February 2004 Weekly Firesides

Hear Ye ....       Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 01 February 2004

NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line. 

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NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
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First of all, I'd like to apologize to the half of the distribution who received two copies of last week's newsletter....  AOL didn't tell me it had sent the email and it didn't show up in my sent folder so I hit send again and no sooner clicked on it that I got the notice that the mail had been sent...  and yup I got a second notice that it had been sent.....  again.   I'm really sorry that happened.  I'll be more patient the next time  ;)

Thursday and Friday nigihts around the fireside were great this week.  Attendance seems to be picking up and we'd like to see it continue to do so.
This Thursday and Friday, you're all in for a real treat. 
We're going to have a guest speaker!!!    Mygenes/Kay is going to do a story, in the first person about the Confederate spy, Rose O'Neal Greenhow, the only woman killed while on mission for the confederacy.  Yes, she did agree to do it both Thursday and Friday nights, so if you can't be there Thursday you can still catch it on Friday.  Be sure you join us!!  PLEASE pass the word on to your friends

We're still looking for reviews of the Civil War Books you've read and if you have any Civil War URL's you would like to share with the other readers, please send them to  CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

GOOD NEWS!!!!  Many of the Weekly Firesides have been uploaded to the Bits of Blue and Gray website.  I've still got a bunch of them to go yet, but I sure hope you enjoy reading them as much as I've enjoyed re-reading them. 

Now, last week I mentioned some Music to search by....   :D    I know you all must have some favorite Civil War music...   (it doesn't even have to be Civil War)  Tell us a little about it and we'll put it here in the newsletter.

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL: 
to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well. 

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET
AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to. 

Also on Thursday 8-9PM ET: Trace Your Civil War Ancestors in Ancestral Digs. (on AOL only) Join HOST FMLY Wolfrd and HOST FMLY Heathr to discuss ancestral searches from the Civil War period

You can visit the other Genealogy chats by going to KEYWORD:  Parenting Chats > scroll down to Genealogy or Genealogy 101 and click.    Be sure to read the Genealogy and History message boards at   Genealogy Community
 > Genealogy:Boards > Historial People, Places & Times (scroll down to War Between the States) (post your questions on them too!!!)

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"THE BOOK SHELF"
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If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com.  

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http://www.roberteleecwrt.org/reviews.html


Check out some other book reviews at the above website.

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--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs,
and Poems evenings)
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I SENT THEM
by Frank Crawford
Allen Fuller Adjutant-General - Illinois

I was the one that sent thousands of our youngest and best off to THE WAR.
Off to preserve the Union.
Off to fight for tradition.
What tradition is formed in less than a hundred years?
What did we know of tradition?
Of what value was Fort Donelson?
Was it so terribly important in the over-all scheme of things?
Was it important to Abner Jupp?
His mother?
His father?
How was that mound of dirt by that Southern river Important to Miss Mary Ann Ketchum?
She only loved young Abner.
Was Pittsburg Landing important to John Ashmore from Coles County?
His mother?
His father?
I was respected in the community for years.
An important state official.
The people - they remember.
Or do they?
Who remembers Abner Jupp?
Who remembers John Ashmore?
I do.
I remember them all.
Lucian Hathaway. Bernard McLaughlin
They died at Andersonville.
There are others from Boone County still there.
I remember.
Elisha Strong.
George Taylor.
Hiram Coleman.
And ... and ...
Who was that other lad?

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DID YOU KNOW?
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Engagements and Battles
from "Civil War Trivia and Fact Book"
by Webb Garrison

Engagements between Union and Confederate troops were spread across the nation.  Below are the states and the number of engagements that took place in them:

Alabama, 78
Arizona, 4
Arkansas 167
California 6
Colorado 4
Dakota Territory 11
District of Columbia 1
Florida 32
Georgia 108
Idaho 1
Illinois 1
Indiana 4
Indian Territory 17
Kansas 7
Kentucky 138
Louisiana 118
Maryland 30
Minnesota 6
Mississippi 186
Missouri 244
Nebraska 2
Nevada 2
North Carolina 85
New Mexico 19
New York 1
Oregon 4
Pennsylvania 9
South Carolina 60
Tennessee 298
Texas 14
Utah 1
Virginia 519
Washington 1
West Virginia 80

.............and there you have it 

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THE HELP DESK

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Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom?? 
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if
some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
quesiton, please let us know.

Folks, this is YOUR place to ask questions... 
please feel free to use it...  send them to
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

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Weekly Web Sites we've received -
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If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

From:   Bitsobluengray@aol.com

This came in one of the maillists I belong to... 
VIRGINIA: Walking tour recounts Civil War battle in 'Cold Mountain'
http://www.dailypress.com/news/local/virginia/dp-trv--travel-petersbur0120jan20,0,2995404.story?coll=dp-headlines-virginia

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From: Violetptter 

Sons of the South
http://www.sonsofthesouth.com/


Note from Jayne:  Yes, I know, the site sounds like it would be Civil War related, but it isn't, it's the name of a band, but it's worth a visit to the site just to see the "eyes"   <GRIN>

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From: IllinoisCW

The Civil War Message Board Portal
http://www.history-sites.com/

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FROM OUR READERS
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A family story shared with me by Michael Cusack

This is a very short extract of verbal family history from my Grannie Kelly who was a Forrest from East Anglis by birth. In Brief she said that the family came from Holland to drain the fens and worked with the Duke of  Bedford.  That they took the name Forrest. One of the family became an Admiral and rich. He got lands in Jamaica.  Poor relatives were given the job of overseers in the Jamaican Plantation.  The plantation managers/overseers used to hate the arrival of the factors from London as they used to leave them [by price fixing] with insufficient to 'feed the people'.  After the abolition of slavery, both classes were at their wits end how to live, the ex-slaves suffering in particular as thay were deprived without thought for their lives of' the certainty of their former unfree state. The Family tried to work the plantation but gave up.  Some land was given to former slaves and the family determined to emigrate to the Southern States of USA.  Several former slaves members of the household mostly volunteered to go with the family.  These remained as free servants and show the family's attitude to the household which many commentators expected to be more distant and based on slavery. I think all the family's servants were free men and women even in the Slave States. 
Certainly I have come across and lost an internet anectdote of a lecturer/professor descendant of these folk that speaks highly of the Forrests the gentleman was descendant of NB Forrest's war time servant.  There was a soldier in the family who rose to be a Cavalry General.  He broke out of a siege.  He fought on.  He fought to the end of the Civil War.  After the end of the war he gave his lands to his servants and former slaves.
The Union troops drove these people off the lands thay had been given saying "you are free now".
Some people came to him [I think from the early origins of what is now the Democratic Party] because the new Regime was importing Workers from the North and using cheaper black labour in former poor whites jobs. He became the first president of their organization.  He later dissolved that organization because he did not approve of their conduct towards black people.  He was offered an estate in Norfolk by relatives but had to decline as he had lost all his money and lands in and after the Civil War.

((((Michael))))  Thanks so much for sharing this with us. 

If you have a story to tell, please send it to us. 
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

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A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
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NEW!!  JLawson656@aol.com has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email.

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GandMS@aol.com  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com  

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MOM611@aol.com said she has a book on the men of the
9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

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Nanatnt2@aol.com has a book on the
85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

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OhioSoldiers@aol.com Has a book with the
Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

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Bitsobluengray@aol.com has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

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If anyone is doing
Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com   Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you.

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If YOU have a
Civil War Ancestor, Kevin/frye@gnat.net  does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html

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If YOU have a question regarding
Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com   Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com 

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"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
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If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html


February 7  11 AM - 3 PM   Frederick, MD  - Living History 
Confederate Surgeon presentation by Jason Grabill, 11-3, National Museum of Civil War Medicine, Frederick. Demonstration, discussion of Civil War era surgical practices, techniques, challenges.
 
For more information, contact:
(301) 695-1864


February 7   Elizabeth City, North Carolina - Living History
Civil War Naval Living History, Museum of the Albemarle, Elizabeth City. Encampment, demonstrations, lectures & displays including artillery, shipbuilding, navigation, medical.
 
For more information, contact:
Museum of the Albemarle, (252) 335-1453, howard.draper@ncmail.net


February 7  Philadelphia, PA  Lincoln Day Annual Lincoln Day Parade and Honor Ceremony, Union League of Philadelphia. Participants meet by 11 a.m. in General Meade Room. Free luncheon, honor ceremony, parade through the city to Lincoln Monument, reception. No charge. Bring wreaths, music, colors. Military, civilians welcome.
 
For more information, contact:
registration, (215) 587-5592, (215) 204-5452, mundyj@unionleague.org
, andy.waskie@temple.edu

February 10  7 PM  Tuesday  The Second Annual "Prelude to Olustee" will be presented by the Capt. Winston Stephens Camp of the Sons of Confederate Veterans at the Baker County Courthouse, 339 E. Macclenny Ave in Macclenny, Florida.  Topics include their Heritage Highway Project, Camp Milton, and a presentation of War Between the State photographs.  The Baker County Historical Society will host the event and provide refreshments.  Admission is free.  For more information call  (912) 843-8205.  (Sent to me by JAXTAG)

February  13 - 15   8 am - 4 pm  Olustee Battle Historic  State Park near Lake City, FL
140th Anniversary Battle of Olustee Reenactment at Olustee Battle Historic State Park near Lake City. 8-4 daily. Battles Saturday & Sunday, overnight cavalry campaign. Full-scale artillery, infantry, cavalry. Recruiting for 8th & 35th USCT, 54th Massachusetts. Ladies’ tea, civilian activities, medical demonstration, storytelling, Friday Education Day, period music, church services, evening ball for reenactors. No reenactor fee.
 
For more information, contact:
(386) 397-7009 or (386) 758-0400, Martha.J.Nelson@dep.state.fl.us
; http://extlab7.entnem.ufl.edu/Olustee/

February  14 - 15  Roanoke Island Festival Park, Manteo, NC 
4th annual living history weekend commemorating 142nd anniversary of the Battle of Roanoke Island at Roanoke Island Festival Park in Manteo. After February 1862 victory the Union established camps and a freedmen’s colony. Saturday 10-5, Sunday 11-3. Soldiers, sailors, artillery demonstrations, period crafts, presentations, lectures, children’s activities. Admission free for park ticketholders, $5 donation per family suggested for others.
 
For more information, contact:
(252) 475-1500.


February 20 - 22 
South Carolina,  Reenactment of "The Battle of Aiken"  commemorating the anniversary of Sherman's march through South Carolina. Located 20 miles east of Augusta, Ga., off I-20 at Route 19 exit. Encampments, demonstrations, two battles. More info: http:??www.battleofaiken.org  or 803-641-1111.

March  5-7 Battle of Hampton Roads Weekend at the Mariners' Museum in Newport News. Living history, nationally known speakers, a boat tour of Hampton Roads, Civil War costume party, behind-the-scenes tour of the USS Monitor conservation area and much more for families at this annual event. Various price structures are available for all or part of the weekend activities beginning at $16/adults. Three-day packages available for $85/adults. Boat tour additional $40/adults. For details, contact the museum at 757-591-7793 or email info@mariner.org.

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Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
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Time: 
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

February 5 & 6, 2004 -
We're going to have a guest speaker!!!    Mygenes/Kay is going to do a story, in the first person about the Confederate spy, Rose O'Neal Greenhow, the only woman killed while on mission for the confederacy.  Be sure you join us!!!!!!  

February 12 & 13, 2004 - Our special Songs letters and poems nights.  If you would like to share something sent from your ancestor during the war, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

February 19 & 20, 2004 - OPEN CHAT

February 26 & 27, 2004 - To be Announced


We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night. 

Jayne and Bill

Hear Ye ....       Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 08 February 2004


NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com  saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line. 

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NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
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What a great time we had Thursday and Friday when Mygenes/Kay told us a great first person story about Rose O'Neal Greenhow, and she did do it both nights too!!  What a trooper!!!   Thanks (((((Kay)))))  If you all missed it, I'm sorry, 'cause you sure did miss a good one.  The story generated some great dialog between the members.

We were surprised Thursday night with a visit by my former partner from the old Forum, HOST GFS Jim.  What a sight for sore eyes he was!!!!  Jimmy...  miss you "partner" 

We're still looking for reviews of the Civil War Books you've read and if you have any Civil War URL's you would like to share with the other readers, please send them to  CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

WOW!!  Being a pack-rat has finally proven itself useful!!!!!   When I first visited the American Civil War History Chat Room waaaaaaaay back when, I began printing out the Weekly Fireside newsletters and I've just dug them out.  Some of the Firesides I had saved to disks, some were in my online filing cabinet, and some came from the old Genealogy Forum Archives.  What fun they've been.  There are 41 months there for you to peruse with more coming,  I'm missing a few issues and I'm completely missing April and May of 1999 but I don't think anyone will miss them  ;)  to peruse over again.  I hope you enjoy them as much as I have. 

Now, last week I mentioned some Music to search by....   :D    I know you all must have some favorite Civil War music...   (it doesn't even have to be Civil War)  Tell us a little about it and we'll put it here in the newsletter.

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WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL:  to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well. 

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to. 

Also on Thursday 8-9PM ET: Trace Your Civil War Ancestors in Ancestral Digs. (on AOL only) Join HOST FMLY Wolfrd and HOST FMLY Heathr to discuss ancestral searches from the Civil War period

You can visit the other Genealogy chats by going to KEYWORD:  Parenting Chats > scroll down to Genealogy or Genealogy 101 and click.    Be sure to read the Genealogy and History message boards at   Genealogy Community > Genealogy:Boards > Historial People, Places & Times (scroll down to War Between the States) (post your questions on them too!!!)

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"THE BOOK SHELF"
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If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com.  

While I haven't received any book reports from anyone,  our guest speaker did give us three sources for her talks about "Rose" 

1.  Spy for the Confederacy: Rose O'Neal Greenhow
by Jeanette Covert Nolan

2.  Confederate Spy: Rose O'Neale Greenhow
by Nash K. Burger

3.  Rebel Rose: Life of Rose O'Neal Greenhow,  Confederate Spy
by Ishbel Ross

* * * * * * * * * *

http://www.roberteleecwrt.org/reviews.html

Check out some other book reviews at the above website.

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--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs,
and Poems evenings)
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

The words are by Henry Washburn.
The melody was written in 1862
by George F. Root (1820-1895).

THE VACANT CHAIR

We shall meet, but we shall miss him
There will be one vacant chair
We shall linger to caress him
While we breathe our evening prayer;
When a year ago we gathered
Joy was in his mild blue eye,
But a golden chord is severed
And our hopes in ruin lie.

Chorus
We shall meet, but we shall miss him
There will be one vacant chair
We shall linger to caress him
While we breathe our evening prayer.

At our fireside, sad and lonely,
Often will the bosom swell,
At remembrance of the story
How our noble Willie fell;
How he strove to bear our banner
Through the thickest of the fight,
And uphold our country's honor
In the strength of manhood's night.

Chorus

True, they tell us wreaths of glory
Ever more will deck his brow,
But this soothes the anguish only
Sweeping o'er our heartstrings now.
Sleep today, Oh early fallen,
In thy green and narrow bed,
Dirges from the pine and cypress,
Mingle with the tears we shed.

Chorus

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DID YOU KNOW?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

Union General Albin Francisco Schoepf, 1822 - 1886 was a graduate of the Vienna military academy and a Prussian officer, he went to Hungary to fight under Kossuth in 1848 and was exiled to Turkey, where he fought with and instructed the Ottoman Army.  He emigrated to the US, where he worked with the US Coast Survey and Patent Office and was commissioned B.G. USV 30 Sept -61.  He then commanded in the Army of Ohio 1st Brigade (Nov.-Dec. '61); 1st Brigade, 1st Div. (2 Dec. '61-29 Sept. '62) and 1st Div III (Sept.-Nov. '62) at Perryville where his performance was mediocre. He was then relegated to minor commands after the battle and became Commandant of Fort Delaware Prison.  Mustered out in 1866.

.............and there you have it

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THE HELP DESK
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom?? 
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if
some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
quesiton, please let us know.

Folks, this is YOUR place to ask questions... 
please feel free to use it...  send them to
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com
 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Weekly Web Sites we've received -
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com 

From:   Bitsobluengray@aol.com 

The Civil War History o John (Jens) Ritland, 32nd Iowa
http://members.cox.net/jritland/indes.html 

Lost Diaries of the American Civil War - Corporal Timothy J. Regan's Diaries
http://www.lostdiaries.com/index.htm 

Causes of the Civil War
http://members.aol.com/jfepperson/causes.html 

Biographies
http://www.nps.gov/pete/mahan/edubios.html 

Elmira and Salisbury Prisons
http://www.bitsofblueandgray.com/february2004.htm 

The monthly column on the Bits site tells about each of the two prisons, statistics and horrors and was written by Kathy Dhalle who was a host in our Civil War History chatroom before I was. 

* * * * *
From Kevin Frye
Andersonville Revisited
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/Marchevents.html 

* * * * *
From: IllinoisCW

The Civil War Message Board Portal
http://www.history-sites.com/ 

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FROM OUR READERS
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The Battle of Pea Ridge( also known as the Battle of Elkhorn Tavern
shared with us by Ted Fisher. 

Located in the North-west corner of Arkansas just South of the Missouri border, Pea Ridge was to be the largest battle of the Trans- Mississippi theater of the Civil War. The commanders were:
Confederate
   Major General Earl Van Dorn- this battle was to tarnish Van Dorns reputation with many Confederates refusing to serve under Van Dorn's command because of his treatment of the troops. Van Dorn had some small cavalry victories thereafter but was killed by a jealous husband after an affair with the man's wife approximately 14 months later.

   Brig. General Albert Pike- commanded the Confederate Indians who fought at Pea Ridge. Their performance limited to routing two cavalry companies and joining victorious Confederate cavalrymen who had captured 3 Union Cannon. When Union cannon fire forced them to take cover in the woods, the Cherokee regiments were held in reserve for the remainder of the battle. Van Dorn refused to acknowledge Pike in his official report.

   Brig. General Sterling Price- commander of the Missouri State Guard, who had been driven out of Missouri by the Federals.

   Brig. General Ben McCullough- former head of the Texas Rangers who had teamed up previously with Price at Wilson's Creek, but their relationship was stormy, mainly because McCullough was indifferent to Missouri's fate and his low opinion of Price's State Guard

Union
   Brig. General Samual R. Curtis- Union commander, who later won promotion for his performance at Pea Ridge.

   Brig. General Franz Sigel- Curtis's second in command. Genman born Sigel saw the victory at Pea Ridge as sweet revenge for his earlier defeat at Wilson's Creek at the hands of Price and McCullough.

The battle was replete with mistakes, the two most prominant being:
   1. Confederate commander Earl Van Dorn's failure to keep his supply train with food and ammunition in reasonable proximity to his troops. As a result, the Confederates ran out of ammunition on the second day of the battle.
   2. Van Dorn's expectation that his troops could endure a 3 day forced march and go immediately into battle. The Texans lagged behind and Van Dorn had to modify his plans into a 2 prong attack. 

   Added to the above as noted in the following National Park Service release was the elimination of the command structure of the Texas wing when the 2 ranking generals McCullough and McIntosh were killed and the ranking colonel captured.

   Previously Van Dorn, McCullough and McIntosh were major figures in the surrender of the Federal Texas Department and it's forts at San Antonio by Gen David Twiggs.

THE NATIONAL PARK RELEASE

Pea Ridge- The Battle That Saved Missouri for the Union Control of Missouri was a prime objective of both Union and Confederate forces during the first year of the Civil War. It was the reason the Battle of Wilson's Creek was fought near Springfield, Mo in August 1861, and it was one of the reasons for the clash at Pea Ridge in March 1862.

The Battle of Pea Ridge marked the end of a campaign that began on Christmas Day, 1861, with the appointment of Brig. Gen. Samuel R. Curtis to head the Federal Southwestern District of Missouri. Acting with more zeal then his predecessors, Curtis began pushing Confederate and pro- Confederate forces out of the state. By mid- February 1862, he and his troops had chased their main opponents, Maj Gen Setrling Price and the Missouri State Guard, into Arkansas.

In the Boston Mountains south of Fayetteville, Price joined forces with Brig. Gen. McCullough's Confederates. There Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn took command of this combined 16,000 man force and on March 4 headed it northward, intending to strike into Missouri and capture St. Louis. But dug in across his path on the bluffs overlooking Little Sugar Creek, not far from Elkhorn Tavern and nearby Elkhorn Mountain (part of the larger Pea Ridge plateau), were Curtis's 10,500 Federals.

Van Dorn knew that a frontal attack against Curtis's troops would be suicidal, so he swung north to come in behind them. He planned to strike at dawn on March 7, but his troops, hungary, cold and weary from the difficult three-day march, arrived hours behind schedule. McCullough's troops fell so far behind that Van Dorn decided to temporarily divide his army. McCullough was ordered to retrace his steps around the west end of Elkhorn Mountain, then turn east to rejoin Van Dorn near Elkhorn Tavern. These delays gave Curtis time to face about and prepare to receive the assault.

McCullough's troops, including two regiments of Cherokee Indians under Brig. Gen. Albert Pike, marched west of Elkhorn Mountain and the Round Top. They ran into an intensive fire that resulted in the deaths of McCullough and Gen James McIntosh and the capture of the ranking colonel. With their command structure practically destroyed, McCullough's men scattered from the field.

The other prong of the attack fared considerably better. Attacking east of Elkhorn Mountain, Price's Missourians slowly but steadily pushed the Federals back, until, at nightfall, they held Elkhorn Tavern and the critical Telegraph and Huntsville roads. During the night the survivors of McCullough's Leetown fight joined them.

On the morning of March 8 Curtis counterattacked in the tavern area. His massed artillery severely damaged the Confederate line and his concerted infantry and cavalry attacks began to crumple their defenses. Still, the Confederates held. By mid-morning, however, Van Dorn realized that his ammunition was running short and he ordered his troops to withdraw. The battle of Pea Ridge was over. Missouri was in Union hands, and most of the Union and Confederate troops moved east of the Mississippi to fight in other campaigns.

PEA RIDGE TODAY
There is a fine visitor's center where you can view a 30 minute motion picture of the battle which includes excerpts from memoirs of the participants. Touring the battlefield can be done by car, with explanatory plaques along the road. A replica of Elkhorn Tavern has been built on the original site ( the original was burned by guerrillas after the battle). At the time of my visit, park rangers were clearing trees from the original tavern pastures as well as fields of fire for the cannon. Per the head ranger, currently there are over 200 trees to the acre where there were 8-12 trees to the acre at the time of the battle. The intent is to restore the battlefield to it's 1862 condition. It should also help in reducing the plague of tent caterpillers currently infesting the trees. An additional historical fact- one of the roads bi-secting the park was used by the Indians Trail of Tears. A visit is well worth your while
                                        
Ted Fisher

((((((Ted))))))  Thank you so much.  Folks we have others Ted has sent to follow in subsequent weeks.. 

If your ancestor has a story to tell, please send it to us. 
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

NEW!!  JLawson656@aol.com  has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email.

GandMS@aol.com
  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com   

MOM611@aol.com  said she has a book on the men of the 9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

Nanatnt2@aol.com  has a book on the 85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

OhioSoldiers@aol.com
  Has a book with the Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

Bitsobluengray@aol.com
  has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

If anyone is doing Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com    Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you.

If YOU have a Civil War Ancestor, Kevin at frye@gnat.net   does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html 

If YOU have a question regarding Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com    Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com 

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html

February 10  7 PM  Tuesday  The Second Annual "Prelude to Olustee" will be presented by the Capt. Winston Stephens Camp of the Sons of Confederate Veterans at the Baker County Courthouse, 339 E. Macclenny Ave in Macclenny, Florida.  Topics include their Heritage Highway Project, Camp Milton, and a presentation of War Between the State photographs.  The Baker County Historical Society will host the event and provide refreshments.  Admission is free.  For more information call  (912) 843-8205.  (Sent to me by JAXTAG)

February  13 - 15   8 am - 4 pm  Olustee Battle Historic  State Park near Lake City, FL
140th Anniversary Battle of Olustee Reenactment at Olustee Battle Historic State Park near Lake City. 8-4 daily. Battles Saturday & Sunday, overnight cavalry campaign. Full-scale artillery, infantry, cavalry. Recruiting for 8th & 35th USCT, 54th Massachusetts. Ladies’ tea, civilian activities, medical demonstration, storytelling, Friday Education Day, period music, church services, evening ball for reenactors. No reenactor fee.
  For more information, contact:
(386) 397-7009 or (386) 758-0400, Martha.J.Nelson@dep.state.fl.us; http://extlab7.entnem.ufl.edu/Olustee/

February  14 - 15  Roanoke Island Festival Park, Manteo, NC 
4th annual living history weekend commemorating 142nd anniversary of the Battle of Roanoke Island at Roanoke Island Festival Park in Manteo. After February 1862 victory the Union established camps and a freedmen’s colony. Saturday 10-5, Sunday 11-3. Soldiers, sailors, artillery demonstrations, period crafts, presentations, lectures, children’s activities. Admission free for park ticketholders, $5 donation per family suggested for others.
  For more information, contact:
(252) 475-1500.

February 20 - 22
  South Carolina,  Reenactment of "The Battle of Aiken"  commemorating the anniversary of Sherman's march through South Carolina. Located 20 miles east of Augusta, Ga., off I-20 at Route 19 exit. Encampments, demonstrations, two battles. More info: http:??www.battleofaiken.org  or 803-641-1111.

March  5-7 Battle of Hampton Roads Weekend at the Mariners' Museum in Newport News. Living history, nationally known speakers, a boat tour of Hampton Roads, Civil War costume party, behind-the-scenes tour of the USS Monitor conservation area and much more for families at this annual event. Various price structures are available for all or part of the weekend activities beginning at $16/adults. Three-day packages available for $85/adults. Boat tour additional $40/adults. For details, contact the museum at 757-591-7793 or email info@mariner.org.

March  13 - 14  Andersonville Revisited.   This unique living history program offers visitors the opportunity to see and experience what life was like at the infamous Civil War prison camp.  For more information about the daily activities you can go to:  http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/Marchevents.html or you can call 229-924-0343 or email frye@gnat.net

Be sure to check out the information regarding Candle Lantern Tours... Reservations are required.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
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Time: 
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

February 12 & 13, 2004 - You got it!!!!    this is our special Songs letters and poems nights.  If you would like to share something sent from your ancestor during the war, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

February 19 & 20, 2004 - OPEN CHAT

February 26 & 27, 2004 - To be Announced

March 4 & 5, 2004 - To be Announced

March 11 & 12, 2004 -Here it is!!!!  Our special Songs letters and poems nights.  If you would like to share something sent from your ancestor during the war, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

March 18 & 19, 2004 - OPEN CHAT


We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night. 

Bill and Jayne  :-)

Hear Ye ....       Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 15 February 2004

NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com  saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line. 

NOTE from Jayne:  I'd like to welcome all the new subscribers we've had over the last couple of weeks.  I hope you enjoy our little newsletter.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
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Well, now......   Last week I told you I wasn't able to locate any April or May 1999 newsletters.....  GUESS WHAT!!!!  I found several of them  :D
I was right!!!!  Being a pack-rat has finally proven itself useful!!!!!   I guess I can honestly say I have the most complete collection of the Weekly Fireside newsletters.   What fun they've been.  I'm going to make some of them PDF files, otherwise I'm going to have a heck of a lot of typing to do since they are only hardcopy..   http://www.bitsofblueandgray.com/weekly_fireside_newsletter_archive.htm

We had a great time Thursday and Friday night.  We shared some poems, a couple of letters and even a ghost story.  Now that brought some great dialog and some of the chatters shared their own "ghostly" experiences.  Do you have one you can share with us?  Just send it to HOST FMLY Jayne@aol.com and I'll include it here in the newsletter. 

Be sure to check out the Websites sent...  there are some real interesting ones there. 

MUSIC:

My former partner Jim use to put some recommended music in the newsletter and I'm more than happy to include a recommendation Jimmy has sent to me  for this week's newsletter: 

" I have a story to tell you about a little known singer who contacted Melanoma Cancer and died in 1996 or 1997.  She was in her mid to late twenties and her only goal in life was to sing.  She didn't care about publishing, or becoming a celebrity, she just wanted to sing.  I believe her few live concerts were at Wolftrap in the Washington DC area and Blues Alley.  After she died, her father and family (at the urging of friends) decided to share her music and took her recordings and published them.  One piece she did was "Over the Rainbow" from the Wizard of Oz, which is currently #1 in England.  I have never heard any singer put so much heart into her singing than this incredible lady does.  I could and do listen to her at least once a day because I just have to make sure what I heard the last time comes across just as good again.  ..........and so far it does.   Her name is Eva Cassidy and the best of the best of her CDs is "Songbird", although I'd highly recommend you don't stop there.  Her "Live at Blues Alley" CD is one where she took Louis Armstrong's "It's A Wonderful World" and made it all her own.  Oh and you'll love what she does to Sting's "Fields of Gold."

 
Enjoy and let me know how you like this "Songbird"......
Jimmy

((((Jimmy))))))  WOW!!!!...  Since you never steer us wrong when it comes to music [or anything else for that matter ;)] I went out and not only bought the "Songbird" album, but I also bought her "American Time"  Awesome music ...  She sounds like an Angel.  "Over the Rainbow" made me cry.  You'll want to hear Eva's version of Paul Simon's "American Tune" and the Beatles' "Yesterday"  Awesome...  just awesome

~~~~~~~

If you have some favorite music, tell us a little about it and we'll put it here in the newsletter.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL:  to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.

"I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to. 

Also on Thursday 8-9PM ET: Trace Your Civil War Ancestors in Ancestral Digs. (on AOL only) Join HOST FMLY Wolfrd and HOST FMLY Heathr to discuss ancestral searches from the Civil War period

You can visit the other Genealogy chats by going to KEYWORD:  Parenting Chats > scroll down to Genealogy and click.    Be sure to read the Genealogy and History message boards at   Genealogy Community > Genealogy:Boards > Historial People, Places & Times (scroll down to War Between the States) (post your questions on them too!!!)

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
"THE BOOK SHELF"
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com .  

Exile -

    the story of Francis Thomas Meagher, the soon to become commander of the Irish Brigade.  Excellent read.

Thanks (((((Jimmy)))))) 


* * * * * * * * * *

http://www.roberteleecwrt.org/reviews.html 

Check out some other book reviews at the above website.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs,
and Poems evenings)
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

Camp Rolla Aug 29, 1861
Phelps  Co. Mo.
Dear Father I received your letter August 28 and was glad to hear from you .   I am well at this present time and hope these few lines may find you all enjoying the same.  We are throwing up breast works, planting big cannon we have 4 -32 pounders  besides some small brass pieces.  regiment after regiment are moving in.  I would like to see  ole ally and the Duck  and all of you.  I am not more than 30 miles from Bootsis .  I think I will go out there before long.  i came very near getting shot the other day by a drunkard.  I was ordered to arrest him he drew a pistol but he got the butt of my -army nmes(this word is unclear)  between his head laying him senseless. to the ground.  Captain Tharckings ( ? not sure of spelling)  was shot through the arm by the Sergent Major, he is under arrest and will doubtlessly be shot.

There is an old secsionist lives near our camp he has a big peach Orchard and the way we rided (raided ) it is a sight .  Such a time as were have @ sprinkling whiskey over in town you never saw-  we discharged about 30 Barrel the other day.
The irish get drunk and fight and cut  one another up  There has never been    ‚one of our company drunk yet  all civil and peaceable
      no more---------------------------
Edmund Andrews

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
DID YOU KNOW?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

Fort Phil Kearny, Wyoming 
by Ted Fisher

While enroute to To Sheridan, Wyoming along Route193 and I-90 which follow what was the Bozeman Trail, we saw signs directing us to Fort Phil Kearny. Being from New Jersey and familier with the career of this outstanding Civil War general from our state, we could not pass up going to see the site. Our visit was well worth the trip, and we discovered the history of the area to be almost a continuation of the Civil War.
Immediately upon the close of the Civil War, military expeditions were carried out by volunteer regiments including the 1st and 2nd Nebraska volunteer cavalry (wanting to be discharged) againt the native Americans. These started with the Powder River Expedition of 1865 and the subsequent Battle of the Tongue River between the Arapho and the Army. At that time the Arapho were a peaceful tribe, and the Army attack caused the tribe to ally with the Sioux and Cheyenne at the Fetterman Fight a year later.
In order to control the northern plains the government decided to build forts along the Bozeman Trail. The following is from a brochure by this Wyoming State Park:
Fort Phil Kearny
1866- 1868
Named for a popular Union general killed in the Civil War, Fort Phil Kearny was established at the forks of Big and Little Piney Creeks by Col. Henry B. Carrington of the 18th U.S. Infantry in July, 1866.

The mission of the fort and two others along the Bozeman Trail, Forts Reno and C.F. Smith, was three-fold: to protect travelers on the Trail; to prevent intertribal warfare between Native Americans in the area; and to draw attention of the Indian forces opposed to Euro-American westward expansion away from the transcontinental railroad construction corredor to the south.
All three Bozeman Trail forts were stockade fortifications, with Fort Phil Kearny being the largest. Enclosing seventeen acres, the fort wall was eight feet high, 1496 feet in length, and tapered in width from 600 feet in the north to 240 feet in the south. More than four thousand logs were used to erect the stockade, while over 606,000 feet of lumber and 130,000 bricks were produced in 1867 alone for the extensive building construction.

During its two year existence, Fort Phil Kearny was the focal point of a violent war between the U.S. Army and the Sioux, Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians opposed to intrusions into the last great hunting grounds on the Northern Plains. Besides the Fetterman and Wagon Box battles, many smaller fights took place in the area.A description of these two major battles follows:

Fetterman Fight

On December 21, 1866, Sioux, Cheyenne, and Arapaho warriors engaged a military force commanded by Captain William J. Fetterman. Ordered to rescue a besieged wagon train, Fetterman's men pursued Crazy Horse and other warriors acting as decoys over Lodge Trail Ridge where over two thousand Indians waited to ambush. The warriors attacked the soldiers, overwelming the separated cavalry and infantry units. All eighty one men in Fetterman's command were killed within thirty minutes. Only the Battle of the Little Big Horn stands as a worse defeat for the United States army and a greater victory for the Plains Indians.

John "Portugee' Phillips

Phillips is known for his heroic 236 mile ride to Fort Laramie for reinforcements following the Fetterman Fight. Undertaken in the deep of winter in the midst of a blizzard, he hid during the day and rode only at night because he passed through enemy territory. He pushed his horse beyond its limit and sacrificed it in the process, completing the ride in just four days.

Wagon Box Fight

Indian forces attempted to repeat the Fetterman victory in Summer 1867. On August 2 about 800 Sioux attacked woodcutters and soldiers camped at a cutting area five miles from Fort Kearny. During the initial stages of the battle, twenty-six  soldiers and six civilians took cover inside an oval of wagon boxes used as a stock corral.

After burning another camp, Sioux warriors launched a series of attacks against the corral. Armed with breechloading rifles, the soldiers and civilians commanded by Captain James Powell held off the massed warriors until a relief force arrived from the fort. Three men were killed and two wounded inside the coral, while Indian casualties were estimated at from five to sixty killed, and five to one hundred twenty or more wounded.

By 1868, the Union Pacific Railroad had reached a point to the west where travelers could bypass the Bozeman Trail forts and they became expensive liabilities. In the Treaty of 1868, the United States agreed to close the forts and the trail. Fort Phil Kearny was abandoned by the Army in August 1868, and burned soon afterwards by the Cheyenne.

In 1963, Fort Phil Kearny was designated a National Historic Landmark. Today, portions of the fort site and the Fetterman and Wagon Box battlefields are included within the Fort Phil Kearny State Historic Site boundaries.

.............and there you have it

Thanks ((((Ted))))

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
THE HELP DESK
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom?? 
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if
some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
quesiton, please let us know.

Folks, this is YOUR place to ask questions... 
please feel free to use it...  send them to
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Weekly Web Sites we've received -
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com

From:   Bitsobluengray@aol.com
This came from the CIVIL-WAR-L@rootsweb.com mail list

From: "M. Patrick Goad" <skedaddle@pddoc.com>

We've got a new section to our site which is on the explosion of the steamer
Sultana.  There are 5 reports from the Army's official records as well as
other official record correspondence relating to the event.  We'll be adding
some more information over the next few days as well.

The Sultana section of our site is at http://www.pddoc.com/skedaddle/049  

The first issue of our e-Journal is at
http://www.pddoc.com/skedaddle/skedaddle-journal.htm 

Thanks
M

=~=~=~=
Letters of the Civil War
http://www.letterscivilwar.com/ 

* * * * * * * * * *
From:  Cyndi's list of new websites

=~=~=~=
URL:     http://www.ok13.com/websites/mypahoa/venite/genealogy/82band.htm 
TITLE:     82nd Regiment Pa. Vol. Regimental Band
DESCRIPTION:     Muster List of the 82nd Regimental Band of the
Pennsylvania Volunteers from Samuel Bates History.

=~=~=~=
URL:     http://www.ok13.com/websites/mypahoa/venite/genealogy/82officers.htm 
TITLE:     82nd Regiment Pa. Vol. Field and Staff Officers
DESCRIPTION:     Muster List of the Officers of the 82nd regiment of
Pennsylvnia Volunteers   from Samuel Bates History.

~=~=~=
URL:     http://www.ok13.com/websites/mypahoa/venite/genealogy/54th.htm 
TITLE:     3rd Regiment 54th Pa. Reserves - Co D
DESCRIPTION:     Musters of the 3rd Regiment, 54th Reserves, Co. D, Pa.
Vol. including wounded, killed, desertions, transfers, from Samuel Bates
History of the Pennsylvania Volunteers.

=~=~=~=
URL:     http://www.ok13.com/websites/mypahoa/venite/genealogy/32nd.htm 
TITLE:     32nd Reg. Pennsylvania Volunteers Co. H
DESCRIPTION:     Musters of the 32nd Regiment, Co. H, Pa. Vol. including
wounded, killed, desertions, transfers, from Samuel Bates History of the
Pennsylvania Volunteers.

=~=~=~=
URL:     http://alabamascv.org 
TITLE:     Alabama Division Sons of Confederate Veterans
DESCRIPTION:     As members of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, we are
charged with the defense and vindication of the Cause for which we
Southerners fought through 1861-1865. The organization was created in 1896
by the United Confederate Veterans, and its mission was perfectly summed up
by General Stephen D. Lee when he said to the then-new SCV in 1906:"To you,
Sons of Confederate Veterans, we submit the vindication of the Cause for
which we fought; to your strength will be given the defense of the
Confederate soldier's good name, the guardianship of his history, the
emulation of his virtues, the perpetuation of those principles he loved and
which made him glorious and which you also cherish. Remember, it is your
duty to see that the true history of the South is presented to future
generations.".

* * * * * * * * * *
From:  Dashmom
The American Civil War Homepage
http://sunsite.utk.edu/civil-war/warweb.html#letters 

* * * * * * * * * *
From Kevin Frye
Andersonville Revisited
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/Marchevents.html 

* * * * * * * * * *
From:  MM3C11259

Casualties in the Civil War
http://www.civilwarhome.com/casualties.htm 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
FROM OUR READERS
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NOTE from Jayne:  While working on the Weekly Fireside project, there were many, many really great stories.  This was one of them.

Subj: Civil War Story - 1997
From: KINFOLK919
My son, age 32 is a real civil war enthusiast.  He named his son, ROBERT EDWARD.  He has read hundreds of civil war books.  He gave me a video of Gettysburg with songs about the civil war.  He had some of the songs on a tape so he can play them in his car.

Here is the story,

Last May he took me to Gettysburg for my first visit.  We stayed there for two and a half days looking at all the sites and he told me all about who and what happened there.
As he was driving past the many monuments, I was taking movies with his camcorder and he was playing the civil war songs on the car cassette.

When we got home we played the video for his sister, (age 23), suddenly she said stop.  Back it up.  We did and she said look at the face.  I had been taking the video through the windshield and as we rode past the row of monuments you could see a ghostly face looking back at us.  Its eyes and nose were clear and the shape of it face was faint.  Its head leaned to the right, then slowly to the left.  It kept looking at us until we were past the row of monuments.  That, plus the sad music that was being played gave all of us a chill.  You wouldn't believe how real it looked.

Explanation;
The auto focus was on and the lens was moving in out as we rode down the row of monuments making the face appear to lean right and left and the eyes and nose were just caused by sunlight on the windshield.  That is how he explained it.  He will never convince his sister.  She still says it was a ghost of Gettysburg.

As for me, I hope my son was right.

See you next week,
KinFolk919

((((Kinfolk)))))    LOL  and I hope your daughter was right  ;) 
____________________________

If your ancestor has a story to tell, please send it to us. 
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

JLawson656@aol.com  has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email.

GandMS@aol.com
  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com  

MOM611@aol.com
  said she has a book on the men of the 9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

Nanatnt2@aol.com
  has a book on the 85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

OhioSoldiers@aol.com
  Has a book with the Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

Bitsobluengray@aol.com
  has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

If anyone is doing Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com    Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you.

If YOU have a Civil War Ancestor, Kevin at frye@gnat.net   does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html

If YOU have a question regarding Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com   Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com 

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html

February 20 - 22
  South Carolina,  Reenactment of "The Battle of Aiken"  commemorating the anniversary of Sherman's march through South Carolina. Located 20 miles east of Augusta, Ga., off I-20 at Route 19 exit. Encampments, demonstrations, two battles. More info: http:??www.battleofaiken.org  or 803-641-1111.

February 21 - Special program, Gen. JEB Stuart birthday program at Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond. 10 AM. Free.  Email dhakenson@cox.net for more info.

March  5-7 Battle of Hampton Roads Weekend at the Mariners' Museum in Newport News. Living history, nationally known speakers, a boat tour of Hampton Roads, Civil War costume party, behind-the-scenes tour of the USS Monitor conservation area and much more for families at this annual event. Various price structures are available for all or part of the weekend activities beginning at $16/adults. Three-day packages available for $85/adults. Boat tour additional $40/adults. For details, contact the museum at 757-591-7793 or email info@mariner.org.

March  13 - 14  Andersonville Revisited.   This unique living history program offers visitors the opportunity to see and experience what life was like at the infamous Civil War prison camp.  For more information about the daily activities you can go to:  http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/Marchevents.html  or you can call 229-924-0343 or email frye@gnat.net 

Be sure to check out the information regarding Candle Lantern Tours... Reservations are required.

March  13 - 14  Living history and reenactment, commemoration of the anniversary of the Battle of Averasboro near Dunn. More info, 910-891-5019 or www.averasboroactivities.com

March 27-28  Living history weekend at Five Forks, part of the Petersburg National Battlefield west of Petersburg. Demonstrations, ranger programs and more. Free. 804-732-6092 or www.nps.gov/pete

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 
Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

Time: 
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

February 12 & 13, 2004 - You got it!!!!    this is our special Songs letters and poems nights.  If you would like to share something sent from your ancestor during the war, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

February 19 & 20, 2004 - OPEN CHAT

February 26 & 27, 2004 - Daniel Sower - Deserter or Prisoner of War? (you decide)  by Frank Crawford

March 4 & 5, 2004 - OPEN CHAT

March 11 & 12, 2004 -Here it is!!!!  Our special Songs letters and poems nights.  If you would like to share something sent from your ancestor during the war, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

March 18 & 19, 2004 - OPEN CHAT

We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night. 

Bill and Jayne  :-)


Hear Ye ....       Hear Ye

"The Weekly Fireside"
of the American Civil War History
Special Interest Group;
Distribution Coast to Coast
Week ending 29 February 2004

NOTE:  If you do not wish to receive the Weekly Fireside, PLEASE send email to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com saying "UNSUBSCRIBE" and they will remove you from the distribution.  On the other hand, if you know someone who would like to receive the newsletter, please have them send Jayne or Bill email with subscribe in the subject line.  

NOTE from Jayne:  I'd like to welcome all the new subscribers we've had over the last couple of weeks.  I hope you enjoy our little newsletter.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
NOTES FROM THE HOSTS OF THE CIVIL WAR HISTORY CHATS
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

More Weekly Firesides have been added to the website.. www.bitsofblueandgray.com.   I still have the job of making some of them PDF files, otherwise I'd have a heck of a lot of typing to do since they are only hardcopy..   http://www.bitsofblueandgray.com/weekly_fireside_newsletter_archive.htm 

Thursday we heard the story of "Daniel Sower, Deserter or Prisoner of War" by our friend IllinoisCW/Frank Crawford.  The concensus of opinion was that he was a POW.  

We also located a soldier for one of our chatters which always makes us feel good.  

Be sure to check out the Websites sent...  there are some real interesting ones there.  

I talked to Jim last night, he said to tell you all "Howdy from the shadows of  beautiful Pikes Peak"

MUSIC:

If you have some favorite music, tell us a little about it and we'll put it here in the newsletter.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
WHAT WE ARE ABOUT
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

OUR FOCUS:  the "History of the American (United States) Civil War," with by-products of laughter, and camaraderie!

OUR GOAL:  to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom"  by talking about the history surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died because of.

Captain Oliver Wendell Holmes of the 20th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, said it so well.  

I think it is a noble and pious thing
To do whatever we may by written
Word or molded bronze and sculpted
Stone to keep our memories, our
Reverence and our love alive and
To hand them on to new generations
All too ready to forget."

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgmental and to address ALL aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (as we know it).

JOIN HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill...    Thursday 11 PM ET AND Friday 10 PM ET in the  Ancestral Digs  Room (on AOL only)   The "program" will not necessarily be the same both nights.  We will still have our  Songs, Letters and poems nights the 2nd Thursday of the month and the Friday following. Watch the schedule below to see what we're up to.  

Also on Thursday 8-9PM ET: Trace Your Civil War Ancestors in Ancestral Digs. (on AOL only) Join HOST FMLY Wolfrd and HOST FMLY Heathr to discuss ancestral searches from the Civil War period

You can visit the other Genealogy chats by going to KEYWORD:  Parenting Chats > scroll down to Genealogy and click.    Be sure to read the Genealogy and History message boards at   Genealogy Community > Genealogy:Boards > Historial People, Places & Times (scroll down to War Between the States) (post your questions on them too!!!)

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
"THE BOOK SHELF"
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

If you have read a great Civil War book you think others should read, I invite all of you (you don't have to be an AOL member to share here in the Weekly Fireside) to send the title, author and a Review of it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com.   

* * * * * * * * * * 

http://www.roberteleecwrt.org/reviews.html 
http://www.cwbr.com/ 

Check out some book reviews at the above websites.


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
--------OUR WEEKLY READING--------
(these items are extracts from our Letters, Songs, 
and Poems evenings)
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

The Story of Sallie
from Tom Gladwell

The stalwart oak tree is the monument of the 90th PA.  It is in the shape of an oak tree shattered by artillery fire. The story goes that during the fight there, the tree was hit by artillery fire and the limbs fell among the men. On the ground was a robins nest filed with unharmed by quite shaken babies. A solider witnessing the scene picked up the nest. Under heavy fire and a great risk to his own life, the solider climbed up the shattered stump and replaced the nest. Bronze accouterments, a knapsack, a rifled musket, and a canteen are slung over one of the shattered branches. Ivy, also sculpted in bronze, has begun to grow up the shattered trunk. At the top  of which is a bronze nest with baby birds resting inside. Perched on the nest, the mother bird watches over her brood. The intention was to symbolize a regeneration of life amidst the debris of battle and the start of a new era of peace and goodwill.

The 11th Pennsylvania monument dedicated to the "heroic dead of the regiment, stands silently atop Oak Ridge at the stop they defended that afternoon of July 1st.  Driving along the row of monuments honoring the men of John Robison's division, you will immediately see a fine bronze statue of a skirmisher preparing to fire sitting atop the 11th PA monument. Few bother to get out and walk to the front where another bronze statue can be found, the statue of a small dog curled up as if sleeping. The dog Sallie was the mascot of the 11th and she too was numbered among the heroic dead  to whom the monument was dedicated.

Sallie had been given to the regiment as a puppy during the early days of the war. Growing up with the men of the regiment, she became a comrade in arms, shearing the marches, the hardships, the extremes of the climate and the dangers of battle. During battles, Sallie was known to take her position at the end of the line of battle, barking as loud as she could at the enemy.  Of a friendly nature, Sallie was said to hate only three things: "Rebels, Democrats, and Woman".

At Gettysburg, the little dog was with the men of the 11th PA throughout the battle of July 1st. During the course of the retreat through the town, she became separated from the unit. Not knowing where they had gone, she remembered where they had been and worked her way back across the field to this ridge and her fallen comrades.  There, amidst the wounded, the dying, and the dead, Sallie laid down and maintained a silent vigil over her friends for the remainder of the battle. After the Confederate retreat a member of the 12th Massachusetts found her still lying among the dead, weak from lack of food, but alive. She was returned to her unit.

Recovering quickly, Sallie resumed her place in the regiment serving faithfully through the balance of the war. On February 6, 1865 within two months of the war's end she was going into battle with her regiment at Hatcher's Run, Virginia. During the course of the fight she was shot through the head and killed.  Such was the feeling of the men of the regiment towards their mascot, that they buried her on the field despite the heavy enemy fire. Years later when designs for the regimental monument at Gettysburg were discussed it was felt only appropriate that their little pet, their friend, and their comrade be memorialized with the regiment.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
DID YOU KNOW?
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

This was sent to me by Ted Fisher...

Sage of Wheatland  

The winter of 1861 was arguably one of the darkest periods in American history. The country was precariously poised for war as numerous southern states had formally seceded from the Union. President James Buchanan, the nation's 15th president, was preparing to leave office. In one of his most telling quotes, the stately Buchanan told President-Elect Abraham Lincoln, "If you are as happy in entering the white house as I shall feel on returning [home] to Wheatland, you are a happy man indeed."

Buchanan was born in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania, a small frontier town located about 40 miles west of Gettysburg. He attended college at Dickinson, a prominent law school in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and later, the life-long bachelor settled in Lancaster in a beautiful estate named Wheatland

Buchanan's political career spanned more than five decades, including stints as a state legislator, United States representative and senator, secretary of state and foreign minister. Undoubtedly, he was the most experienced and qualified politician as the election of 1856 loomed. The 1856 election occurred amidst tumultuous partisanship and sectional fissures that prompted many voters to realign their allegiances. The Democratic Party, which Buchanan proudly led to victory, was quickly dividing itself over the issues of slavery and western expansion.

Buchanan's presidency was wholly disheartening and dispiriting, marked at the core by a dysfunctional cabinet, which ironically, Buchanan had poured much thought into when assembling. But having such a long political career meant Buchanan had numerous political patronage bills to pay upon entering office. Forged in the rough and tumble world of Pennsylvania and Washington politics, he chose to develop "scheming centrist" positions designed to appease all sides. Though he was from a northern state, his political positions were decidedly "anti-antislavery" and "pro-southern" in sentiment. Above all. he was an aristocrat, and he seemingly identified quite easily with the plantation aristocracy.

His meddling in the Dred Scott case, a key Supreme Court ruling favoring the constitutionality of slavery, and his support of pro-slavery factions in Kansas expended a great deal of his political capital. "By universal consent, Buchanan is the worst president in the history of the country," one highly acclaimed historian has written. "Pennsylvania's only president is today not considered much of an advertisement for Pennsylvania," another historian just recently wrote. 

On Sunday, June 28,1863, Buchanan walked down from his house to his favorite spot, a spring on the front lawn which bordered the Marietta Pike. A faint glow lit up the western sky, confirming Buchanan's fears that invading Confederates were burning bridges across the mighty Susquehanna River. Fleeing eastward, many people with carts and wagons packed with their few belongings raced by Buchanan as he stood on the front lawn. Occasionally a rider would pass him, yelling out, "You damned rebel," or "I hope they burn you out." Walking through the oak grove back to the house, Buchanan later related that he felt the "crushing" reality that his life and 50 years of public service had been a failure.

A couple of years later in April 1865, Buchanan sat in a carriage at the train station in Lancaster, only minutes away from Wheatland. There he watched Lincoln's funeral train make a stop along its 1,700 mile journey from Washington back to the president's humble home in Springfield, Illinois.

Source: Civil War Preservation Trust 2003 calendar by Chris Heisey

.............and there you have it

Thanks ((((Ted))))

*  * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
THE HELP DESK
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  

Do you have a question that you didn't get to ask in the chatroom??  
Send us and email and we'll post it here to see if 
some of our readers can help you.  If you get an answer to your
quesiton, please let us know.

Folks, this is YOUR place to ask questions...  
please feel free to use it...  send them to
CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com
 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

NOTE:  I'm going to leave this in here another week.

From:  Phreyor@aol.com

Dear friends: I have an inquiry about a GGG.Grandfather Seth H. Davis. According to his discharge papers, He was a private in Company E, 11th Regiment of the Kentucky Infantry. But I can not find any other records or history on him. Does anyone know anything about this boarder state unit?  Thanks for any help! Phreyor.
 P.S. I love this site and have been learning so much from it over the last three years. Keep up the great work! 

Ok folks......   let's see what we can do for Phreyor...  

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Weekly Web Sites we've received - 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

If you have a favorite Civil War site, please send them to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com  

From:   Bitsobluengray@aol.com 

ShoeString Genealogy
While this isn't Civil War, it IS a great Genealogy Website for those of us who don't have mega-bucks to spend on our genealogy research.  
http://hometown.aol.com/daepowell/myhomepage/ssg1.htm 

~~~~~

Received this on the Civil-War-L Rootsweb maillist
Salisbury Prison
http://www.gorowan.com/salisburyprison/  
http://www.lib.co.rowan.nc.us/HistoryRoom/prison/salsprison.htm  
http://www.salisburyprison.org/  

* * * * * * * * * *

From:  Cyndi's List of new sites

URL: 
http://www.sonofthesouth.net/leefoundation/Confederate_states_America.htm  
TITLE:     History of the Confederate States of America
DESCRIPTION:     This site presents original Harper's Weekly news accounts 
of the formation of the Confederacy, including biographies and other data 
on key Confederate Leaders.

* * * * * * * * * * 
From: DaePowell

US Civil War: Following your Soldier Ancestor
http://www.io.com/~jhaller/acw/acw.html 


* * * * * * * * * *
From:  GLOJET

Yankee or Dixie quiz
http://www.chuckchamblee.com/dom/fun/yankee_dixie_quiz.htm 

(((((JET)))))    Phew!!!   I'm 46%....  just barely into the Yankee territory  ;)  I guess given I was born in SE PA and live in DE, that's pretty good huh.  :D
What fun!!!!   

* * * * * * * * * * 
From:  JAXTAG
Women of the American Civil War Era
http://www.americancivilwar.com/women/women.html  

* * * * * * * * * * 
From Kevin Frye
Andersonville Revisited
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/Marchevents.html 

* * * * * * * * * * 
From:  MM3C11259

Casualties in the Civil War
http://www.civilwarhome.com/casualties.htm 

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
FROM OUR READERS
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

From:  Barb

This Fireside publication is always interesting and helpful, but the most recent edition (Feb. 22) was exceptionally interesting.  I really enjoyed the history of "Battle Hymn of the Republic."  Don't remember hearing that before.
Ya done good, kiddo!

((((((((Barb)))))))))  Thanks so much for the feedback....  Helps let us know we're doing something right.  <GRIN>


If your ancestor has a story to tell, please send it to us.  
     HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
A BIT OF COMMUNITY...  MEMBERS HELPING MEMBERS!!
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * 

JLawson656@aol.com  has access to Pension Records for Civil War Soldiers in Louisiana.  If you need help, send JL an email. 

GandMS@aol.com
  Has a book  Annals of Alexander Hamilton Post, No 182, Department of New York, Grand Army of the Republic, during the years 1184 to 1900, Compiled and Aranged by Past Commanders F. S. Bartram and T. W. Smith, New York, Bartram Press, 126 William Street ---  1900

The list of Names from the book has been in the Newsletter the past two weeks, There are many pictures in the book.  If you think your ancestor was a member of Hamilton Post No. 182  Please email GandMS@aol.com  

MOM611@aol.com
  said she has a book on the men of the 9th OHIO if anyone needs information.

Nanatnt2@aol.com  has a book on the 85th NY Infantry which spent most of their time in Andersonville.

OhioSoldiers@aol.com
  Has a book with the Rosters of the 1st through the 20th Ohio Soldiers.

Bitsobluengray@aol.com
  has Delaware Civil War Union Rosters from two different sources and a book "They Died at Fort Delaware"

If anyone is doing Illinois Civil War research, you may email IllinoisCW@aol.com   Tell him HOST FMLY Jayne sent you.  He will give it priority and see what he can find for you. 

If YOU have a Civil War Ancestor, Kevin at frye@gnat.net   does Volunteer reseach at Andersonville Civil War Prison in Andersonville, GA.  Any research he does is absolutely at NO cost and he is willing to do all he can. There are more than 32,000 prisoners on record from the Union, and quite a few who were held prisoner there as Union regiments from Confederate states. There are also nearly 13000 marked graves of those who died there.  Kevin's focus is dedicated to ALL of those held prisoner during the war, on both sides, as well as all Americans who gave their freedoms for those that we enjoy today.. He just happens to be near Andersonville, so that is where he does his work.
Visit Kevin's site at:
http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/index.html  

If YOU have a question regarding Confederate researching, visit Steve Teeft's website at http://www.dixieresearch.com  Tell him you saw his address in the Weekly Fireside.  Steve@dixieresearch.com

* * * * * * * * * * * * *
"THE TOWN CRIER"
Civil War Calendar!!
* * * * * * * * * * * * *

If your group is sponsoring any events or you know of a great event, please send it to CWWeeklyFireside@aol.com and we will be glad to include it here in our calendar.

You might want to check out this site if you're looking for an event in your area:
http://www.civilwar-va.com/events/events0104.html 

March  5-7 Virginia Battle of Hampton Roads Weekend at the Mariners' Museum in Newport News. Living history, nationally known speakers, a boat tour of Hampton Roads, Civil War costume party, behind-the-scenes tour of the USS Monitor conservation area and much more for families at this annual event. Various price structures are available for all or part of the weekend activities beginning at $16/adults. Three-day packages available for $85/adults. Boat tour additional $40/adults. For details, contact the museum at 757-591-7793 or email info@mariner.org

March  13 - 14 Georgia  Andersonville Revisited.   This unique living history program offers visitors the opportunity to see and experience what life was like at the infamous Civil War prison camp.  For more information about the daily activities you can go to:  http://www.angelfire.com/ga2/Andersonvilleprison/Marchevents.html  or you can call 229-924-0343 or email frye@gnat.net 

Be sure to check out the information regarding Candle Lantern Tours... Reservations are required.

March  13 - 14 North Carolina  Living history and reenactment, commemoration of the anniversary of the Battle of Averasboro near Dunn. More info, 910-891-5019 or www.averasboroactivities.com 

March 27-28 Virginia   Living history weekend at Five Forks, part of the Petersburg National Battlefield west of Petersburg. Demonstrations, ranger programs and more. Free. 804-732-6092 or www.nps.gov/pete  

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *  
Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Time:   
Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
Every Friday Night at 10 PM ET in the Ancestral Digs Room
with hosts HOST FMLY Jayne, HOST FMLY Bill and their many faithful friends :)

March 4 & 5, 2004 - OPEN CHAT

March 11 & 12, 2004 -Here it is!!!!  Our special Songs letters and poems nights.  If you would like to share something sent from your ancestor during the war, please send to HOST FMLY Jayne and HOST FMLY Bill

March 18 & 19, 2004 - OPEN CHAT

March 25 & 26, 2004 - to be announced.

We'll See You Thursday and/or Friday Night.  

Bill and Jayne  :-)

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