CHRONICLES 

OF THE 

GREAT REBELLION 

FROM 

THE BEGINNING OF THE SAME 

UNTIL THE 

FALL OF VICKSBURG 

BY 

REV. ALLEN M. SCOTT, D. D. 

* * * * *

EIGHTEENTH EDITION 

* * * * *

CINCINNATI
C. F. VENT & CO., NO 38 WEST FOURTH STREET
 
---------
1864

Entered, according to an Act of Congress, in the year 1863, by

 C. F. VENT & CO.

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the United States, in and for
the Southern District of Ohio

 

CALEB CLARK, FINE LETTER-PRESS PRINTER,
CINCINNATI, OH

PREFACE 

Common Usage is Law, and Usage says, that he who writes a book must write a Preface. 

The book which is here presented to the reader, gives an epitome or outline of the Great Rebellion.  To enter into detail, would make the work quite voluminous; and it was considered, that at a time like the present, when momentous events are almost daily occurring, the great public cannot detain to listen to a minute detail of incidents. 

At first, the author did not design to give the labors of his pen to the public.  He was amid the stirring scenes of the Rebellion, and though a civilian and an old man, often has he, within the last two years, heard the roar of artillery, and witnessed the evolutions of soldiers going fort to battle.  He commenced the “Chronicles” with no other motive than to beguile the hours of leisure, that, with the loss of business incident to the war, lay heavily upon him.  A few friends saw some of the chapters, and express much pleasure at their perusal.  He was afterwards induced to allow their publication in a Memphis daily paper, and it was soon apparent, that the style was pleasing to the masses, for it was impossible to supply the demand for the numbers of the paper containing these chapters.  Influenced by the anxiety of the populace as thus manifested, the author has revised the “Chronicles,” and added many chapters, and now in the form here presented gives them to the public. 

“Why have they been written in Scripture style?” inquires some honest and inquisitive reader.  I answer, Because the style is quaint, unusual, and from its novelty, calculated to make a lasting impression of the mind. 

But perhaps, it is suggested, that the style is that of the Holy Scriptures, and they its use at the present day, is sacrilegious.  In answer, I will say, that the style was anciently not confined to the Holy Scriptures, but generally adopted in profane as well as sacred writings, and it is yet used in law forms and documents, and no one, I presume, would venture to say that the language in a deed or mortgage, although of the ancient or solemn style, is sacrilegious.  The author venerates the Holy Bible, and takes it as the man of his council, and the guide of his life, and no one would be more averse to sacrilege than himself. 

If it would be sacrilegious to use the form of speech that Moses, and the prophets, and the apostles used, it would be equally sacrilegious to wear sandals or turbans because they wore them. 

In conclusion, the author would express the hope, that this cruel war of brothers—this war against the government of our fathers and the old flag that waved over us in the past, may soon be succeeded by a lasting peace, and that the wonted prosperity and happiness may ere long be fully restored. 

                                                ALLEN M. SCOTT 

Memphis, Tenn., October, 1863.

CONTENTS.

* * * * *

CHAPTER I
Condition of the Country during the Reign of James,   surnamed Buchanan
CHAPTER II
Resignation of James
CHAPTER III
Nomination of a New Chief Ruler
CHAPTER IV
Nomination of a New Chief Ruler, (continued)
CHAPTER V
About Abraham
CHAPTER VI
The Election of Chief Ruler

CHAPTER VII
Secession of South Carolina

CHAPTER VIII
War Declared

CHAPTER IX
The South Blockaded

CHAPTER X
Battle of Manassas

CHAPTER XI
Generals Pillow and Polk

CHAPTER XII
General Polk at Memphis

CHAPTER XIII
Hard Times in Dixie

CHAPTER XIV
Commissioners sent to Europe

CHAPTER XV
Andrew Johnson

CHAPTER XVI
Emerson Ethridge

CHAPTER XVII
Battle of Belmont

CHAPTER XVIII
Boss Hale

CHAPTER XIX
General M'clellan

CHAPTER XX
Fort Henry

CHAPTER XXI
Fort Donelson
CHAPTER XXII
Surrender of Nashville
CHAPTER XXIII
Battle of Shiloh
CHAPTER XXIV
Battle of Shiloh -- (Continued.)
CHAPTER XXV
Capture of New Orleans
CHAPTER XXVI
Evacuation of Columbus
CHAPTER XXVII
Fall of Fort Pillow and Capture of Memphis
CHAPTER XXVIII
Federal Dominion in Memphis
CHAPTER XXIX
George Drury and Ellen Grainger
CHAPTER XXX
George and Ellen -- (Continued.)
CHAPTER XXXI
Cotton Burning
CHAPTER XXXII
Federal Conquest of West Tennessee
CHAPTER XXXIII
Contrabands
CHAPTER XXXIV
Efforts to take Richmond
CHAPTER XXXV
Holly Springs
CHAPTER XXXVI
General Price
CHAPTER XXXVII
The Guerrillas
CHAPTER XXXVIII
Taking the Oath
CHAPTER XXXIX
Adventures of Two Young Secesh
CHAPTER XL
The Conscription
CHAPTER XLI
Vicksburg, Miss
CHAPTER XLII
Siege of Vicksburg
CHAPTER XLIII
Bragg invades Kentucky
CHAPTER XLIV
John H. Morgan
CHAPTER XLV
Escape of a Rebel Conscript
CHAPTER XLVI
Duvall goes to Dixie for his family
CHAPTER XLVII
Hon. H. Stephens
CHAPTER XLVIII
Brigadier Jeff
CHAPTER XLVIX
Peggy and Little Jimmy
CHAPTER L
Clinton, whose Surname was Chase
CHAPTER LI
Lake Providence
CHAPTER LII
Starting Intelligence
CHAPTER LIII
Sensation
CHAPTER LIV
The Escape
CHAPTER LV
Southern Intelligence
CHAPTER LVI
Lee's Marches into Maryland
CHAPTER LVII
Abraham's Warning
CHAPTER LVIII
Battle of Corinth
CHAPTER LVIX
Battle at Perryville
CHAPTER LX
Cane Hill and Perry Grove
CHAPTER LXI
Bombardment of Fredricksburg
CHAPTER LXII
Sherman's Attack on Vicksburg
CHAPTER LXIII
Stone River
CHAPTER LXIV
Parson Brownlow
CHAPTER LXV
Parson Brownlow (continued)
CHAPTERS LXVI
The Old Miller of Nashville
CHAPTER LXVII
The Edict of Emancipation
CHAPTER LXVIII
Greenbacks
CHAPTER LXVIX
Northern Prosperity
CHAPTER LXX
Negro Troops
CHAPTER LXXI
Running the Blockade
CHAPTER LXXII
Bread Riots
CHAPTER LXXIII
Vance's Appeal
CHAPTER LXXIV
Fort Sumter Bombarded
CHAPTER LXXV
Union Meetings
CHAPTER LXXVI
Chancellorville
CHAPTER LXXVII
Stoneman's Raid
CHAPTER LXXVIII
Vallandgham
CHAPTER LXXIX
More About Clement
CHAPTER LXXX
Port Gibson
CHAPTER LXXXI
John Bull and Louis Napoleon
CHAPTER LXXXII
Grierson's Splendid Ride
CHAPTER LXXXIII
Grand Charge on Vicksburg
CHAPTER LXXXIV
Arbitrary Arrests
CHAPTER LXXXV
Death of Jackson
CHAPTER LXXXVI
Lee Invades Pennsylvania
CHAPTER LXXXVII
The Call for Militia
CHAPTER LXXXVIII
The K. G. C.
CHAPTER LXXXIX
Good Works
CHAPTER XC
Speculation
CHAPTER XCI
Privateering
CHAPTER XCII
The Foreign Element
CHAPTER XCIII
The $300 Clause
CHAPTER XCIV
Black Troops
CHAPTER XCV
East and West
CHAPTER XCVI
Battle of Gettysburg - First Day
CHAPTER XCVII
Battle of Gettysburg - Second Day
CHAPTER XCVIII
Battle of Gettysburg - Third Day
CHAPTER XCIX
Bragg Retreats from Chattanooga
CHAPTER C
Vicksburg Falls
CHAPTER CI
Thanksgiving Psalms

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