The Florence Stockade has not received the same notoriety as Andersonville, but
the conditions were very much the same. In fact, by many accounts, Florence was
worse. It must also be realized that most of the prisoners at Florence had
already survived a hard summer at Andersonville and now faced going through the
winter with little to no shelter. 

* * *

Latest Stockade News: 

Recent developments have been made at the city of Florence's portion of the
stockade site; made possible by funding from the Florence County Historical
Society. Through an archaeologist dig the location of the stockade walls,
hospital location and entrance gate have been located. 

This finding has encouraged the city planners not to develop the area into a
playground and ball park as originally intended, but to make plans to recreate
some of the stockade walls and entrance. Private funding will be necessary and
our society in conjunction with the Florence County Historical Society will
start the process when plans are finalized. 

Negotiations with the owner of the rest of the stockade site continue and we are
hopeful that the whole area can be incorporated into one memorial park
development appropriate to the history involved here. 

The bottom line is, at this point, that at least one-third of the stockade site
has been preserved and protected!! 

On May 30th, we will be unveiling a plaque at the Florence National Cemetery
which points out the location of the burial trenches for the stockade deaths. We
will also be presenting a database of close to 850 names of soldiers who are
buried in the cemetery as unknowns. This database will be available to cemetery
visitors. 

* * *

Documents confirming deaths at this prison are important to us, as are letters
or diaries of both prisoners and their guards. Please join this important
historic preservation effort. 

Charles B. Livingstone "Brand", Vice Chairman
chasbl@nemaine.com 
RFD#1, Box 93, Calais, ME, 04619 207-454-2604 

John L. Andrews, Jr., Treasurer 
307 Kings Place, Hartsville, SC, 29550 
JAndr45985@aol.com 
http://members.aol.com/qmsgtboots/florence.html

{{{Maureen}}} Bless your heart :-) Someone earlier had asked me some questions about this stockade in 
the Fireside. Here's some more information. Hope it helps..... 
************************************************************************************* 

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT…………. 

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "fun" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of. 

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, people and social happenings. In addition we dedicate one 
Thursday a month to sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; we'll save 
you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, either look 
on 
the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest in this topic and our Thursday 
sessions, we automatically add you to our Weekly Notices. 

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we 
hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, you desire to be removed from distribution of this 
"Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste-haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events****** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Host GFS Jim and our many 
fill-in friends :) 


6/4/98 - OPEN CHAT 

6/11/98 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. Don't forget to send in your "Treasures". 

6/18/98 - OPEN CHAT 

6/25/98 - OPEN CHAT 

7/2/98 - Letters, Songs and Poems Night. NOTE: I'm doing this early this month as I'll be travelling the 
next two weeks. 

7/9/98 - OPEN CHAT (GFS Jim is on the road) 

7/16/98 - OPEN CHAT (GFS Jim is on the road) 

7/23/98 - "The Redstick War" A Guest Fireside by two great ladies, GFS Karen and GFS BB. 

7/30/98 - OPEN CHAT 

8/6/98 - "An Ending and a Beginning" - GFS Jim I'm trying something a little different on this one.... 

8/13/98 - "Letters, Songs and Poems" Night. 

We'll See You Thursday Night……….! 
Your Hosts 
GFS Jayne and GFS Jim

 

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