August 1998 Weekly Firesides

Hear ye...............hear ye 

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group 
Week ending 09 August 1998

Thanks to all of the feedback to last week's "Fireside". I warms me to know that there are so many of you out there that "have heart!"...... The "Grass Roots" are alive and well!!!! Heh Heh

Well tonight I'm trying another bit American Lore on my music machine >>>>> Thought maybe you might be interested.... I've long been fascinated by our Spiritual Heritage and therefore am on the lookout for CD's that have that "true heritage" recorded. While doing the "Fireside" tonight I'm listening to a collection of "Shaker Chants and Spirtuals" collected and produced by Joel Cohen. The music is really unique. Cohen, the director of "The Boston Camerata" teamed up with "The Schola Cantorum of Boston", director Frederick Jodry, went to the Shaker Community of Sabbathday Lake, Maine and thus this CD. One that might be familiar to you is "Simple Gifts". Aaron Copeland did an awesome arrangement of this piece in "Appalachian Spring". Cohen has produced another CD with "The Boston Camerata" called "Trav'ling Home - American Spirituals (1770-1870). If you enjoy the authentic sounds of our heritage, then you'll surely enjoy these.

Thursday was indeed and wonderful evening. The Story "The End and The Beginning" was enjoyed by all. For that I'm really glad as it was an attempt to "tell more of a story" than to do a lecture. We had a great time and enjoyed the company of quite a few 1st timers.....

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU :-)..... COME AGAIN, WE RELISH YOUR COMPANY.... 

The continuing series in the newsletter, is on the Civil War Military Records which can be found at, 
or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers........ So many of you have been astonished 
that those records are available through the FHCs, that we thought this would be of worth in your 
research.... 

This upcoming Thursday is "Letters, Songs and Poems" Night. If you've not yet experienced on of these monthly special evenings, you have really missed something unique... About two years ago, some of the members asked to read some of their Civil War Letters of ancestors. Needless to say we jumped at the chance to do that. It was such a HIT that we have made that a monthly occurrance ever since and it has become one of our monthly highlights. We have received hundreds of letters and poems from our members and they just keep coming. :-) So come and join us for a neat experience.....
************************************************************************************* 

THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". 
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. Meeting Logs are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters". 
************************************************************************************* 
U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers............................. 

The next stage of series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records 
available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

Specific Union Sources........................... 

Union Army soldiers may have served in the U.S. Army, local militia units mustered into federal service, 
or volunteer regiments raised by the individual states. The length of service varied from 90 days to three 
years. Many soldiers also re-enlisted serving in more than one regiment. The Union Army and Navy 
enlisted over 2.3 million men, of which nearly 359,000 died in combat or from wounds and disease.

Union Service Records

Service Records of Soldiers. - There is currently no master index to the names of soldiers who served in 
Union volunteer regiments. Note from the editor: A Union Soldiers Roster is in the making by Broadfoot 
Publishing, but it's incomplete. Individual indexes to state volunteer regiments are available on microfilm 
for every Northern state and every Southern state except South Carolina. Most service records have not 
been microfilmed and are available only at the National Archives. The following service records and 
indexes are available on microfilm at the National Archives and Family History Library........

...........states continued.

- Nebraska. Index. National Archives Microfilm Publication M547 (FHL 
films 821,905-06; FHLC computer number 279839).

- Nevada. Index. National Archives Microfilm Publication M548 (FHL 
films 821,939).


- New Hampshire. Index, National Archives Microfilm Publication M549 (FHL films 882,018-30 and 882,902; FHLC computer number 100690).

- New Jersey. Index, National Archives Microfilm Publication M550 (FHL films 882,031-56; FHLC computer number 280728).

- New Mexico. Compiled Service Records, National Archives Microfilm Publication M427 (FHL films 
471,538-83; FHLC computer number 420836) and Index, National Archives Microfilm Publication 
M242 (FHL films 821,883-86; FHLC computer number 475736).

- New York. Index, National Archives Microfilm Publication M551 (FHL films 882,057-213; FHLC computer number 377673).

- North Carolina. Compiled Service Records, National Archives Microfilm Publication M401 (FHL films 
1,473,248-72; FHLC computer number 437573) and Index, National Archives Microfilm Publication M391 (FHL films 881,590-91; FHLC computer number 278987).

-Ohio. Index, National Archives Microfilm Publication M552 (FHL films 882,214-335; FHLC computer number 288133).

.........................to be continued... 
************************************************************************************ 
Subj: New URL for Confederate
From: rosewebb@datasync.com (Rose C. Webb)

Subject: 
[NEW-GEN-URL-L] Great URL for Confederate ancestors, regimental info and more

If you are interested in info on Confederate regiments, Confederate
troops and more, check out
http://www.tarleton.edu/activities/pages/facultypages/jones/
Lee Griggs
-- 
Saints & Sinners Newsletter 
PO Box 1536
Camden, SC 29020-8536
Tel: 803-432-9008 Fax: 803-424-0450

{{{Rosie}}} As ever - our "Web-Gatherer"
************************************************************************************
************************************************************************************

DID YOU KNOW?? ................................... 
Excerpts taken from "Best Little Stories from the Civil War" by C. Brian Kelly.....

In 1861 ----- The trouble with Fort Sumter was that it really was an island situated in hostile waters. As the year began, it was, by order of South Carolina's authorities, cut off from the mainland -- no communication, no supplies for Major Anderson and his garrison of eighty souls. 
In Washington, the policymakers of the Federal capital awaited a change in presidents at the very6 moment of the young Republic's worst crisis ever. Winfield Scott, general in chief of the U.S. Army, had obtained permission to send Major Anderson help in the form of supplies, ammunition, and additional troops.
The supplies and 250 reinforcements set sail in an ordinary, civilian merchant ship called "Star of The West." But at Fort Sumter, Anderson was expecting his resupply and reinforcements to be accomplished by U.S. Navy warships.
The "Star of The West" arrived off the harbor entrance at 1:30 in the morning on January 9, then hove to in the main shipping channel to wait for daylight before proceeding farther.
As daylight began to reveal her outlines, she was moving again. Artillery hidden in nearby sandhills opened fire. The first shot was traditional -- across the bow. When the "Star of The West" kept moving, the cannon fire continued. Two rounds struck the merchange ship, which ran a flag up and down a forward mast as if a plea for Anderson to tell her what to do. Now Fort Moultrie lay in the ship's path, manned by hot-eyed South Carolina sucessionists. And Moultrie's guns, while not yet in range, opened fire.
At Fort Sumter, all was confusion and disarray at the ship's unexpected appearance. Army surgeon Samuel Crawford, one of Major Anderson's seven officers at the island outpost, later wrote that Anderson didn't know what to do, since he had anticipated a war-ship rather than a merchant vessel. And further, snarled halyards prevented his men from replying quickly to the Star's signals.
The "Star of The West" was not about to present her vulnerable broadside for a raking by the batteries at Fort Moultrie, and so the rescue ship turned and pointed toward the open sea. Major Anderson was about to order Fort Sumter's own guns into action.. against Fort Moultrie. But, he saw the ship turn away. "Hold on," he told his men. "Do not fire."
It was all over in just a few minutes. "The flag of the country had been fired on under our very guns, and no helping hand had been extended," wrote Dr. Crawford, who soon would give up his medical bag to become an active combat commander -- and eventually a major general -- in the Union Army.
After a flutter of messages between Major Anderson at Fort Sumter and various authorities representing the newly formed Confederate States of America., there came a final, most formal, notice to the U.S. Army officer at 3:30 am on April 12.

"Sir: By authority of Brigadier General Beauregard, commanding the provisional forces of the 
Confederate States, we have the honor to notify you that we will open of his batteries at Fort 
Sumter in one hour from this time..........................

************************************************************************************ 
A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................ 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of 
Interest and Pleas for HELP................ 

************************************************************************************
Subj: Fwd: Teaching Math
Date: 98-07-23 20:13:14 EDT
From: Bulldogtjr
To: FI WATROUS, GFS Jim, Cato3240, DJoi, NEVassau
To: MDelPa, Sawdust@cybernet1.com


-----------------
Subj: Teaching Math
From: Bulldogjtr

> Teaching Math
>
> Teaching Math in 1950:
> A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is
> 4/5 of the price. What is his profit?
>
> Teaching Math in 1960:
> A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. His cost of production is
> 4/5 of the price, or $80. What is his profit?
>
> Teaching Math in 1970:
> A logger exchanges a set "L" of lumber for a set "M" of money. The
> cardinality of set "M" is 100. Each element is worth one dollar.
> Make 100 dots representing the elements of the set "M". The set "C", the
> cost of production contains 20 fewer points than set "M." Represent the
> set "C" as a subset of set "M" and answer the following question: What
> is the cardinality of the set "P" for profits?
>
> Teaching Math in 1980:
> A logger sells a truckload of lumber for $100. Her cost of production is
> $80 and her profit is $20. Your assignment: Underline the number 20.
>
> Teaching Math in 1990:
> By cutting down beautiful forest trees, the logger makes $20. What do you
> think of this way of making a living?
> Topic for class participation after answering the question: How did the
> forest birds and squirrels feel as the logger cut down the trees?
> There are no wrong answers.
>
> Teaching Math in 1996:
> By laying off 40% of its loggers, a company improves its stock price from
> $80 to $100. How much capital gain per share does the CEO make
> by exercising his stock options at $80? Assume capital gains are no
> longer taxed, because this encourages investment.
>
> Teaching Math in 1997:
> A company outsources all of its loggers. The firm saves on benefits, and
> when demand for its product is down, the logging work force can easily be
> cut back. The average logger employed by the company earned $50,000, had
> three weeks vacation, a nice retirement plan and medical insurance. The
> contracted logger charges $50 an hour. Was
> outsourcing a good move?
>
> Teaching Math in 1998:
> A laid-off logger with four kids at home and a ridiculous alimony from his
> first failed marriage comes into the logging-company corporate offices
> and goes postal, mowing down 16 executives and a couple of secretaries,
> and gets lucky when he nails a politician on the premises collecting his
> kickback. Was outsourcing the loggers a good move for the company?
>
> Teaching Math in 1999:
> A laid-off logger serving time in Folsom for blowing away several people
> is being trained as a COBOL programmer in order to work on Y2K projects.
> What is the probability that the automatic cell doors will open on their
> own as of 00:01, 01/01/2000?

"Ted" Heh Heh - This is NOT a joke...... Closer than you think.
*************************************************************************************
Subj: How to Figure Birthdates
From: FI WATROUS

Hope this helps you in your research. I could have used this information years ago!
Ike & Nancy Watrous
FIWATROUS@aol.com
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
How to Figure Birthdates
>From "Compendium of Historical Sources"
by Ronald Bremer

Often tombstones have a notation such as: "Died 15 June 1872, Aged 77
years, 10 months, 3 days." How do you determine the correct birthdate?

First of all, make the sequence read days, months, years: thus 15-6-1872 minus
3-10-77.

Since the 10th month cannot be subtracted from the sixth, borrow 12 months
from the year of death, making the year 1871 and the month 18. (If you borrow
from
the month to make days, borrow 30 days, even though the month might have 31.) 

The equation now looks like: 15-18-1871 minus 3-10-77. Begin the calculations
on the right hand side. Therefore, 77 years from 1871 means that the person
was born in 1794. Subtracting 10 months from 18 gives you eight months, or
August.

So the correct date of birth was 12 August 1794.

{{Ike and Nancy}} Good stuff.... :-)
*************************************************************************************
Subj: Re: A Weekly Fireside - Special Edition - 1
Date: 98-07-27 17:34:29 EDT
From: Garyamx
To: GFS Jim

Jim, recently I discovered one of my ancestors was from Rensselaer, New York. So, your message is of grave concern to me. Thank you. Regards, Gary

{{Gary}} - check the latest "Special Edition of the Fireside". Ted has a bit more follow-up information....
*************************************************************************************
From: FBenway

Hello Jim:
That was a great newsletter, I must say Yours are the best that I get, filled with
Loads of information, with some good humor thrown in. Keep them coming and continued
Good luck with this indexer.
I am going to forward a poem that I wrote OK.

Best Wishes,
Ben

A SOLDIER

He laid there in a mud soaked ditch with fear and despair
The shells flew oer him with shrapnel everywhere

First a scream and then a moan as shrapnel
Tore through body and ripped out the soul

Then did the barrage slowly lift and the eerie silence sifted
But screams and moans they slowly drifted

But Bugle calls there startled sound did break the deadly silence
They told us all to stand and fight

For oer the Blood soaked field they came
There Banners high and brave

A line of grey there heads held high advanced across the gore

With trembling hands his musket rose
He aimed it at his foe and fired at the foe

Who was right, who was wrong never came to mind
Only he must fight or most 'suredly would die

The grey line staggered then it broke and 
Slowly it withdrew back over that field of red

For now he heared the loud command
Fix steel and attack

The bugle sounded out the charge and o'er the baricades they went
With muskets up they started across that that field of blood and gore

With eagles flying overhead they met us on that field
We cut and slashed and stabbed and stabbed would ere it ever end

When suddenly the earth came up and struck a mighty blow
A soft gray haze it covered him like a Quilt of down

Now when his consciousness did come for then he felt the pain
Then looked down at his shattered leg
The bone was broken and exposed against against his mangled flesh

He knew that he must move or die so slowly he did rise
His musket was but a crutch as he hobbled toward his lines

Then hands reached out and cradled him as blackness did enfold
Now when he woke an angel there was wiping of his brow
He layed there in frozen shock for heaven it must be

But consciously he did rise up 
T'was then he saw the empty space where his leg should be

T'was then he woke in a sea of sweat, the dream had shook him so
For he had been a Rebel in the same dream not so long age

"Ben" OK!! Good poem!!..... :-) I added this to the "Fireside" because this poem is by "Ben's own hand", and I thought it worthy of his efforts to show our thanks by sharing it with all of you.....
*************************************************************************************
Subj: Letter from Mo. Review
From: Holm Hogs

"GRASSHOPPERED"
Jefferson City Daily Tribune, June 2, 1875
Harrisonville, Mo., May 29, 1875

Editor Tribune: I send you by mail slight tokens left in my garden by the
army of the West, now encamped on our people and foraging upon them;
the havoc made by these raiders is ten thousand times worse than Jennison's,
Quantrell's, Bill Anderson's, Price's and all the raids combined, that ever
swept over Cass County--during the war--worse and more destructive than
Sherman's march to the sea, or Sheridan's raids in the Shenandoah Valley.

There is a great deal of destitution in our county, and the prospect for
a better future is very gloomy. Those of us who live in the towns lose our
little garden patches, which we murmur and complain about, of small impor-
tance compared to the destruction of broad acres of the substantial wealth
of a community. When our gardens are as bare as the trodden streets, and
our broad fields are teeming with grain--we never think of it. Yet when both
garden and fields are as bare as the beaten highways, especially the first of
June, we have cause to murmur.

These cuttings that I send you are from my currant bushes and pear trees,
giving slight evidence of the destructiveness of the inevitable grasshopper.

For four long years in Cass, we have been looking for a better day, year
after year we hoped would be the prosperous season. Chinch bugs prey upon
us; the drought, like a dreadful sirocco, sweeps over the land and burns our
subsistence; then the grasshoppers rise up out of the ground and finish the
dreadful work.

Hope is perishing in us; our people are in debt, and the very necessaries
of life the thing sufficient to keep body and soul together, are scarcely ob-
tainable by hundreds. We are living on bread and meat--no vegetables. And,
let me say to you, up to this date, I have not had upon my table, a lettuce; an
onion; a radish (sic), or any other green thing grown this season. I have heard
of a few families who have ordered vegetables from St. Louis.

Excuse this long letter--I am not begging--knowing that some of our
people have been in your county, I thought I would give you facts in regard
to our condition.

Say to all of my old friends--best wishes--and that if grasshoppers ever 
make a raid on Jefferson City, the Missouri militia will be forgotten forever.
As ever,
D.D.

{{Deanne}} I was saving this :-) IKE!! This sounds like the phenominal Cicada hatch this year in Columbia, Missouri. If I remember correctly y'all had 4 hatches in the same year which is incredibly rare.... and hard on leaves, ANY leaves.......
*************************************************************************************
From: NJBelle1

Jim, thank you for continuing to send the Fireside chat to me. I have been away on vacation and I am not able to log on as often as I would like. The websites are a wonderful addition to my research. I have so much to share with those interested in "hardcore" research. Allow me to close with just one anecdote. About 25 years ago, my older brother was shown a pair of grave markers on the side of a barely used country road in Attala County, MS, called Cole Road. This road is now being used by loggers, which has made it fairly easy to walk on. If it rains, as it did on Friday evening, there are impassable spots. My brother and I walked this road for about a mile to relocate these markers. They were still there. The graves belong to Valentine and Mary Mabry. Valentine Austin Mabry fought in the Civil War and is my great-great-uncle. The area around the markers is totally unkempt and weed infested. His final resting place is remote from the main Mabry cemetery probably because they buried him on the grounds of his former home. No one really knows for sure. He was not know to be a black sheep or anything like that. He served with the 11th MS (Perrin's Cavalry) Co. C. I was very excited to have seen his final resting place. He made it through the war and died in Attala County, MS, October 10, 1885. He had been married twice. This is all I really know about him. My brother told me that he would go back there and clear away all the weeds and debris from around the markers.
Just thought I would share. Thank you again, Rose

{{Rose}} This indeed be a story worth telling.......... Thanks for sharing.. :-) It reminds me of my wife and I finding her old family farm (1850s ) back in Missouri. It took us about three hours of hiking around in Phelps County, MO. We came to the top of this hill that was completely overgrown with brush and trees. We had been following this old wagon track that was only visible about half the time. When we starting clearing away some of the "dead fall", we found the old foundation from the main house, then the spring house, and the barn. Off to one side of the hill under these 100 year old Oak Trees was the family cemetery plot. We had to trace the tombstones and even then they were very hard to read. What a feeling up there as the sun was going down and the mist started rising off the river in the distance. Ummmm Ummmmm
*************************************************************************************

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT…………. 

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of. 

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate 
one Thursday a month to the sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; 
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, 
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum.

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on 
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly 
Fireside." 

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from 
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste-
haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events****** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Host GFS Jim and our many 
fill-in friends :) 


8/13/98 - "Letters, Songs and Poems" Night. 

8/20/98 - OPEN CHAT

8/27/98 - OPEN CHAT (GFS Jim's on the road again)

9/3/98 - OPEN CHAT (GFS Jim's STILL on the road)

We'll See You Thursday Night……….! 
Your Hosts 
GFS Jayne and GFS Jim 

Hear ye...........Hear ye

"The Weekly Fireside" 
of the American Civil War History 
Special Interest Group 
Week ending 16 August 1998 

Well, needless to say, we have had another GREAT Civil War Letters, Songs and Poems Evening. We 
just had some incredible material provided by our membership. There's just nothing better for the study 
and understanding of this period, than to read the material left by those it "touched". We also had an 
interesting visitor. He was a 16 year old named Chris who just knocked our socks off with his knowledge. 
We enjoyed your visit Chris, come back and visit.... Heh Heh 

I don't quite know what's come over me the last number of weeks. Between the books, "mind stunning" 
movies and some great music, I've just gone "Mental"... LOL I'm listening to Celtic tonight, one of my 
favorite categories. And I gotta tell you about a family that's really gotten under my skin. This family has 
three (3) CD producing members of Celtic music. The one I'm sure you've heard is Enya who is just 
great. Another, you might not know about is Maire Brennan who is Enya's sister and has a great lovin' 
style of her own. And finally the Celtic group "Clannad" which stands for "Family". This is the group 
that Maire currently sings with and the one that Enya sang with before she started going solo. 

I also, just finished watching the movie Amistad. Man! That was awesome. John Quincy Adams was 
quite figure in that trial for a "pathetic ex President". There were a couple of phrases that just shook my 
socks. One was made by Cinque the Mendan that made the statement that "we are the product of all our 
descendents." Ponder on that one awhile. And the other was made by John Quincy Adams at the 
Supreme Court trial when he said that "if the Civil War was to be the last battle of the Revolution, then so 
be it." Lord have mercy, that's enough to send you to the loft for a wee bit......... 

Well enough of going Mental. LOL We still had a great time and enjoyed the company of quite a few 1st 
timers..... 

FOR ALL YOU 1ST TIMERS THURSDAY - "WELCOME" WE ENJOYED HAVING YOU :-)..... 
COME AGAIN, WE RELISH YOUR COMPANY.... 

The continuing series in the newsletter, is on the Civil War Military Records which can be found at, 
or through film ordering at your local Family History Centers........ So many of you have been astonished 
that those records are available through the FHCs, that we thought this would be of worth in your 
research.... 

This upcoming Thursday is OPEN CHAT. So come and join us for a neat experience..... You know one 
of our members has recently sent us a great collection of letters and poems, so we've decided to share his 
collection with you in a special evening. They have been provided by Frank Crawford (IllinoisCW) and 
therefore September 10 will be a Letters, Poems and Songs night featuring Frank's collection. Mark your 
calendars. A NOTE to you all. I’ll be traveling over the next two weeks down to Pensacola again, so the 
next FIRESIDE won’t be until I return home which will be 4 September..... Soooo don’t be alarmed “it 
ain’t gone away” Heh Heh

Now’s a good time to also THANK ALL OF YOU for your faithful inputs. Every week I send out the 
maximum size newsletter AOL will allow me to send through the system. That means I have about 2 
weeks worth of feedback queue’d up for the next one. What a group you are :D I could send these out as attachments and get more in them, but so many of you are “leary” of downloading ANY attachment that this is really the best course, embedding them in the mail itself....
************************************************************************************* 

THE HELP DESK 

This segment is to address specific questions that hit our plate on Thursday night that we didn't have a 
chance to answer or needed a bit of time to check it out. Hope these answer the mail :D 

Editor's Note: Regimental Histories and Letters, etc. Postings: keyword "roots", after which will bring 
you to the main screen of the Genealogy Forum. Select the "Files Library Center", then "History Files". 
At that point select "Civil War Files. Lectures are also posted in the "Files Library Center" under "History 
Lectures" as the Lecture Subject. Meeting Logs are posted in the "Files Library Center" under "Meeting 
Logs and Newsletters". 
************************************************************************************* 
U.S. Military Records at the Family History Centers............................. 

The next stage of series, I thought would be best to describe the various Types of Military Records 
available for Civil War researchers and those available through the FHC network. 

Specific Union Sources........................... 

Union Army soldiers may have served in the U.S. Army, local militia units mustered into federal service, 
or volunteer regiments raised by the individual states. The length of service varied from 90 days to three 
years. Many soldiers also re-enlisted serving in more than one regiment. The Union Army and Navy 
enlisted over 2.3 million men, of which nearly 359,000 died in combat or from wounds and disease. 

Union Service Records 

Service Records of Soldiers. - There is currently no master index to the names of soldiers who served in 
Union volunteer regiments. Note from the editor: A Union Soldiers Roster is in the making by Broadfoot 
Publishing, but it's incomplete. Individual indexes to state volunteer regiments are available on microfilm 
for every Northern state and every Southern state except South Carolina. Most service records have not 
been microfilmed and are available only at the National Archives. The following service records and 
indexes are available on microfilm at the National Archives and Family History Library........ 

...........states continued. 

-Oregon. Index. National Archives Microfilm Publication M553 (FHL 
film 821,947). 

-Pennsylvania. Index. National Archives Microfilm Publication M554(FHL 
films 882,336-472; FHLC computer number 324020). 

- Rhode Island. Index, National Archives Microfilm Publication M555 (FHL films 881,940-46; FHLC 
computer number 90189). 

- Tennessee. Compiled Service Records, National Archives Microfilm Publication M395 (FHL films 
1,482,042-261; FHLC computer number 437576) and Index, National Archives Microfilm Publication 
M392 (FHL films 821,889-904; FHLC computer number 279747). 

- Texas. Compiled Service Records, National Archives Microfilm Publication M402 (FHL films 
1,292,646-58; FHLC computer number 110840) and Index, National Archives Microfilm Publication 
M393 (FHL films 881,592-93; FHLC computer number 278973). 

- Utah. Compiled Service Records, National Archives Microfilm Publication M692 (FHL films 
831,588) and Index, National Archives Microfilm Publication M556 (FHL film 1,292,645). 

- Vermont. Index, National Archives Microfilm Publication M557 (FHL films 882,472-85; FHLC 
computer number 278651). 

.........................to be continued... 

************************************************************************************ 

DID YOU KNOW?? ................................... 
Excerpts taken from "Best Little Stories from the Civil War" by C. Brian Kelly..... 

What was it like, that first time under fire? In real battle during the U.S. Civil War? Brothers of 
the native soil against brothers of the same good earth? 
...an officer from Maine sometime after: "The behavior of those who were hit appeared to be 
singular; and, as there were so many of them, it looked as if we had a crowd of howling dervishes dancing 
and kicking around in our ranks." 
...a Confederate cavalry colonel: "Barely in position, I heard a distant cannon, and at the same 
instant saw the ball high in the air. As near as I could calculate, it was going to strike about where I 
stood, and I dismounted with remarkable agility, only to see the missile of war pass 60 feet overhead." 
...an unnamed soldier added: "For the first time in your life you listen to the whizzing of iron. 
Grape and canister fly into the ranks, bomb-shells burst overhead, and the fragments fly all around you." 
...the same Maine officer again: "A bullet often knocks over the man it hits, and rarely fails by 
its force alone to disturb his equilibrium. Then the shock, whether painful or not, causes a sudden jump 
or shudder." 
...a Rebel colonel: "I felt rather foolish as I looked at my men, but a good deal relieved when I 
saw that they too, had all squatted to the ground, and were none of them looking up at me. I quickly 
mounted and ordered them to 'standup.'" 
...unnamed soldier: "A friend falls; perhaps a dozen or 20 of your comrades lie wounded or 
dying at your feet; a strange, involuntary shrinking steals over you, which it is impossible to resist. 
...Maine officer: "Now, as every man, and hardly an exception, was either killed, wounded, hit in 
the clothes, hit by spent balls or or stones, or jostled by his wounded comrades, it follows that we had a 
wonderful exhibition. Some reeled round and round, others threw up their arms and fell over backwards, 
others when plunging backwards, others went plunging backward trying to regain their balance; a few fell 
to the front, but generally the force of the bullet prevented this, except where it struck low and apparently 
knocked the soldier's feet from under him. Many dropped the musket and seized the wounded part with 
both hands, and a very few fell dead." 
...Rebel colonel: "We were soon ordered to charge, and drove the enemy through the tall prairie 
grass, till they came to a creek and escaped. We passed some of the dead and wounded, the first sad 
results of real war that I had ever seen." 
...unnamed soldier: "You feel inclined neither to advance nor recede, but are spell-bound by the 
contending emotions of the moral and physical man. The cheek blanches, the lip quivers, and the eye 
almost hesitates to look upon the scene." 
...Maine officer: "The enemy were armed with every kind of rifle and musket, and as their front 
was three times ours, we were under a crossfire almost from the first. The various tunes sung by the 
bullets we shall never forget... The fierce zip of the Minie bullets was not prominent by comparison at 
that particular moment, though there were enough of them certainly. The main body of sound was 
produced by the singing of slow, round balls and buckshot fired from a smooth-bore, which do not cut or 
tear the air as the creased ball does. Each bullet, according to its kind, size, rate of speed, and nearness to 
the ear, made a different sound. They seemed to be going past in sheets, all around, and above us." 
...Rebel colonel: "At night the heavens opened wide, the rain fell in torrents; not even a campfire 
could be kept to light up the impenetrable gloom, and I sought a comfortable mud-hole to sleep as best I 
could. The pale rigid faces that I had seen turned up for the evening sun appeared before me as I tried in 
vain to shield my own from the driving rain, and as the big foot of a comrade, blundering round in the 
darkness, splashed my eyes full of mud, I cloed them to sleep, muttering to myself, 'And this is war.' " 
...unnamed soldier: "In this attitude you may, perhaps, be ordered to stand an hour, inactive, 
havoc meanwhile marking its footsteps with blood on every side. Finally the order is given to advance, to 
fire, or to charge. And now, what a change! With your first shot you become a new man. Personal safety 
is your least concern. Fear has no existence in your bosom. Hesitation gives way to an uncontrollable 
desire to rush into the thickest part of the fight. The dead and dying around you, if they receive a passing 
thought, only serve to stimulate you to revenge." 
...further: "You become cool and deliberate, and watch the effect of the bullets, the shower of 
bursting shells, the passage of cannonballs as they rake their murderous channels through your ranks, the 
plunging of wounded horses, the agonies of the dying, and the clash of contending arms, which follows 
the charge, with a feeling so calloused by surrounding circumstances that your soul seems deat to every 
sympathising and selfish thought. 

So, it was for the newcomer to battle, it seems. But when it's all over, what then? 
"Walking the battleground, among the dead and groaning wounded," said the unknown soldier, 
"you begin to realize the horrors of war, and experience a reaction of nature." Wondrously," the heart 
opens its floodgates, humanity reasserts herself again, and you begin to feel." 
You now help the wounded, friend or foe. Foe, too? Yes. "The enemy, whom, but a short time 
before, full of hate, you were doing all in your power to kill, you now endeavor to save." 
You provide water, food, whatever he needs. "All that is human and charitable in your nature 
now rises to the surface." Amazing. And, oh, so true: "A battlefield is eminently a place that tries men's 
souls." 

************************************************************************************ 

A BIT OF COMMUNITY............................ 

Check out the following member inputs for comments and requests for information, Feedbacks, Items of 
Interest and Pleas for HELP................ 

************************************************************************************ 
From: FI WATROUS 

Jim, 
I think you have all the material you can handle for this coming Poems, Songs and Letters evening -- save this for another time. 
Ike 
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ 
ROLL-CALL 
by Nathaniel Graham Shepherd 

The spirit of Shepherd's somber poem, "Roll Call" lives in images of the burial parties of countless 
brigades, but is especially reflected in the Old Vermont Brigade. Many occasions arose in the Old 
Vermont Brigade for forming burial parties; for these soldiers belonged to the brigade that suffered the 
greatest loss of life of any one brigade during th war. 1,172 of its men were either killed in battle or died 
of wounds. The same five regiments that lay in Camp Griffin, near Washington, D.C., in 1861 
marched together in the Grand Review on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington in 1865. When their term 
of enlistment expired in 1864, they had all re-enlisted and preserved the existence of the brigade. It 
was famous also for being composed entirely of troops from one State. It contained the Second, Third, 
Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Vermont Infantry, and later the First Vermont Heavy Artillery. It was in this 
respect conspicuous in the Union Army, which did not adopt the Confederate policy of grouping 
regiments from the same State in brigades. The gallant record of the Vermont Brigade was nowhere more 
conspicuous than in the Wilderness Campaign. The first five regiments lost in the battle of the 
Wilderness, May 5-6, 1864: 195 killed, 1,017 wounded, and 57 missing, making a total of 1, 269. Within 
a week its loss had amounted to 58 percent of the number engaged. The words of the poet are therefore no merely fanciful pciture of frightful loss in battle. There were a dozen battles in which the federal armies alone lost more than 10,000 men, enough to populate a city, and it has been estimated that the totals on both sides amounted to more than 700,000 killed and wounded. When it is recalled that most of these were young men who in the natural course of events had many years of usefulness yet to live for their country, the cost to the American nation is simply appalling. This is entirely aside from the many 
sorrowing mourners for the heroes of the Old Vermont Brigade and for many others who failed on the battlefield to answer "here" at roll-call. 

"Corporal Green!" the Orderly cried; 
"Here!" was the answer loud and clean, 
From the lips of a soldier who stood near, - 
And "Here" was the word the next replied. 

"Cyrus Drew!" - then a silence fell; 
This time no answer followed the call; 
Only his rear-man had seen him fall: 
Killed or wounded - he could not tell. 

There they stood in the failing light, 
These men of battle, with grave, dark looks, 
As plain to be read as open books, 
While slowly gathered the shades of night. 

The fern on the hilsides was spashed with blood 
And down in the corn where the poppies grew 
Were redder stains than the poppies knew, 
And crimson-dyed was the river's flood. 

For the foe had crossed from the other side, 
That day in the face of murderous fire 
That swept them down in its terrible ire; 
And their life-blood went to color the tide. 

"Herbert Cline!" - At the call there came 
Two stalwart soldiers into the line 
Bearing between them this Herbert Cline, 
Wounded and bleeding to answer his name. 

"Ezra Kerr!" - and a voice answered "Here!" 
"Hiram Kerr!" - but no man replied. 
They were brothers, these two; the sad wind sighed, 
And a shudder crept through the cornfield near. 

"Ephraim Deane!" - then a soldier spoke: 
"Deane carried our regiments colors," he said, 
"When our ensign was shot: I left him dead 
Just after the enemy wavered and broke. 

"Close to the roadside his body lies; 
I paused a moment and gave him to drink; 
He murmured his mother's name, I think, 
And Death came with it and closed his eyes. 

'Twas a victory, yes; but it cost us dear: 
For that company's roll, when called at night 
Of a hundred men who went into the fight 
Numbered but twenty that answered "Here!" 

Published in PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY OF THE CIVIL WAR, 
Vol 9, pub 1911 

{{{Ike and Nancy}}} Per many requests, this is included in the "Fireside" this week. No more words are 
needed; many thanks. 
************************************************************************************* 
Subj: The Flood 
From: Pollyann9 

The Lord said to Noah, "In six months, I'm going to make it rain until the earth is covered with water and 
all the evil is destroyed. I want you to build an ark and save two of each animal species. Here are the 
blueprints for the ark." 

Six months passed. The skies began to cloud and rain began to fall. 

Noah sat in his front yard, weeping. 

"Why haven't you built the ark?" asked the Lord. 

"Oh, forgive me," said Noah. "I did my best, but so many things happened. 

"The blueprints you gave me didn't meet the city's code and I had to change them. Then the city said I 
was violating the zoning ordinance by building an ark in my front yard, so I had to get a varience.. 

"The Forest Service required tree-cutting permits, and I was sued by a state animal rights group when I 
tried to gather up the animals. 

"The EPA required an environmental impact statement concerning the flood. the Army Corps of 
Engineers wanted a map of the proposed flood plain. 

"The IRS seized all my assets, claiming I was trying to avoid paying taxes by leaving the country, and the 
Equal Opportunity Commission said I wasn't hiring enough Croatians. 

"I'm sorry, Lord, but I can't finish the ark for at least five years." 

Suddenly the rain stopped, the skies cleared and the sun began to shine. 

Noah looked up and said, "Lord, does this mean you're not going to devastate the earth?" 

"Right," said the Lord. "The government already has." 

{{{Pollyana}}} I would laugh, but after this week's events, I can't....... :-( Perfect timing...... 
************************************************************************************* 
From: Okie4715 

Dear Jim and Jayne, 
Thank you so very much for putting me on your mailing list for The Weekly Fireside. I loved it. I have 
many ancestors who fought in the Civil War, and I am always trying to find out some info on them . I 
loved the articles and will look forward to receiving the newsletter each week. Hope to chat with you soon 
Thanks again. 
Okie4725 (Doris) Tulsa, OK. 

{{{Doris}}} We're glad we are meeting a need :D; and we'll be looking for you. 
************************************************************************************* 
Subj: Nevada Civil War Volunteers 
From: MDelPa 

{{{{Jimmy}}}} 
This came in today's (07 August 1998) Ancestry Daily News... Didn't know whether you or somebody 
else might be interested. 
Jayne 

DATABASE OF THE DAY (Free for 10 Days!) 07 August 1998 
======================================================= 
Nevada Civil War Volunteers 

With the onset of the American Civil War in 1861, the Territory of 
Nevada set a process in motion to create the 1st Nevada Volunteer 
Cavalry. This database consists of muster roll indexes for this unit 
from its creation in 1863 through 1866. Information provided includes 
the recruit's name; place of birth (indicated by "Nativity"); muster 
location and date; date, location, and reason for leaving the unit; and 
company and rank. Persons volunteering for this unit came from as many 
as 28 different states and 18 foreign countries, including the 
territories of Utah and Nevada and the State of California. 

Bibliography: Robinson, Doreen. "Muster Roll Indexes for the 1st Nevada 
Volunteer Cavalry, 1863." Orem, UT: Ancestry, 1998. 

To search this database, go to: 
http://www.ancestry.com/ancestry/search/3349.htm 

{{{Jayne}}} Good info....... thanks Pard..... 
************************************************************************************* 
Subj: THANKS and Epidemics :-)) 
Date: 98-08-07 12:52:52 EDT 
From: GFS Jayne 
To: GFS Jim 

{{{{{{{Jimmy}}}}}}}} 
thanks for the log!!!!!! :-) 
Jim... TUBES14 came in the room after you left.... He's a guide at Gettysburg. Didn't he used to come in 
the room?? I didn't see his name on our distribution list however.... just wondered..... maybe he should 
be added (or maybe he had asked to be taken off??) 

Received this from a cousin, just thought you might be interested. :-) 

In case you ever wondered why a large number of your ancestors 
disappeared during a certain period in history, this might help. 

Epidemics have always had a great influence on people - and thus 
influencing, as well, the genealogists trying to trace them. Many 
cases of people disappearing from records can be traced to dying 
during an epidemic or moving away from the affected area. Some 
of the major epidemics in the United States are listed below: 

1657 Boston Measles 
1687 Boston Measles 
1690 New York Yellow Fever 
1713 Boston Measles 
1729 Boston Measles 
1732-3 Worldwide Influenza 
1738 South Carolina Smallpox 
1739-40 Boston Measles 
1747 CT,NY,PA,SC Measles 
1759 N. Amer [areas inhabited by white people] Measles 
1761 N. Amer and West Indies Influenza 
1772 N. America Measles 
1775 N. Amer [especially hard in NE] epidemic Unknown 
1775-6 Worldwide [one of the worst epidemics] Influenza 
1783 Dover, DE ["extremely fatal"] Bilious Disorder 
1788 Philadelphia and New York Measles 
1793 Vermont [a "putrid" fever] and Influenza 
1793 VA [killed 500 in 5 counties in 4 weeks] Influenza 
1793 Philadelphia [one of the worst epidemics] Yellow Fever 
1793 Harrisburg, PA [many unexplained deaths] Unknown 
1793 Middletown, PA [many mysterious deaths] Unknown 
1794 Philadelphia, PA Yellow Fever 
1796-7 Philadelphia, PA Yellow Fever 
1798 Philadelphia, PA [one of the worst] Yellow Fever 
1803 New York Yellow Fever 
1820-3 Nationwide [starts-Schuylkill River and spreads] "Fever" 
1831-2 Nationwide [brought by English emigrants] Asiatic Cholera 
1832 NY City and other major cities Cholera 
1837 Philadelphia Typhus 
1841 Nationwide [especially severe in the south] Yellow Fever 
1847 New Orleans Yellow Fever 
1847-8 Worldwide Influenza 
1848-9 North America Cholera 
1850 Nationwide Yellow Fever 
1850-1 North America Influenza 
1852 Nationwide [New Orleans-8,000 die in summer] Yellow Fever 
1855 Nationwide [many parts] Yellow Fever 
1857-9 Worldwide [one of the greated epidemics] Influenza 
1860-1 Pennsylvania Smallpox 
1865-73 Philadelphia, NY, Boston, New Orleans} {Smallpox 
Baltimore, Memphis, Washington DC} {Cholera 
[A series of recurring epidemics of:} {Typhus 
{Typhoid 
{Scarlet Fever 
{Yellow Fever 
1873-5 N. America and Europe Influenza 
1878 New Orleans [last great epidemic] Yellow Fever 
1885 Plymouth, PA Typhoid 
1886 Jacksonville, FL Yellow Fever 
1918 Worldwide[high point yr] more people were {Influenza 
hospitalized in WWI from this epidemic than 
wounds. US Army training camps became 
death camps, with 80% death rate in some 
camps 
Finally, these specific instances of cholera were mentioned: 

1833 Columbus, OH 
1834 New York City 
1849 New York 
1851 Coles Co., IL, The Great Plains, and Missouri 

(from Kansas mailing list) 

{{{Jayne}}} Now this is indeed interesting to know. Thanks for the tip.... 
************************************************************************************* 
************************************************************************************* 

WHAT WE ARE ABOUT…………. 

OUR FOCUS: the "History of the North American Civil War". 

OUR GOAL: to enhance your Genealogy activity, knowledge, and "wisdom" by talking about the history 
surrounding their lives and actions; specifically the "Civil War" that our ancestors lived through and died 
because of. 

OUR PROMISE: to provide an "online" environment that is NOT judgemental and to address ALL 
aspects of this "Pivotal Period" in our History, with honesty and truth (where we know it). 

We do "Fireside Stories" about the battles, the people and the social happenings. In addition we dedicate 
one Thursday a month to the sharing Songs, Poems and Letters from that era. So come back and visit; 
we'll save you a seat at the Fireside, and keep the Cider warm..... For a full listing of upcoming events, 
either look on the Schedule at the end of this Notice or in the Upcoming Events of the Genealogy Forum. 

As we review the logs, and we find new visitors who show an interest or have entered into discussions on 
this topic in our Thursday sessions, we automatically add you to the distribution for this "Weekly 
Fireside." 

AND TO YOU "FIRST-TIMERS" THIS WEEK, "Welcome"... :) 

We heartily enjoyed your visit and participation. We relish what members bring to the discussions, and 
we hope to see more of you.... Note that for any reason, should you desire to be removed from 
distribution of this "Weekly Missif", just drop us a line and we will comply with your wishes "poste- 
haste". 

Schedule of Upcoming Topics/Events****** 

Time: Every Thursday Night at 11pm ET in the Golden Gates Room with Host GFS Jim and our many 
fill-in friends :) 

8/20/98 - OPEN CHAT 

8/27/98 - OPEN CHAT (GFS Jim's on the road again) 

9/3/98 - OPEN CHAT (GFS Jim's STILL on the road) 

9/10/98 - "Letters, Songs and Poems" Night, featuring the collection of Frank Crawford. Don't miss it. 

We'll See You Thursday Night……….! 
Your Hosts 
GFS Jayne and GFS Jim

Back to Weekly Fireside Newsletter index

Back to the Main Page